Home:   Domestic

Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.

Cameras, projectors, radios, gramophones, televisions, tape and wire recorders, electrical equipment

A Short History of the Gramophone

A Short History of the Gramophone

A Brief History of Wireless

A Brief History of Wireless


Image of VICEROY DRY SHAVER (SPRING LOADED), 1936

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VICEROY DRY SHAVER (SPRING LOADED), 1936

Non-electric razor with cutter driven by friction motor and external hand-crank. Dark maroon phenol plastic body similar to later electric version.Sliding cutting head similar in principle to Schick/Remmington with sliding cover. Stiff metal case covered, normally with cleaning brush supplied. Tricky to use as two simultaneous actions are needed - cranking the lever and guiding the shaving head.

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A1462

Image of PHILISHAVE BATTERY SHAVER, 1950's

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PHILISHAVE BATTERY SHAVER, 1950's

Philishave was the brand name for the electric shavers manufactured by the Philips Domestic Appliances and Personal Care unit of Philips (in the U.S.A., the Norelco name is used instead). In recent years, Philips had extended the Philishave brand to include hair clippers, beard trimmers and beard shapers. Philips used the Philishave brand name for their shavers from 1939 to 2006.

The Philishave shaver was invented by Philips engineer Alexandre Horowitz, who used rotating cutters instead of the reciprocating cutters that had been used in previous electric shavers.

The shaver was introduced in 1939, though initial production was limited due to the outbreak of World War II (the production facility in Eindhoven, the Netherlands was overrun by the German Army in 1940).
After the war, a slightly improved version of the cigar-shaped single-head shaver was introduced. A more ergonomic egg-shaped single-head model was introduced in 1948 and was designed by US industrial designer Raymond Loewy. Global sales increased markedly after a double-head model was introduced in 1951.
The brand name Philishave was phased out in 2006.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1193

Image of PIFCO RAZOLITE MIRROR, 1952

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PIFCO RAZOLITE MIRROR, 1952

The Pifco Razor Lite, a small mirror with a mains lamp behind, which shines through a small area of the mirror.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1197

Image of ELECTRIC MINI PERM, 1930's

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ELECTRIC MINI PERM, 1930's

Electric Hair curling system with heated rods holding curling tongs.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1172

Image of 'FEN SON'  ELECTRIC HAIR DRYER, 1925

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'FEN SON' ELECTRIC HAIR DRYER, 1925

This is a very early example of an electric hair dryer.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1247

Image of 'BEST FRIEND'  HAIR DRYER, 1932

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'BEST FRIEND' HAIR DRYER, 1932

Another example of an early hair dryer. They ARE extremely heavy to use.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1245

Image of FORFEX HAIR DRYER, 1930's

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FORFEX HAIR DRYER, 1930's

A hair dryer originating from the 1930's.

The name Forfex still exists, and hair dryers and clippers are still made under this brand name.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1246

Image of RAYDO ELECTRIC HAIR BRUSH, 1930's

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RAYDO ELECTRIC HAIR BRUSH, 1930's

A small battery in the block is connected to wires on the brush used as the bristles. As the hair is combed the current from the battery passes through the scalp via the wires.

The instructions claim that the brush can stop baldness and grey hair from forming if the unit is used seven minutes in the morning and five minutes at night, every day.

It was not actually very effective. We think that this would be considered a Quackery item.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1243

Image of WHITES ELECTRIC HAIR BRUSH, 1920's

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WHITES ELECTRIC HAIR BRUSH, 1920's

"Electricity gives life giving properties to the hair right down to the roots".

According to the instructions, one 3 volt battery can do all this?. Just switch the unit on and brush 5 minutes in the morning and 7 minutes at night. The bristles are sharp hard wire, it must have been very painful to use. We think it's another Quackery item.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1194

Image of ROLLS RAZOR 'VICEROY' ELECTRIC DRY SHAVER in TRAVEL PACK, 1938

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ROLLS RAZOR 'VICEROY' ELECTRIC DRY SHAVER in TRAVEL PACK, 1938

Rolls Razor Ltd. is probably best known because of its sets of safety razors with a sharpening device (1920's and later) and later its manually driven Viceroy Non-electric Dry Shaver (patent application filed 1937). In the 1940's and 1950's Rolls Razor also manufactured electric shavers.

Assuming good prospects on the electric shaver market, Rolls Razor opened a new factory in Hemel Hempstead, where it was one of the pioneers in a new industrial area. However, Rolls Razor announced that it was to close its factory because of mounting losses and fears of a world slump - it was going back 'home' to Cricklewood. The company sold the Hemel Hempstead site and land for expansion to Kodak. Kodacolor film was introduced in 1957 and all the colorfilm processing in the UK was to be carried out at the Hemel Hempstead plant.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1192

Image of SIEMENS ELECTRIC BATTERY RAZOR, 1938

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SIEMENS ELECTRIC BATTERY RAZOR, 1938

An ordinary safety razor with modified blade holder which moves from side to side, driven by a small motor in the handle. Batteries are kept in a separate metal box.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1249

Image of SINGLE HEAD PHILISHAVE, 1940

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SINGLE HEAD PHILISHAVE, 1940

Philishave was the brand name for the electric shavers manufactured by the Philips Domestic Appliances and Personal Care unit of Philips (in the U.S.A., the Norelco name is used instead). In recent years, Philips extended the Philishave brand to include hair clippers, beard trimmers and beard shapers. Philips used the Philishave brand name for their shavers from 1939 to 2006.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1244

Image of CURLING IRONS FOR HAIR, 1906

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CURLING IRONS FOR HAIR, 1906

The Hair Curling Iron was heated inside an electric element on a stand. For domestic use.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1241

Image of ELECTRIC MASSAGER, 1930's

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ELECTRIC MASSAGER, 1930's

Personal massaging equipment for the home. It has rubber pronged disks fitted to the motor and a mechanism to create a vibrating motion.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1239

Image of ARNOLD HAIR REMOVAL UNIT, 1920's

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ARNOLD HAIR REMOVAL UNIT, 1920's

Ladies hair removal system.
A simple needle and a wrist strap connected to a battery, and power control to increase the voltage. The needle is inserted into the channel of the hair until it reaches the root, the voltage kills the root and the hair will whither and die.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1184

Image of VANDRE HAIR REMOVER, 1930's

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VANDRE HAIR REMOVER, 1930's

Ladies hair removal system. It consists of a simple needle and a wrist strap connected to a battery and power control, which gradually increases the voltage.

The needle is inserted into the channel of the hair until it reaches the root, the voltage kills the root and the hair will drop out.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1185

Image of PIFCO HEAT MASSAGER, 1950's

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PIFCO HEAT MASSAGER, 1950's

Relieves Colds, Sinus, Rheumatic Pains, Muscular Aches and Pains, Stiff Neck, Sore Throat, Pains in the Back! or so the pamphlet says. Just switch on and rub over the affected area. Cost £4.00 in the 1950's. We think this might be considered Quackery.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1196

Image of CARBON ARC SUN RAY LAMP, 1950's

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CARBON ARC SUN RAY LAMP, 1950's

A Health Ray Sun Lamp that uses two Carbon rods connected to the mains via a cooking element, this acts as a safety load.

When the carbons touch they create an arc of light that is very high in Ultra Violet light, making it ideal for a sun lamp. This unit would not only produce lots of smoke but the rods would continually need adjusting, as they quickly deteriorate when in use and burn away.

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A0972

Image of BULGIN GRAMOPHONE SIGNAL LAMP, 1940's

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BULGIN GRAMOPHONE SIGNAL LAMP, 1940's

The box Reads:- Indicates when the amplifier is switched on and throws a white shaft of light on the turntable. A neat switch is incorporated in the base. Highly nickel plated ruby lens fittings. Baseboard fitting. Terminal connections. Price 3/6d

Bruce Hammond collection

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A1502

Image of THE EDISON STANDARD PHONOGRAPH, 1900's

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THE EDISON STANDARD PHONOGRAPH, 1900's

The first commercially produced playing machine. It worked by vibrating the stylus up and down whilst moving across the cylinder (Hill and Dale method).

Prices dropped from $150 in 1891 to $20 in 1899.

Cylinders were 50 cents each.

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A0534

Image of GRAPHAPHONE PHONOGRAPH TYPE Q, 1903

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GRAPHAPHONE PHONOGRAPH TYPE Q, 1903

The Columbia Graphaphone Type Q also known as a QC with lid, was one of the Columbia lowest priced Phonographs selling at a mere $7.50. Made between 1903 and 1905 it plays standard 2 minute cylinders compatible with Edison’s Phonographs. After Sumner Tainter and A.G.Bell of telephone fame got together and produced the first wax cylinders Edison started producing his Phonograph using wax instead of his foil type cylinder, contesting in court that his patent had been infringed, this went on for two years during which, his own product was limited in production. Tainter and Bell succeeded in getting a patent for there wax process and the two companies continued in opposition.

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A1377

Image of TOURNAPHONE/PATHE GRAMOPHONE, 1906

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TOURNAPHONE/PATHE GRAMOPHONE, 1906

This model of the Tournaphone was made in Germany under license before the First World War. Note:- these machines use a jewelled stylus not a needle.

The word gramophone was first used by Alexander Graham Bell when he developed a machine using flat records instead of cylinders, but the principle was the same as Edison's Hill and Dale method (stylus vibrates up and down). Emile Berliner, a German American, first produced flat records that vibrated the stylus from side to side (the opposite of Bell's design).

The Tournaphone was a design developed by 'PATHE' in 1906 and plays Hill and Dale records at 90 rpm starting from the inside moving to the outside. It was easily changed to play ordinary 78 rpm records by turning the sound box, and replacing the jewelled stylus with a needle. 78 rpm records continued till the 1950's, the museum demonstrates 78rpm records on several gramophones including the Tournaphone.

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A0788

Image of EDISON FIRESIDE PHONOGRAPH TYPE , 1909

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EDISON FIRESIDE PHONOGRAPH TYPE , 1909

The Edison Fireside was a compact phonograph that was introduced with the release of four-minute records in 1908. This model was immediately very popular, the mechanism has a factory-installed switch for choosing 2 versus 4 minute records, the Model K reproducer has a swivelling stylus for different types of cylinders, and the horn is the small maroon Morning Glory type. Type 'A' indicates the first in the series of this model.

Donated by Peter and June Carter

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A1463

Image of DECCA PORTABLE REFLECTOR GRAMOPHONE, 1920's

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DECCA PORTABLE REFLECTOR GRAMOPHONE, 1920's

This type of gramophone was a favourite with Officers during the First World War.

There have been many reports of Officers enjoying records behind the lines and some units have been found with bullet damage.

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A0537

Image of WAX CYLINDERS (GOLD TYPE), 1920's

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WAX CYLINDERS (GOLD TYPE), 1920's

These are two minute cylinders played at 160 revolutions per minute, for use with item A0534 the Edison Standard Phonograph. Called gold because of the new process used to make the master in 1902. Edison ceased making cylinders in 1929 when his Phonographic Company closed down.

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A0730

Image of PETER PAN FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1924

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PETER PAN FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1924

Designed to be fully portable in a box similar to cameras of the period.

Donated by Mrs Lilias Johnson

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A0884

Image of STROVIOLS, ONE STRING FIDDLE, 1930's

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STROVIOLS, ONE STRING FIDDLE, 1930's

The instrument on the right is made by the inventor Charles Stroh; on the left is a home made version using a cigar box.

The introduction of Gramophones spurred the idea that greater volume could be achieved by amplifying the sound of an instrument with a horn. Early buskers could not afford the horned version, let alone a real fiddle, so they made their own out of cigar or biscuit boxes.....

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A0802, A0506

Image of HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 109, 1930's

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HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 109, 1930's

The HMV gramophone is a model 109.
of the late 1920's, this one probably 1930's.

This Model 109 was advertised in the company brochure of 1928-1929 The Oak Model costing £10-10-0d Mahogany costing £12-0-0d

HMV, His Masters Voice, a famous style Gramophone from before WW2 and used well into the 1960's. The original style dates from 1913.

78rpm records were still being played well into the 1960's. 78 rpm records are still available, this player can be demonstrated in the museum.

In 1899 'The Gramophone Company' the UK partner to the US Gramophone Co, run by Emile Berliner, purchased the Trademark 'His Masters Voice' using a painting by Francis Barraud showing 'Nipper' the dog listening to a Phonograph, this had to be altered at the Gramophone Company's request, to show one of Berliners Gramophones as the original had an Edison type Phonograph.

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A0538

Image of J.B.WOODROFFE ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

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J.B.WOODROFFE ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

In the 1920's Electric recording was a possibility, the general public were using clockwork Gramophones to play 78 rpm records using acoustic pick ups, as Wireless sets were becoming popular it could be possible if your Wireless had a Gram input on the rear of the set to plug in an Electric pick up similar to one of these. J.B.Woodroffe patented this particular type in 1927 although many similar types were to follow, this was one of the first. It consists of a horseshoe magnet with a moveable armature attached to a standard needle, which fits into the bottom of the unit with a small knurled screw, the coils pick up the movement, and produce a variable current which is amplified by the wireless speaker amplifier.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1500

Image of LISSEN ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

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LISSEN ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

In the 1920's Electric recording was a possibility, the general public were using clockwork Gramophones to play 78 rpm records using acoustic pick ups, as Wireless sets were becoming popular it could be possible if your Wireless had a Gram input on the rear of the set to plug in an Electric pick up similar to one of these. It consists of a magnet with a moveable armature attached to a standard needle, which fits into the bottom of the unit with the magnet securing it in place, the coils pick up the movement, and produce a variable current which is amplified by the wireless speaker amplifier.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1501

Image of HMV ELECTRIC PICK UP, 1930's

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HMV ELECTRIC PICK UP, 1930's

The acoustic pick up of a standard gramophone is removed and replaced with the unit supplied. The lead is connected to a volume unit which in turn is plugged into the Gram input of a Wireless receiver of the period. The gramophone is used in the normal way after fitting a steel needle to the new pick up, much louder sounds of the records are now emitted from the wireless.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1257

Image of RI AND VARLEY GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

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RI AND VARLEY GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

High quality electric Pick Up for converting wind up gramophones for electric insertion to the Gram input of wireless's Gram input terminals. Made by Radio Instruments Ltd,in conjunction with Varley Ltd.

Nortel Collection

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A1328

Image of EDISON BELL MAGNETIC PICK UP CONVERSION, 1930's

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EDISON BELL MAGNETIC PICK UP CONVERSION, 1930's

Wireless was becoming more popular in the early 30's; mechanical gramophones had been around for much longer.

If the acoustic head of a Gramophone was removed and the round block with a pillar for a needle in this kit was mounted in its place, then plugged into the other section which had a 4 pin valve plug on it, the unit could be plugged into the socket on a wireless receiver that was reserved for the valve prior to the speaker valve. This would connect the new electrical pick up to the audio output stage of the receiver, thus using it as an amplifier.

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A0743

Image of GRAMOPHONE POSTCARDS, 1930's

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GRAMOPHONE POSTCARDS, 1930's

In 1929 Raphael Tuck went into the business of producing Gramophone Record Postcards. The English monthly journal Musical Opinion and Music Trades Review had a regular column "Gramophone Gossip". The September 1929 issue contains the following: “Gramophone Record Postcards: Messrs. Raphael Tuck are responsible for an amusing and interesting innovation in the shape of gramophone record picture postcards. Measuring 3in., these discs play for one minute and cost 3d each. Several series are already available, and I have heard admirable demonstrations of "Auld Lang Syne", "Ye Banks and Braes", "Annie Laurie", "Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond". Besides these songs there are orchestral records and cornet and saxophone solos. One immediate result of these postcards has been the installation of portable gramophones in the smaller stations to demonstrate them!“

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A1341

Image of LISSENOLA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

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LISSENOLA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

Classic style of portable gramophone with storage for records in the lid.

Donated by Mrs Edwards

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A0925

Image of COLUMBIA STEEL PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

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COLUMBIA STEEL PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

Gramophone number 100 made in England by Columbia, the Trade Mark for EMI Records.

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A1012

Image of HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 104, 1932

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HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 104, 1932

A beautiful example of the famous HMV Gramophone. The sound was fair due to the wooden box, but not as good as some horn types. The style similar to this was first introduced in 1913.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1154

Image of THORENS  'EXCELDA' FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1932

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THORENS 'EXCELDA' FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1932

Thorens is a Swiss manufacturer of high-end audio equipment. They are historically renowned for the range of phonographs (turntables) they produce. In addition to audio playback equipment, they are also a historical producer of harmonicas and cigarette lighters, most notably the button activated automatic lighter.

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A0866

Image of KING GEORGE V CHRISTMAS ADDRESS 1935, 1935

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KING GEORGE V CHRISTMAS ADDRESS 1935, 1935

'A Message to the Empire' on a 78rpm record (Broadcast on Christmas Day 1935) H.M.King George V (The profits from this record were paid to Charities nominated by H.M. the King.

Nortel Collection

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A1401

Image of COLUMBIA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1940's

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COLUMBIA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1940's

Portable gramophone for 78rpm records, common in the 1940's and 50's.

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A0812

Image of 'NIPPER'  ADVERTISING TRADE MARK FOR HMV, 1940's

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'NIPPER' ADVERTISING TRADE MARK FOR HMV, 1940's

Nipper was born in 1884 in Bristol, England, and died in September 1895. It has been claimed by various sources that he was a Jack Russell Terrier, a Fox Terrier, a Rat Terrier, or an American Pit Bull Terrier. He was named Nipper because he tried to bite visitors in the leg.

In 1898, three years after Nipper’s death, his owner painted a picture of Nipper listening intently to a wind-up Edison-Bell cylinder phonograph. On February 11th 1899 he filed an application for copyright of his picture “Dog Looking At and Listening to a Phonograph.” Thinking the Edison-Bell Company might find it useful, he presented it to James E. Hough who (displaying the kind of thinking that would eventually doom the Edison Records company itself) promptly said, “Dogs don’t listen to phonographs”.

On May 31st 1899, Nippers owner went to the Maiden Lane offices of The Gramophone Company with the intention of borrowing a brass horn to replace the original black horn on the painting. Manager, William Barry Owen, suggested that if the artist replaced the entire machine with a Berliner disc gramophone, the Company would buy the painting. A modified form of the painting became the successful trademark of Victor and HMV records, HMV music stores, and RCA.

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A0535

Image of PIXIE PHONE, 1950's

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PIXIE PHONE, 1950's

Toy gramophone with records of nursery rhymes and short stories. Made as a cheap novelty for children during the late 1940's 50's.

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A0964

Image of FIDELITY PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

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FIDELITY PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

The Fidelity player was powered from the mains. Unlike earlier record players this one played 45rpm records, as well as 78rpm with a turn over type cartridge,using a LP stylus and a larger version for 78 records.

The case was made from cardboard and cost £12.10s.6d. Mr. T.Cass bought one for £2 pounds deposit and 12 monthly payments of 10 Shillings and 6 pence.

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A0521

Image of RUCO PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

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RUCO PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

Plays 45 rpm records only. Valve amplifier. 'Garrard' turntable BA.1

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A0919

Image of REGENTONE RECORD PLAYER IN FIBRE CASE, 1960's

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REGENTONE RECORD PLAYER IN FIBRE CASE, 1960's

Portable record player in a small suit case powered from the mains electricity.
Complete with small internal amplifier

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A0522

Image of PLUS-a-GRAM JUNIOR MPA PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1960's

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PLUS-a-GRAM JUNIOR MPA PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1960's

Normally this player would have been connected to the 'Gram' input provided on the back of some radios.

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A0926

Image of SANYO PORTABLE RADIOGRAM, 1970's

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SANYO PORTABLE RADIOGRAM, 1970's

Transistorised Record player and radio.

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A0532

Image of SHARP MZ 100 PC, 1980's

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SHARP MZ 100 PC, 1980's

An early example of a Personal Computer. It used a domestic television as a display. The program was supplied on a cassette tape run on an internal tape player.

Donated by Geoff Robinson

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A0954

Image of PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR TI59 AND PC-100c PRINTER, 1970's

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PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR TI59 AND PC-100c PRINTER, 1970's

The TI-59 was an early programmable calculator, manufactured by Texas Instruments from 1977. It was the successor to the TI SR-52, quadrupling the number of "program steps" of storage, and adding "ROM Program Modules" (an insert-able ROM chip, capable of holding 5000 program steps.) It was one of the first LED calculators. Also available for the TI-59 was a thermal printer (the PC100C); the calculator was mounted on top of the printer. It could print out a hard copy of the calculator's program, where the instructions were listed with the same alphanumeric mnemonics as the keys , not just the numeric key codes.

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A1459

Image of HEWLETT PACKARD POCKET PC, 1970's

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HEWLETT PACKARD POCKET PC, 1970's

Pocket sized personal computer, supplied by Zengrange Ltd Leeds, England

Donated by Allen Robert

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A1024

Image of EPSON HX20 LAPTOP COMPUTER, 1982

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EPSON HX20 LAPTOP COMPUTER, 1982

The Epson HX-20 (also known as the HC-20) is generally regarded as the first laptop computer, announced in November 1981, although first sold widely in 1983. Full-size keyboard, an LCD screen, printer, tape storage device, built-in rechargeable batteries. Microsoft BASIC is also included in ROM. Price in 1982 US$795. CPU=Two Hitachi 6301 @ 0.614MHz. Ram 16K, 32K max

Nortell Collection

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A1385

Image of COMMODORE PET 8296 DISK DRIVE AND PRINTER, 1984

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COMMODORE PET 8296 DISK DRIVE AND PRINTER, 1984

The last of the Pet series this one made in western Germany in 1984 The final version of what could be thought of as the "classic" PET was the PET 4000 series.

This was essentially the later model 2000 series, but with a larger black-and-green monitor and a newer version of Commodore's BASIC programming language.

By this point Commodore had noticed that many customers were buying the "low memory" versions of the machines and installing their own RAM chips, so the 4008 and 4016 had the sockets punched out of the motherboard.

Donated by Geoff Robinson

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A0937

Image of SINCLAIR ZX81 PERSONAL COMPUTER, 1981

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SINCLAIR ZX81 PERSONAL COMPUTER, 1981

Successor to Sinclair's ZX80, 1.5 million units were sold before it was discontinued. Programs and data were loaded and saved onto audiotape cassettes; The ZX81 could be bought by mail order in kit form or pre-assembled. It came with 1 Kb of on-board memory, QWERTY keyboard layout, and an optional a 16 Kb RAM pack shown in the picture. The owner supplied a TV and cassette recorder.

Donated by L.G.Bray

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A1524

Image of SINCLAIR  SPECTRUM PERSONNAL COMPUTER, 1982

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SINCLAIR SPECTRUM PERSONNAL COMPUTER, 1982

The original ZX Spectrum with rubber keyboard, being small in size and with a rainbow motif. Originally released in 1982 with 16 KB of RAM for £125 Sterling or with 48 KB for £175; these prices were later reduced to £99 and £129 respectively. Owners of the 16 KB model could purchase an internal 32 KB RAM upgrade. Shown with printer, Micro drive, tape-loop cartridge storage device, and an Interface, with RS232 port, the owner provided a colour TV and Cassette recorder, for program storage.

Donated by L.G.Bray

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A1523

Image of URANIUM GLASS CANDLESTICK, 1930's

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URANIUM GLASS CANDLESTICK, 1930's

The term uranium glass, to the collector, will always be associated with that oily, yellow-green, transparent medium known as Vaseline glass.

The chemistry textbooks tell us that uranium was discovered by the German chemist, Martin Heinrich Klaproth, in 1789, although this may not be the whole story. The element was named after the planet Uranus and what Klaproth reported to the Royal Prussian Academy of Science in that year was uranium oxide, which he had separated from the heavy, black mineral known as pitchblende. The element itself was not isolated until 1841, but this did not stop it from being used in glass-making. Items made using such elements mainly for the colouration have a unique trait, they glow under Ultra Violet light, they are not however usually very Radio Active, this one is unmeasured, as it is too weak. Uranium glass can still be purchased today because of its unique colour.

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A1454

Image of ELECTRIC TRAVELLING IRON, 1930's

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ELECTRIC TRAVELLING IRON, 1930's

Electric Travelling Iron, the first design that became very popular.
Wall sockets were rare before WW2, sometimes only one would be in the house, and often none at all, even if you were lucky enough to have Electricity, the lead for this Iron was usually plugged into the lamp bulb holder hung from the ceiling.
It also has no safety earth connection.


Bruce Hammond Collection

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A0352

Image of VOLTA ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

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VOLTA ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

Early Volta electric Iron.
This one comes complete with a stand

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1212

Image of ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

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ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

Early Electric Iron.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1213

Image of SERVANTS CALL BOX, 1930's

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SERVANTS CALL BOX, 1930's

Servants call system on demonstration board, flaps on the indicator panel (annunciator) moves from side to side when called as the bell rings, and are marked to indicate caller.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1166

Image of HOOVER 750, 1930's

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HOOVER 750, 1930's

First Hoover with famous 'beats-as-it-sweeps -as-it-cleans' motor-driven agitator/brush unit, also the first with a polished aluminium body, it replaced the Hoover model 541. It has a switch integral with the black steel handle and an orange triangular badge. Replaced by 1930 Hoover model 725 with snap-action handle and orange motor band. Basis for standard large Hoover upright until 1936 and continuing in modified form up to 1939.


Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1160

Image of STYLOPHONE, 1967

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STYLOPHONE, 1967

The Stylophone is a miniature stylus operated synthesizer invented in 1967 by Brian Jarvis. It consists of a metal keyboard played by touching it with a stylus. Three million Stylophone's were sold, mostly as children's toys, Rolf Harris appeared for several years as the Stylophone's advertising spokesman in the United Kingdom. The Stylophone was available in three variants: standard, bass and treble, the standard one being by far the most common.

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A1287

Image of 'LITBADGE' AN ILLUMINATED BADGE, 1937

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'LITBADGE' AN ILLUMINATED BADGE, 1937

An illuminated badge to celebrate the coronation of George VI in 1937.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1261

Image of PIFCO ELECTRIC TIE PRESS, 1955

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PIFCO ELECTRIC TIE PRESS, 1955

Slide the tie down the blade and plug the unit in.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1262

Image of PIFCO ELECTRIC TROUSER PRESS, 1950's

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PIFCO ELECTRIC TROUSER PRESS, 1950's

A press for the seams of trousers. Once heated the blades are opened and sandwiched over the crease then moved along the length of the legs.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1266

Image of BAKELITE ELECTRIC WATER BOTTLE, 1943

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BAKELITE ELECTRIC WATER BOTTLE, 1943

Although shaped like a standard rubber hot water bottle, no water is needed. Just slip into the bed and plug in.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1242

Image of OZONE AIR FAN AND GENERATOR, 1930's

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OZONE AIR FAN AND GENERATOR, 1930's

Ozone generator with an electric fan mounted on the top.

Devices generating high levels of ozone, some of which use ionization, are used to sanitize and deodorize uninhabited buildings, rooms, ductwork, woodsheds, boats and other vehicles.

Bruce Hammond Collection

For more information see item A1200

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A1211

Image of TWO BED WARMERS, 1940's

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TWO BED WARMERS, 1940's

One made of porcelain one made of Bakelite, simply electric water bottles (without the water), no regulation and fairly low power. Sold before electric blankets were available.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1171

Image of FULLY AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC CLOTHES BRUSH, 1950's

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FULLY AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC CLOTHES BRUSH, 1950's

Gadgets like this were common after the War, this claimed to clean clothes on the wearer better than an ordinary brush.

It consists of a fan and a small bag for catching anything that it could suck up. In reality it was no better than an ordinary clothes brush.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1170

Image of LAZY DAISY BELL & CALL BUTTON, 1940's

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LAZY DAISY BELL & CALL BUTTON, 1940's

Used as a portable housemaid calling system.

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A0118

Image of STEWARD 'STICK' VACUUM CLEANER, 1936

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STEWARD 'STICK' VACUUM CLEANER, 1936

A small vacuum cleaner dated 1936

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1158

Image of BUSTLER (STICK) VACUUM CLEANER, 1930

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BUSTLER (STICK) VACUUM CLEANER, 1930

The 'stick' upright cleaner was a popular format in the 20's and 30's. It was cheaper and lighter, though lower-powered, that larger cleaners. The 'Bustler' was a popular British model which was available well into the 1950s.

Best described as an 'electric broom', the motor, fan chamber and bag were all mounted on the handle, with only the nozzle in contact with the floor.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1159

Image of ULTRAZONE OZONE GENERATOR, 1922

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ULTRAZONE OZONE GENERATOR, 1922

Devices generating high levels of ozone, some of which use ionization, are used to sanitize and deodorize uninhabited buildings, rooms, ductwork, woodsheds, boats and other vehicles.

In the U.S., air purifiers emitting lower levels of ozone have been sold. This kind of air purifier is sometimes claimed to imitate nature's way of purifying the air without filters and to sanitize both it and household surfaces. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has declared that there is "evidence to show that at concentrations that do not exceed public health standards, ozone is not effective at removing many odour-causing chemicals or "viruses, bacteria, mould, or other biological pollutants." Furthermore, its report states that "results of some controlled studies show that concentrations of ozone considerably higher than these [human safety] standards are possible even when a user follows the manufacturer’s operating instructions."

The US government successfully sued one company in 1995, ordering it to stop repeating health claims without supporting scientific studies, if that is the case we think it should be classed as Quackery.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1200

Image of ELECTRIC FIRE, 1908

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ELECTRIC FIRE, 1908

One of the very first electric fires. The lamps were made by Osram. With spare lamp. The Spare is made by Robertson.

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A0917

Image of TRICITY 'SUN RAY' LAMP HEATER, 1927

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TRICITY 'SUN RAY' LAMP HEATER, 1927

An electric fire that depended on the Infra-red output of a special light bulb.

The lamp produced both light and heat, and was designed as a standard occasional table lamp with a black painted copper base. Copper light diffusers concealed a 200 volt sausage-shaped Dowsing bulb.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1267

Image of ELECTRIC BOWL FIRE, 1930's

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ELECTRIC BOWL FIRE, 1930's

Electric fire used between the Wars and afterwards, operating from 240-250 volt AC mains.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1240

Image of STAR TOASTER, 1922

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STAR TOASTER, 1922

Early Electric Toaster made by Maniby Fitzgerald in the USA.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1225

Image of KNAPP TOASTER, 1930's

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KNAPP TOASTER, 1930's

Early electric toaster in modern looking shape. Made by Knapp Monarch.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1223

Image of PREMIER CHROME TOASTER, 1930's

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PREMIER CHROME TOASTER, 1930's

Early Electric Toaster Made by Premier.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1224

Image of RYNA TOASTER TYPE 87, 1940's

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RYNA TOASTER TYPE 87, 1940's

Early toaster from the 1940's with toast positioned on flip down sides, marked 200v 400 Watts.

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A0784

Image of ELECTRIC SAUCEPAN, 1911

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ELECTRIC SAUCEPAN, 1911

Electric Copper Saucepan

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1220

Image of HOTPOINT COPPER KETTLE, 1930's

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HOTPOINT COPPER KETTLE, 1930's

Early kettle made of Copper, heated electrically.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1176

Image of 'SAMOVAR', 1930's

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'SAMOVAR', 1930's

Electric copper pot. Possibly a Samovar.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1219

Image of COPPER KETTLE, 1920's

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COPPER KETTLE, 1920's

A fine example of an early electric kettle made in the UK by Cimflex Conduits Ltd. Faster boiling was achieved by Swan in 1922, by placing the element in a metal tube, directly into the water chamber.

Most electric kettles of the 1920s and 1930s retained the traditional look of their non-electric ancestor, usually being made from copper with the option of nickel-plate or vitreous-enamel finish. Some lighter aluminium kettles were made in the 1930s and a few chrome-plated streamlined designs with Bakelite handles appeared in the late-1930s.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1221

Image of CHROME KETTLE, 1914

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CHROME KETTLE, 1914

The electric kettle was a uniquely British product, owing its existence and development to the British habit of tea-drinking. An electric kettle was first made by Crompton and Co. in 1891 and all the earliest examples had the element in a separate dry chamber under the water, maintaining the 'fire under the water' layout of traditional boiling vessels. The separation of water from the element made the kettle inefficient and expensive to run.

The electric kettle was, with a few exceptions, a strictly functional object and seldom seen outside the kitchen, being regarded as a supplementary appliance to the electric cooker.

This electric kettle was made by Launders Fray & Clark of USA.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1222

Image of HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1936

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HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1936

This is one of the very first examples of a "Teamaker", see item A0123 for further details.
The shade is of the period, but it is not the original.

This is one of the many items which have been donated to the museum, we are always very grateful to all our visitors who decide to place objects into our care.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1226

Image of HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1952

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HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1952

The first Teamaker was made by Goblin in 1936, many similar types were made after this, the one shown was made by Hawkins in 1952.

The Teamaker was a British invention of the 1930’s and was developed by the British Vacuum Cleaner company ('Goblin') and first marketed in 1936.

Within a couple of years, similar early morning tea machines appeared, although all versions operated in the same way: the alarm on the clock was set and when reached, an electric element in the kettle was switched on to heat the water. The pressure of the boiling water made it decant through a tube in the kettle lid into an adjacent tea or coffee pot, making the whole unit pivot forward and activating the light and buzzer alarm. Thus the sleeper awoke to a freshly brewed pot of tea!

The 'Teasmade' was a prime example of the 'servant replacement' function of many electrical appliances, as it took on the task of the early morning maid, her first responsibility being to supply a welcome cup of tea. Some very lavish versions were produced on large trays, with matching teapots and crockery sets. The 'Teasmade' was one of the few gadgets of the period to have survived, creating its own market and developing into a recognised household appliance.
See item A1226 for the 1936 version.

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A0123

Image of KENWOOD CHEF MIXER, 1950's

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KENWOOD CHEF MIXER, 1950's

Kenwood’s first main successful product was the Kenwood Electric Chef food processor. This soon became a must-have kitchen item and housewives all over the country wanted one.

The Kenwood Manufacturing Company Ltd. was taken over by Thorn EMI in 1968 after the 'Chef' had made Kenneth Wood a multi-millionaire.

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A0122

Image of DRIED MILK TIN, 1940's

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DRIED MILK TIN, 1940's

An example of a WWII Dried Milk Tin dated 1945.

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A0865

Image of RONETTE CRYSTAL MICROPHONE TYPE B110 , 1950's

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RONETTE CRYSTAL MICROPHONE TYPE B110 , 1950's

Popular microphone for the amateur in the 1950's the element is piezo crystal in spite of its low output, the plastic is Polopas, (trade name) which is a form of Bakelite. Price in the 1950's $13.50.

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A1475

Image of ACOS MIC35-1 CRYSTAL MICROPHONE, 1950's

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ACOS MIC35-1 CRYSTAL MICROPHONE, 1950's

Crystal microphone made in the early 1950's at the Enfield factory of Cosmocord Ltd, they relocated to Waltham Cross in 1956. Crystal Microphones are very high impedance and provide a higher voltage output than other types, they are fragile and if dropped will probably cease to function, they are however the cheapest type. These types of microphone were supplied with low cost equipment such as Tape Recorders for domestic use.

Nortel Collection

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A1354

Image of ACOS CRYSTAL LAPEL MICROPHONE, 1950's

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ACOS CRYSTAL LAPEL MICROPHONE, 1950's

Crystal microphone for wearing on the lapel, made in the early 1950's at the Enfield factory of Cosmocord Ltd, they relocated to Waltham Cross in 1956. Crystal Microphones are very high impedance and provide a higher voltage output than other types, they are fragile and if dropped will probably cease to function, they are however the cheapest type. These types of microphone were supplied with low cost equipment such as Tape Recorders for domestic use.

Nortel Collection

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A1353

Image of STC 4114A MOVING COIL MICROPHONE, 1960's

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STC 4114A MOVING COIL MICROPHONE, 1960's

Less expensive version of the 4113A version, housed in a plastic box and using a standard round diaphragm with a coil impedance of 200 ohms. The price written on the box is £1-15s-0d.

Nortel Collection

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A1352

Image of STC 4113A RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1960's

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STC 4113A RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1960's

Ribbon Microphone for Public Address systems made by STC, it has a low
impedance of only 5 ohms and is small light and very robust.
The internal construction is of high quality, the Ribbon is fed by a horn,and is only 5mm across. No other information is known by the museum.


Nortel Collection

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A1351

Image of MICROPHONE USED BY GEORGE V IN 1924

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MICROPHONE USED BY GEORGE V IN 1924

The Microphone used by His Majesty George V in 1924 when he opened the Great Wembley Exhibition of that year, it is called a Double Button Carbon Granule Microphone, and was connected to a Public Address system also made by STC. This type of Microphone or Transmitter as it would have been known by, was patented by Standard Telephones & Cables in 1918 as ES386.

Nortel Collection

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A1350

Image of CARBON PUBLIC ADDRESS MICROPHONE IN FRAME, 1930's

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CARBON PUBLIC ADDRESS MICROPHONE IN FRAME, 1930's

Carbon Microphone for Public Address applications, fitted into a box with an on/off switch. Also in the box is a transformer to change the impedance of the device from low to standard 300ohm balanced line, a battery is required to drive the unit, which is wired to the input of the transformer and there is a space in the box for this.

"Reisz" type microphone

Nortel Collection

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A1324

Image of EARLY HAND MICROPHONE, 1920's

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EARLY HAND MICROPHONE, 1920's

Early Microphone of the carbon type used for Public Address,
with no makers identification, possibly a Kellog hand type. Marked with a broad arrow and the letter 'L'

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1264

Image of BTH MICROPHONE, 1930's

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BTH MICROPHONE, 1930's

Carbon Granules are packed between two carbon rods in a chamber on which one side is a diaphragm of Mica sheet , sound waves move the sheet and subsequently the granules, varying an electric current passed between the electrodes.
Early Microphone probably used for Public Address systems.

Donated by Kenneth Thompson

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A1031

Image of RESLOSOUND RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1950's

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RESLOSOUND RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1950's

Ribbon type Microphone 30 ohms with transformer for Simon Sound recorder item A0933.

Donated by Mr P Holmes

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A0934

Image of HMV RIBBON  MICROPHONE, 1950's

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HMV RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1950's

Ribbon microphone mainly used for Public Address, but of sufficient quality for a small studio.

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A0560

Image of STC 4021 'APPLE & BISCUIT' MICROPHONE, 1950's

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STC 4021 'APPLE & BISCUIT' MICROPHONE, 1950's

Microphone Moving Coil type Nicknamed 'Apple and Biscuit' because of its shape.
Seen on TV in the 50's being used by reporters.

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A0561

Image of WOODEN CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

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WOODEN CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

Carbon Granule Microphone for use with Public Address Systems.
"Reisz" type microphone

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A0734

Image of CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

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CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

Carbon Granule Microphone for public address use.
"Reisz" type microphone

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A0736

Image of MOVING IRON MICROPHONE, 1930's

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MOVING IRON MICROPHONE, 1930's

Probably just a toy for adults or early learners, the unit is of the carbon type. In the base is a matching transformer, and the primary element requires 1.5 volts to operate.
In use it has a unique sound like an early wireless broadcast.

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A0317

Image of MPR CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

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MPR CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

Low cost Carbon Microphone for the non professional market.

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A0318

Image of SHAFTESBURY RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1940's

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SHAFTESBURY RIBBON MICROPHONE, 1940's

Ribbon Microphone for Public Address and recording systems.
Ribbon Microphones produce the highest quality for the human voice and are used in recording studios.
This unit may have been used in a broadcast studio.

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A0319

Image of GRAMPIAN TYPE MCR MICROPHONE, 1930's

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GRAMPIAN TYPE MCR MICROPHONE, 1930's

Early Moving Coil Microphone used with Public Address systems.

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A0583

Image of MAHOGANY CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

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MAHOGANY CARBON MICROPHONE, 1930's

Carbon granule type microphone in correct mounting, used for Public Address Systems.

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A0735

Image of LISTEN AND LAUGH MICROPHONE, 1930's

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LISTEN AND LAUGH MICROPHONE, 1930's

If this was plugged into the Gramophone input at the back of a wireless receiver (of the same period), sounds directed at the device would emit from the receivers speaker.

This item would provide great entertainment for the whole family.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1255

Image of POLICEMANS HAND/BELT LAMP, 1950's

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POLICEMANS HAND/BELT LAMP, 1950's

Police belt lamp with wire handle, containing spare bulb, and box. Crown and ER stamped on the front. As Spec MW/CS/105 marked on the box.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1490

Image of EXIDE ACCUMULATOR EVER READY BOX AND CARRYING CASE, 1940's

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EXIDE ACCUMULATOR EVER READY BOX AND CARRYING CASE, 1940's

Standard Exide Accumulator with Ever Ready cardboard box in a wooden carrying case for two units.

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A1447

Image of GEC EARLY ELECTRIC FAN, 1950's

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GEC EARLY ELECTRIC FAN, 1950's

An Electric Fan made by GEC.

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A0503

Image of EVER READY TORCH, 1940's

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EVER READY TORCH, 1940's

Wooden Lamp with handle and lever switch.
Battery type unknown.

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A0211

Image of DROP DOWN LAMP, 1950's

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DROP DOWN LAMP, 1950's

Common pull down system, used in offices and shops before the Second World War.
This one is a 1950's style

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A0113

Image of EP TOY MOTOR, 1940's

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EP TOY MOTOR, 1940's

Possibly made for powering Meccano builds. 2.4 Volt

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A0886

Image of EARLY WARNING SIGN  'IT IS DANGEROUS TO TOUCH THE WIRES', 1930's

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EARLY WARNING SIGN 'IT IS DANGEROUS TO TOUCH THE WIRES', 1930's

Early warning sign advising persons not to touch the electric wires.
Also written in Welsh.
Common when Electricity was first introduced into homes.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1151

Image of NOVELTY BIRD LAMP, 1920's

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NOVELTY BIRD LAMP, 1920's

A novelty item for children with two lamps for eyes.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1228

Image of NANOX MAGNETO TORCH, 1919

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NANOX MAGNETO TORCH, 1919

Pushing the side flat metal lever drives a small generator to power the lamp.
This item is in perfect condition and still works.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1231

Image of CARBIDE LANTERN, 1950's

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CARBIDE LANTERN, 1950's

This Lantern was used by the 3rd Boxmoor Scouts before being donated to the museum.

Donated by Dennis Huke

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A0814

Image of TOY STEAM ENGINE, 1940's

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TOY STEAM ENGINE, 1940's

A working model of a Steam Engine made in Germany by M.G.& Company as a toy.

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A0807

Image of REMINGTON STANDARD No 7 TYPEWRITER, 1896

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REMINGTON STANDARD No 7 TYPEWRITER, 1896

This machine has wooden keys and is poor condition but all the marks and transfers still remain. Its Serial Number is 159,878 so it is probably made in the early 1900's.

The type is struck on the paper from underneath so the typist cannot see what has been printed without raising the Carriage assembly. Later this method was abandoned, due to pressure of competition, and replaced by front typing where the result can be seen.

Remington was the first to make the under-typing model after purchasing the rights from the inventor Christopher Laythem Sholes in 1876. By 1882 the name Remington was a brand only, Wyckoff Seamans and Benedict were producing them and bought sole rights to make the machines 3 years later.

This machine is in working order.

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A1345

Image of SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER No 10, circa 1908

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SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER No 10, circa 1908

This was the only full-keyboard front strike typewriter ever built.

When the Smith brothers' typewriter business ceased the name was bought by Remington who continued to make Smith Premier machines, including the No. 10(SP10).

The new Smith Premier (Remington) factory was opened in 1908. The Smith Premier No.10 with the new visible typing method was produced at the factory in addition to older up strike type machines which were still in use. Production of the No. 10 continued until 1921.

The Remington Junior was also built here.

Donated by Eileen Griffiths

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A1367

Image of ROYAL No 10 TYPEWRITER, 1927

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ROYAL No 10 TYPEWRITER, 1927

Production of the Royal No 10 started in 1914. It had glass windows on each side so you could view the workings; earlier models had two on each side, later types had only one.

The Royal company were so confident of the strength and reliability of these machines that they dropped them in a crate from air planes as a publicity stunt to prove that they would still function after such abuse.

Donated by Brian Kidd

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A1368

Image of UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER No 5, 1930's

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UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER No 5, 1930's

This model of office typewriter was in use for many years, and was still popular when computers replaced mechanical typewriters. This model has patents dating back to September 26 1899. The model number has not yet been identified; we think it's possibly a Number 5

The Underwood No.5 typewriter was first produced in 1901 by the Underwood Typewriter Company of New York. It was designed by a German-American, Franz X. Wagner, and was the first typewriter with a reliable 'front strike' mechanism which allowed the typist to see what was being typed. It was also faster than other designs of the time, operating effectively with a lighter touch, and had shift keys for caps and lower case letters, plus a tabulator key.

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A0099

Image of BURROUGHS STANDARD ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER  of 1932

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BURROUGHS STANDARD ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER of 1932

Burroughs produced more calculators than typewriters, this is their Electric carriage return machine that continued in production for many years but did not alter much in that time.

Its advantage was that the carriage assembly could return automatically, other than this it was just a standard typewriter.

Donated by Brian Kidd

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A1372

Image of IMPERIAL MODEL 58 TYPEWRITER, 1940's

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IMPERIAL MODEL 58 TYPEWRITER, 1940's

Imperial typewriters originated in 1908 in England and were made until personal computers became popular in the 70’s. The company was sold to Litton Industries in 1966 and the typewriters were no longer made in England as of 1974

Donated by Ken Thompson

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A1370

Image of REMMINGTON 'SUPER RITER' STANDARD TYPEWRITER of 1950

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REMMINGTON 'SUPER RITER' STANDARD TYPEWRITER of 1950

Remington 'Super-Riter' (1950) standard desktop manual typewriter made in USA by Remington Rand. This one is probably 1960's

Donated by Brian Kidd

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A1374

Image of IMPERIAL 66 TYPEWRITER , 1961

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IMPERIAL 66 TYPEWRITER , 1961

In 1954 Imperial announced a new machine, the 66. In 1967 they began to import cheaper machines from Japan and in the 1970's they were taken over by Litton Industries the American electronics company who also took over the Royal Company. Soon after the imperial name disappeared altogether.

The spools on the sides are for typing onto a tape.

Donated by Brian Kidd

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A1373

Image of IBM SELECTRIC 82 GOLF BALL TYPEWRITER, 1978

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IBM SELECTRIC 82 GOLF BALL TYPEWRITER, 1978

In 1865, Rev. Rasmus Malling-Hansen of Denmark invented the Hansen Writing Ball, which went into commercial production in 1870.

Instead of a 'basket" of pivoting type bars the Selectric had a pivoting type element (often called a "type ball") that could be changed so as to display different fonts in the same document, resurrecting a capacity that had been pioneered by the moderately successful Blickensderfer typewriter sixty years before.

One of the main advantages of the 'Ball' writers is removal of the problem of type bars becoming tangled due to by pushing two or three keys grouped together at the same time or by very fast typing, (particularly on poorly maintained machines), caused by working the machines faster than the bars could relax.

Donated by Mr I W Mallory

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A1375

Image of FLEXOWRITER PUNCH TAPE CODING MACHINE, 1950's

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FLEXOWRITER PUNCH TAPE CODING MACHINE, 1950's

Able to punch cards or tape using 5 bit code (tape has five readable holes per character). Its uses included fast transmission of telegraphy messages, paymaster data storage, or control of automatic equipment in a factory.

Donated by John Hutton

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A0096

Image of FRIDEN ELECTRO MECHANICAL CALCULATOR TYPE CW8, 1960's

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FRIDEN ELECTRO MECHANICAL CALCULATOR TYPE CW8, 1960's

An electromechanical calculator that will perform the four basic mathematical functions automatically.

Notes: Stepped drum, semi-automatic.
Digits: 10 keyboard, 11 counter, 20 accumulator

Donated by Brian Kidd

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A1371

Image of MULDIVO MENTOR MECHANICAL CALCULATOR, 1960's

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MULDIVO MENTOR MECHANICAL CALCULATOR, 1960's

An Odhner-type rotary pin-wheel machine.

This machine is fitted with a very useful back-transfer mechanism actuated by the small red lever at top right. This transfers the number in the result register back up to the setting register so that it can be used in further calculations.

Muldivo were the British importers and distributors. The machines were made by the famous weapon manufacture Carl Walther GMBH

Donated by Ken Thompson

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A1369

Image of ADDO-X ELECTRIC ADDING MACHINE, 1960's

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ADDO-X ELECTRIC ADDING MACHINE, 1960's

AB Addo Is a Company in Malmo Sweden, with a subsidiary in England, they merged with a Company called Facit around 1968. This machine was probably assembled in this country.
It will only add or subtract and can be used for old English money, or decimal.

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A1335

Image of PRECISA MECHANICAL CALCULATOR, 1950's

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PRECISA MECHANICAL CALCULATOR, 1950's

Mechanical calculating machine driven by three handles, Modell 117 Fabr. Nr. 353974 Made in Switzerland. Thanks to Kadri Balakci for identifying this model.

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A1329

Image of OLYMPIA MECHANICAL CALCULATOR, 1960's

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OLYMPIA MECHANICAL CALCULATOR, 1960's

This is a copy of the original 'Brunsviger' calculator invented by E.T.Odhner in 1890. It is very heavy and quite complicated to use.

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A0888

Image of OLIVETTI  MECHANICAL CALCULATOR 'SUMMA PRIMA 20', 1960's

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OLIVETTI MECHANICAL CALCULATOR 'SUMMA PRIMA 20', 1960's

Italian Olivetti mechanical calculator popular in the 1960's. Prints on paper by pulling handle down.

Donated by Mr Cambell

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A0921

Image of COMPTOMETER CALCULATOR, 1950's

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COMPTOMETER CALCULATOR, 1950's

The comptometer was invented by Dor Eugen Felt in the 1980's in America. Dorr E Felt started his first prototype during the Thanksgiving holidays of 1884. Because of his limited amount of money, he used a macaroni box for the outside box, and skewers, staples, and rubber bands for the mechanism inside. This prototype, called the macaroni box, is in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Units like the one shown were leased in large numbers by companies such as Sumloc Comptometer, who Purchased the rights in England in 1960, until electronic adding machines replaced them. See Item A1157. The machines worked by adding only and other functions were completed by progressive use of the keys.
Similar to the Sumlock machines leased by the bell Punch Company.
Not all Comptometers are of Bell Punch origin. Many were made and marketed by others, whether Bell Punch had there own manufacturing base for there machines is not clear. This model Model L.C. 912/SF/6069 of unknown manufacture could have been made in America and imported, then leased (as they usually were) by any number of companies.

This machine is Marked 'The London Computer Corporation'.

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A0101

Image of COMPTOMETER CALCULATOR 509/S, 1950's

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COMPTOMETER CALCULATOR 509/S, 1950's

This Model No 509/S/94.317 and models like this one were leased in large numbers by companies such as Sumloc Comptometer, until electronic adding machines replaced them. The machines worked by adding only and other functions were completed by progressive use of the keys, ladies often complained that the long strokes of pushing down the keys broke their finger nails. The curator of this museum used this model when she worked at Marks and Spencer in the 1960's and had the reputation of being the quickest operator in the office. The Plus and Sumlock are machines of the "Comptometer" type; the Sumlock being the full-keyboard version and the Plus the abbreviated-keyboard version. They are intended primarily for addition, but can also be used for subtraction, multiplication and division using learned techniques.
The main feature of this type of machine is that it has a full-keyboard and is "key driven", which means that pressing any key immediately adds the number on that key to the number displayed in that column, with carrying to the next column taking place where necessary.
The machine is designed so that keys in different columns can be pressed simultaneously. This means to add the cost of several identical items the operator arranges his or her fingers on the required keys and then depresses them all simultaneously the number of times for the number of items. Working in this way this type of machine is much faster than a 10-key type of machine where each digit has to be entered successively.
In 1960, the Bell Punch Company bought the British rights to the Comptometer design and trademark, and continued its development. In 1961, Sumlock, a division of the Bell Punch Company, was renamed The Sumlock Comptometer Ltd, and began marketing the first all-electronic desktop calculator, the ANITA Mark VII. The entire calculator division of the Bell Punch Company was bought by Rockwell International in 1973. Unfortunately they exited the calculator business in 1976 and shut down all operations.
Not all Comptometers are of Bell Punch origin. Many were made and marketed by others; whether Bell Punch had their own manufacturing base for these machines is not clear. See Item A1157.

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A0786

Image of SUMLOCK COMPTOMETER CALCULATOR MODEL 912/S , 1960's

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SUMLOCK COMPTOMETER CALCULATOR MODEL 912/S , 1960's

In 1960 the Bell Punch Company gained the right to the name Comptometer from the U.S. Comptometer Corporation.
This is Sterling currency Comptometer, with 10 £ decades, shillings, and pence. Note that the pence column does not have keys 1 to 11, only the standard number of decimal keys (1 to 9) so to enter 10d or 11d the operator has to successively press two keys to give the required figure.
The keyboard.
From left to right there are 9 columns of keys for Pounds, 2 columns of keys to give up to 20 shillings, and one column of keys to give up to 12 pence (there are only keys 1 to 9 so to enter 11 pence, for example, you have to press e.g. 5 and then 6). The name Comptometer has become synonymous with this type of calculator by whoever made them. In 1957 the Felt and Tarrant Manufacturing Company changed its name to Comptometer Corporation and in 1960 Comptometer Corporation sold its UK operation, including the right to the Comptometer name in Britain, to Control Systems Ltd, the parent of Bell Punch, which merged it with its own company to form Sumlock-Comptometer. Comptometer Corporation then contracted with Control Systems to have all its machines made by Bell Punch in England and shipped back to the U.S.A. This resulted in all Comptometer production ceasing in Chicago in 1961, and in machines from Sumlock being marked with the Comptometer name. Although these machines were very successful and thousands were sold, only a few companies manufactured the "Comptometer" type of calculator. The main manufacturers were Felt & Tarrant (later Victor Comptometer) and Burroughs in the U.S.A., and Bell Punch in Britain.

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A1456

Image of ANITA CALCULATOR 1021, 1970

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ANITA CALCULATOR 1021, 1970

This calculator uses 10-digit "Nixie"-type tube display, and memory, In 1970 it cost £431. With Square root capability. The electronics is similar to that of the Anita 1011. It uses mainly transistors, but also has integrated circuits made by Marconi-Elliott Microelectronics using "MOST" (Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Transistor) technology. These machines were marketed by Sumlock-Comptomter in the UK.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1157

Image of ABM ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR 312PD, 1970's

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ABM ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR 312PD, 1970's

ABM electronic calculator of the 1960/70's with printer and illuminated display.

Donated by Mr Cambell

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A0922

Image of CASIO PRINTING CALCULATOR, 1980's

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CASIO PRINTING CALCULATOR, 1980's

Small Electronic Calculator with mechanical thermal printer. Model HR 10

Donated by Mr Cambell

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A0920

Image of SINCLAIR 1st POCKET CACULATOR, 1973

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SINCLAIR 1st POCKET CACULATOR, 1973

Cambridge calculator, the first of seven calculators produced by the company. This model was launched in August 1973 and cost £29.95 + VAT. Also in kit form for £24.95. Weighing less than 3.5oz. Nowadays we can get calculators for £1.00, how times change.

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A0769

Image of EXACTUS POCKET CALCULATOR, 1955

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EXACTUS POCKET CALCULATOR, 1955

A mechanical pocket calculator for addition and subtraction of pounds shillings and pence. The calculator is made from pressed metal and enamelled in black and silver. The calculator consists of eight columns of figures and operates by using a stylus to move the metal slides inside each of the columns. When not in use the stylus clips to the side of the calculating machine. The calculating machine has a hinged metal panel that flips up when in subtraction mode and down when in addition mode. At the top of the calculator there is a metal handle that also functions to zero the calculator.

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A1140

Image of EMIDICTA DICTATION MACHINE MODEL  2400E, 1948

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EMIDICTA DICTATION MACHINE MODEL 2400E, 1948

Recorded magnetically on a flat disk of magnetic material this item was used as a dictation machine.

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A1130

Image of HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT DIVISION BELL, 1930's

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HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT DIVISION BELL, 1930's

Believed to be one of the bells connected to the Transmitter No2
(see Item No A0226) positioned in the Houses of Parliament, the transmitter was activated when it was necessary to call the M.P's to the house when a vote was needed.
The bells would be in all the bars and meeting places that the M.P's were likely to be, if a vote was imminent then the members were obliged not to stray far from a bell, usually no more than a mile away.
The local MP did say these were still to be seen in the House of Commons.

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A1137

Image of POST OFFICE TRANSMITTER NO.2, 1900's

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POST OFFICE TRANSMITTER NO.2, 1900's

It has been said that this transmitter was used to ring the Division Bell in the Houses of Parliament and that the No 2 and 3 units were destroyed by a bomb in the Second World War; this however is unit No 2 and is alive and well.

When a plunger is pushed on the top of the unit the gears are turned thus winding up a weight hanging below. The weight starts to fall turning the mechanism. At the end of the gear line is an air type governor which controls the speed of fall; also connected is a rocker controlling two contacts which change alternately; these contacts are wired to terminals on the side of the unit

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A0226

Image of GESTETNER DUPLICATOR, 1950's

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GESTETNER DUPLICATOR, 1950's

At a young age Gestetner began to work at the stock market in Vienna. One of his tasks was to make copies of the stock market activity at the end of the day by copying the results over and over for each copy. He decided that there had to be a better method, and his experiments eventually led him to invent the first method of reproducing documents by use of a stencil.

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A1139

Image of DICTOGRAPH OFFICE INTERCOM, 1950's

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DICTOGRAPH OFFICE INTERCOM, 1950's

When offices started to use the Dictograph, the main drawback of the system was the need to install extensive wiring, and businesses were reluctant to change to such an expensive system to replace their tried and tested speaking tubes. Lamson Engineering was a major worldwide provider of office equipment at this time, and added Dictograph to their range of products. The suggestion may have come from Lamsons that Dictograph should rent their systems rather than sell them outright, and spread the buyer's cost over many years. By 1908 Dictograph systems rented from as little as five dollars and fifty cents a month for one master console and five stations. It was not an original idea. Companies in England such as General Electric had already launched into the rental market in the late 1890s , and the New System Private Telephone Company began in the late 1890s as well. Telephone Rentals began in 1902.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1198

Image of DICTAPHONE RECORDING MACHINE AND CYLINDER, 1940's

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DICTAPHONE RECORDING MACHINE AND CYLINDER, 1940's

Dictaphone was an American company, that produced sound recording devices most commonly used to record speech for later playback, or to be typed into print. The name "Dictaphone" is a trademark, but in some places it has also become a common way to refer to all such devices.

The name "Dictaphone" was trademarked by the Columbia Graphophone Company in 1907, they soon became the leading manufacturer of such devices.

After relying on wax cylinder recording through to the end of World War II, in 1947 Dictaphone introduced their Dictabelt technology, which cut a mechanical groove into a plastic belt instead of into a wax cylinder. This was later replaced by magnetic tape recording and eventually hard-drive recording.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1189

Image of GRUNDIG EN3 DICTATION POCKET RECORDER AND TAPE, 1960's

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GRUNDIG EN3 DICTATION POCKET RECORDER AND TAPE, 1960's

The Grundig EN3 is an early attempt to put all the functions required of a voice memo recorder in one box. It's a truly hand-held machine, somewhat larger than a modern mobile phone.

The microphone is plugged directly into the top of the machine and includes an integral recording level meter. The tape is controlled by a single red lever, just visible in the photo on the left of the machine. The three AA batteries are hidden under the tape cassette.

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A1276

Image of ADANA PRINTING PRESS, 1950's

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ADANA PRINTING PRESS, 1950's

Production of the range of Adana machines was between 1935 and the 1950's, and the 'Adana Agency' was founded in 1922 in Twickenham by Donald Affleck Aspinall Adana. All the machines were destined for the amateur market.

Up to 40 sheets can be printed on these machines in one minute by an inexperienced operator, once the type has been placed and put onto the machine.

Type is held in place by a box frame called a 'Chase' using blank spacers called 'Quoins' to pack out the complete area. When printing rollers move up onto a round disk covered in ink which revolves slightly on every press of the handle. Once the ink is on the 'form' (the completed 'Chase') the bed holding the paper ('Platen') to be printed is pressed hard onto the 'Form' and then removed after the handle returns to its rest position.

The 85 refers to the size of the flat bed on which the type set is placed - 8 x 5 inch. This machine was made after 1953 and cost £16.80.

Donated by Mrs Kathleen Williams, this printing press belonged to Kathleen's late husband, it was in constant use.

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A0935

Image of PHILIPS FLASH UNIT, 1950's

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PHILIPS FLASH UNIT, 1950's

Philips Flash unit with an adaptor for the new PF1 cap-less flash bulb, shown in the foreground, with the adaptor removed the unit takes a bayonet type bulb (fitted). Together with the original Bijou 3volt battery's.

Donated by Mr T Angove

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A1516

Image of VICTORIAN WHOLE PLATE CAMERA, 1900's

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VICTORIAN WHOLE PLATE CAMERA, 1900's

Since 1851 professional photographers used these cameras in their studios, once the process of glass plate negatives had been perfected. Other sizes of plate were half and quarter plate which were used by wealthy amateurs because of their convenient size.

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A0716

Image of KODAK VEST POCKET CAMERA, 1914

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KODAK VEST POCKET CAMERA, 1914

This type of Camera was taken into the Battlefields during WW1. Up to 1916 all photography on the front line was forbidden. The only pictures obtained were smuggled out, the government was trying to prevent the people at home from realising the true horrors. Later reporters and photography was accepted, these cameras were small enough to conceal in a soldiers kit, and were common for the time.

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A0456

Image of WW1 STEREOSCOPE

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WW1 STEREOSCOPE

When viewed through a stereoscope pictures appear as 3D.To create this effect two pictures are taken with a dual camera (Stereo) at the same time. The photos shown here are of images taken during the First World War, they can be viewed with this device.

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A0999

Image of PATHESCOPE BABY CINE CAMERA, 1926

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PATHESCOPE BABY CINE CAMERA, 1926

Cine Camera where the developed films would be shown on Projector item A0906.
9.5 mm film is an amateur film format introduced by Pathé Frères in 1922 as part of the Pathé Baby amateur film system. It was conceived initially as an inexpensive format to provide copies of commercially-made films to home users, although a simple camera was released shortly afterwards.
It became very popular in Europe over the next few decades and is still used by a small number of enthusiasts today. Over 300,000 projectors were produced and sold mainly in France and England, and many commercial features were available in the format.

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A1108

Image of VAN NECK PRESS CAMERA, 1940's

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VAN NECK PRESS CAMERA, 1940's

Van Neck Press camera originally from the 1940's with Kodak wooden Dark slide unit containing room for two 9 X12cm (4.25X5.25 inch) glass plates. The camera has a 6'' (roughly 152mm) Ross Xpress lens f/4.5 uncoated in a lever-operated helical focusing mount, which is scaled from 2 to infinity in yards, the roller blind focal plane shutter has speeds from 1/10 to 1/1000 sec, plus a flash sync setting. On the top is a bracket for a folding reflector flash unit using a small flash bulb, and the connection is via two contact strips next to the flash bracket. These were hand made cameras heavy and durable, necessary for professional press photographers who carried no gadgets to help them with the shot distance and exposure, which were decided by experience. Even when a roll film attachment was provided for this camera the press photographer would still prefer the glass plates, as his darkroom was set up for these. On the back interchangeable with the slide unit, is mounted a screen and hood assembly used for focusing if necessary.

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A1478

Image of KOBOLD BC FLASH, 1960's

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KOBOLD BC FLASH, 1960's

In a period when the old Edison screw type flash bulbs were being replaced with the new miniature cap less types this unit was introduced to cope with both. With the added advantage of a capacitor to ensure guaranteed success, also a test light is provided which provides a sharp flash if the bulb and battery is in good order. A range of cables can be supplied to fit most types of camera. This unit has an old type bulb fitted and the new type with its adaptor in the foreground. Shown fitted to the Van Neck Press camera Item A1478.

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A1479

Image of FLASH BULB, 1950's

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FLASH BULB, 1950's

Early Flash Bulb, this has an Edison screw type cap. Instead of Magnesium wool this one uses Magnesium foil.

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A1019

Image of MAGNESIUM FLASH BULBS, 1960's

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MAGNESIUM FLASH BULBS, 1960's

Two Plug in Flash bulbs for domestic camera flash attachments.
Later versions removed the expensive bayonet cap, and replaced it with a plain glass base with two wires bent back to form a connection into a soft socket.
See Item A0950.

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A0714

Image of THORNTON- PICKARD JUNIOR SPECIAL, CAMERA, 1928

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THORNTON- PICKARD JUNIOR SPECIAL, CAMERA, 1928

The Thornton Pickard Junior Special Reflex Camera is a folding SLR for 3 1/2 × 4 1/2 " plates or roll film back.
It has a fast focal plane shutter with speeds from 1/10 to 1/1000 sec., and a fast 6" f4.5 lens. The lens may be a Ross Xpress or a Taylor-Hobson Cooke Anastigmat.
The camera is made of wood, covered with leather, and it has a revolving back. It's a heavy camera, weighing about 3 kg.

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A1312

Image of ZEISS IKON BABY BOX CAMERA 54/18, 1930's

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ZEISS IKON BABY BOX CAMERA 54/18, 1930's

Baby box cameras were started by Goerz in the 1930's and later taken over by Zeiss Ikon called the Tengor. Very popular with the masses as they were cheap and easy to use. This one is a 54/18 model with the Goerz lens, the shutter cannot be released unless the wire viewfinder is raised. Used 127 roll film.

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A1439

Image of KODAK BOX , 1930's

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KODAK BOX , 1930's

“Brownie” was the name of a long-running and extremely popular series of simple and inexpensive cameras made by Kodak, the first Brownie was introduced in 1900 and was made of cardboard, as is this one.

The Brownie popularized low-cost photography and introduced the concept of the snapshot.

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A0727

Image of KODAK 'BABY BROWNIE', 1934

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KODAK 'BABY BROWNIE', 1934

This was a later version of the “Box Brownie” A0727.

Kodak's Baby Brownie camera had a plastic Bakelite body instead of the metal one usually found on the Brownie range. It also had a folding range finder on the top and a rotary shutter.

This model of camera was produced in the USA between 1934 and 1941.

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A1040

Image of ZEISS IKON IKONTA BABY CAMERA 520/18, 1936

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ZEISS IKON IKONTA BABY CAMERA 520/18, 1936

The 520/18 is commonly referred to as the "Baby Ikonta". Apparently it was available from about 1932 until 1936. It was available with a 50/6.3 Novar, 50/4.5 Novar or 50/4.5 Tessar initially, and in 1936 with either a 50/3.5 Tessar or 50/3.5 Novar. These were very small and pocket-able, measuring only 4 inches (100mm) by 1.15 inch (30mm). Most examples found today show wear to the black paint trim, with the exposed metal showing signs of rust, from being carried around.

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A1438

Image of KODAK HAWKEYE ACE DE LUXE, CAMERA, 1938

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KODAK HAWKEYE ACE DE LUXE, CAMERA, 1938

This camera is slightly smaller than the Box Brownie, notice the metal frame to line up the shot.

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A1041

Image of ENSIGN  FUL-VUE  CAMERA, 1950

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ENSIGN FUL-VUE CAMERA, 1950

Getting away from the box style the ensign Ful-Vue of 1950 was modern in design and became very popular, replacing an earlier type of identical design but with a metal lens plate. Using 120 roll film, and nothing more than a simple shutter with a large reflector type viewfinder, it did however have an adjustable lens working from just 3 feet to infinity.

Donated by Mr & Mrs Jons

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A1363

Image of KODAK , 1950's

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KODAK , 1950's

The Kodak Brownie Six-20 was a viewfinder folding camera for making 6x9cm exposures on type No. 620 film rolls. There were two models, the first was produced in the UK by Kodak Ltd from 1937-1940 and the second from 1948-1954

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A1330

Image of KODAK BROWNIE FLASH 2 CAMERA AND CASE, 1957

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KODAK BROWNIE FLASH 2 CAMERA AND CASE, 1957

The Kodak Brownie Flash II, III and IV were box cameras, taking 2¼ × 3¼" exposures on type 620 film. Construction was of sheet metal, with plastic shutter-release button and advance knob; they were made by Kodak Ltd. in England from 1957-1960. The Brownie 2 has a close up lens position and 'B' (held) shutter facility.They were improved versions of the Brownie Models C, D, E, and F. Each was synchronised for flash with Kodak's screw-and-pin flash fitting on the opposite side to the controls. Fitted with Brownie Flash 5 unit. And pack of AG1 bulbs. The flash battery type B155 is also shown.

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A1449

Image of KODAK 'BROWNIE 127', 1950's

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KODAK 'BROWNIE 127', 1950's

This was another example of the “Brownie” series, it is made of Bakelite and was very easy to use.

Millions were sold between 1952 and 1967, the one shown was donated to the museum by its curator Rosie Hourihane, and was given to her by her father in 1955.

It has been well used and is still much loved.

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A0728

Image of ZORKI 4K 55mm CAMERA, 1950's

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ZORKI 4K 55mm CAMERA, 1950's

Zorki (Russian: Зоркий, meaning sharp-sighted) is the name of a series of 35mm range finder cameras manufactured in the Soviet Union between 1948 and 1978.
Zorki was a product of the Krasnogorsk Mechanical Factory (KMZ), which also produced the Zenit single lens reflex camera (SLR). The first Zorki cameras were inexpensive Leica II copies just like the FED

Donated by Mr & Mrs Jons

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A1361

Image of POLAROID 340 LAND CAMERA, 1969

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POLAROID 340 LAND CAMERA, 1969

The Polaroid Camera was invented in 1947 by Edwin Herbert Land (1909 – 1991)
Film for the Polaroid Cameras went out of production in 2007.

Edwin Land also invented the first inexpensive filters capable of polarizing light.

In the 1950’s Land helped design the optics that went into the Lockhead U.2 Spy Plane.

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A1126

Image of KODAK STERLING 2, CAMERA, 1955

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KODAK STERLING 2, CAMERA, 1955

Similar in style to the Kodak Junior I and II, this camera is slightly more sophisticated with its front-cell focusing lens in a four speed shutter with fully adjustable iris.

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A1279

Image of POLAROID LAND 1000 CAMERA , 1977

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POLAROID LAND 1000 CAMERA , 1977

The Land Camera 1000 is a foreign-markets version of the original Onestep model, meaning it has a fixed focus plastic lens. The model 1000 or original OneStep models are distinguished among the range in that they were made available with 2 different coloured shutter buttons - either green or red, a matching electronic flash was also released for the Onestep/1000 model, shown on top of the camera known as the Q-Light. It fits onto any SX-70 non-folding camera model, but was cosmetically matched to the original models. Also shown is a blank photo.

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A1282

Image of COSINA AF 35mm CAMERA, 1980's

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COSINA AF 35mm CAMERA, 1980's

Small pocket 35mm camera of the early 1980's. Many cameras were produced like this during this period, all with fixed lens and built in flash, with a short range of just 10 to 15 feet.

Donated by Mr & Mrs Jons

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A1360

Image of POLAROID , 1970's

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POLAROID , 1970's

There were a variety of models beginning in 1972 with the original SX-70, though all shared the same basic design. The first model, sold in Florida in late 1972, had a plain focusing screen (the user was expected to be able to see the difference between in- and out-of focus) because Dr. Land wanted to encourage photographers to think they were looking at the subject, rather than through a viewfinder. When many users complained that focusing was difficult, especially in dim light, Dr. Land was forced to include a split-image range finder prism of the kind used on 35mm SLR focusing screens. This feature is standard on the SX-70 Model 2.

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A0834

Image of ZENIT E RUSSIAN CAMERA, 1960's

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ZENIT E RUSSIAN CAMERA, 1960's

These cameras had a selenium photo cell meter built in, (for reference only) and were fully single lens reflex. When other SLR's were costing hundreds of pounds Dixons were selling them for just £30.
These were made with a metal body, therefore were very hard wearing.

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A0717

Image of LITTLE PRINCESS FLASH UNIT, 1960's

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LITTLE PRINCESS FLASH UNIT, 1960's

Uses 1 X 22.5 Volt hearing aid battery. These were sold as a separate item, not like nowadays when the flash is built into the camera.

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A0950

Image of OLYMPUS TRIP 35mm CAMERA, 1984

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OLYMPUS TRIP 35mm CAMERA, 1984

Olympus Trip 35mm Camera Purchased 23/06/1984.

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A0929

Image of KODAK 50 INSTAMATIC, 1963

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KODAK 50 INSTAMATIC, 1963

Common cartridge film pocket camera, The very first 126 camera ever to be marketed, the Instamatic 50 was introduced in the UK in February of 1963, a month before the Instamatic 100 hit the market. Indication inside the case states that this one was made in England.They were very easy to use, just point and click.

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A0206

Image of HANIMAX 110 CAMERA, 1960's

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HANIMAX 110 CAMERA, 1960's

Hanimax Pocket Camera for a 110 size cartridge film. Also shown is the flash unit used with the camera.

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A0826

Image of MINOLTA  DISC-7 CAMERA, 1983

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MINOLTA DISC-7 CAMERA, 1983

The Minolta Disc-7 Camera was one of a series of compact camera types that appeared around the 1980's, working with a disc of 15 exposures in a cover, once loaded the frame is advanced (turned) to the first frame, if the disc is removed before being fully exposed a frame is lost, but the other frames are still kept. The Camera has an internal battery that can only be changed by the Manufacturer, on the front is a curved mirror for self portrait use, it has two shutter speeds, built in flash and self timer, and f2.8 lens at 12.5mm focal length fixed focus with Macro mode. Exposure is automatic.

Donated by Sandra Taylor

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A1364

Image of MINOLTA POCKET AUTO PACK 70, 1973

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MINOLTA POCKET AUTO PACK 70, 1973

This camera takes a 16mm film cartridge, and uses magicubes,multi flash cubes, as shown. A very useful pocket size, made this camera very popular in the 70's.

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A1281

Image of FLASH CUBES, 1960's

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FLASH CUBES, 1960's

Two forms of Flash Cubes each with 4 flashes, they have two different mounting sockets for use with different types of camera.

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A0718

Image of VICTORIAN MAGIC LANTERN, 1900's

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VICTORIAN MAGIC LANTERN, 1900's

The large lens suggests that the magic lantern was used in theatres as it would need to be positioned a great distance from the screen. Illumination was by Carbon Arc (a high voltage such as ordinary mains voltage jumping between two carbon rods; a device was later incorporated to prevent overload). The slides were standard three and a quarter inch glass plates, often hand painted, or transparent positive photographs.

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A0119

Image of OPTIMUS MAGIC LANTERN, 1920's

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OPTIMUS MAGIC LANTERN, 1920's

The Magic Lantern or Lanterna Magica was the ancestor of the modern slide projector.
In the 19th century a thriving trade of projectionists travelled around the United Kingdom with their magic lanterns and a large number of slides to put on shows in towns and villages. Some of the slides came with special effects, by means of extra sections that could slide or rotate across the main plate. One of the most famous of these, very popular with children, was The Rat Swallower, where a series of rats would be seen leaping into a sleeping man's mouth. During the Napoleonic wars, a series was produced of a British ship's encounter with a French navy ship, ending patriotically with the French ship sinking in flames, accompanied by the cheers of the audience. The museum is able to demonstrate this Magic Lantern and is a great favourite with school children.

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A0121

Image of MAGIC LANTERN, 1930's

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MAGIC LANTERN, 1930's

This Magic Lantern has an electric lamp mounted inside that looks original, although it is possible it may have been converted by a professional from an earlier oil lamp. The Magic Lantern or Lanterna Magica was the ancestor of the modern slide projector.
The museum is able to demonstrate one of their Magic Lanterns and is always a great hit with school visits, the children can also handle some of the glass slides.

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A1232

Image of ELECTRIC FILM STRIP PROJECTOR, 1930's

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ELECTRIC FILM STRIP PROJECTOR, 1930's

This is a toy film projector with three small films. The films contained still pictures which had to be manually past behind the lens one picture at a time. A very sophisticated toy for the time.

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A1269

Image of JOHNSONS NO 12 PROJECTOR OPTISCOPE, 1940's

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JOHNSONS NO 12 PROJECTOR OPTISCOPE, 1940's

Slide Projector for three and quarter inch slides, in the photo you can see an extra lens.

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A0881

Image of GNOME ALPHAX MAJOR SLIDE PROJECTOR, 1970's

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GNOME ALPHAX MAJOR SLIDE PROJECTOR, 1970's

Photographic slide projector for single slides, two and one quarter inch square.

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A0939

Image of PATHESCOPE, 1930's

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PATHESCOPE, 1930's

In Britain, 9.5 mm film, projectors and cameras were distributed by Pathescope Ltd. During the years leading up to the Second World War, and for some years after the war, the gauge was used by enthusiasts who wanted to make home movies and to show commercially made films at home. Pathescope produced a large number of home versions of significant films, including Mickey Mouse and Betty Boop cartoons, classic features such as Alfred Hitchcock's Blackmail, and comedies by such well-known stars as Laurel and Hardy and Harold Lloyd

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A0906

Image of PAILLARD 9.5mm PROJECTOR & POWER UNIT OF 1932, 1930's

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PAILLARD 9.5mm PROJECTOR & POWER UNIT OF 1932, 1930's

The Paillard Model ‘P’ was introduced in 1932 and 9.5mm Film was introduced by Pathe’ Freres in 1922 for the amateur market. Initially intended as an inexpensive means of providing commercially made films for the home.
It became very popular in Europe over the following decades, and more than 300,000 projectors including the Model ‘P’ were sold in England and France, and many well known films produced in the 9.5mm format.
The film has a single perforation (sprocket hole) between each frame, unlike 8mm film which has holes along the edge. The single hole allows more room for the image, which is almost as large as on 16mm film. The width of 9.5 mm was chosen because three strips of film could be made from one strip of 35 mm film. This was useful when the films needed to be copied, as only one third of the length was needed then the 35mm copy could be cut into three strips and the sprocket holes added later.

Donated by David Martin

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A1531

Image of 6 X 9.5mm FILMS ON 170mm REELS, 1950's

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6 X 9.5mm FILMS ON 170mm REELS, 1950's

Various 9.5mm films on 170mm reels including cartoons Mickey Mouse, Popeye and Charlie Chaplin films.

Donated by David Martin

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A1530

Image of BOLEX PAILLARD H16 CINE CAMERA, 1935

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BOLEX PAILLARD H16 CINE CAMERA, 1935

The company E Paillard was founded in 1814 and produced watch movements and musical box mechanisms. It wasn’t until 1922 that they introduced the Pathe Baby film system using 9.5mm film. In 1928 the first 16mm camera under the name of Bolex was produced.

This model was made in 1952.

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A0932

Image of BELL AND HOWELL 624B  8MM CINE CAMERA, 1950's

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BELL AND HOWELL 624B 8MM CINE CAMERA, 1950's

Bell & Howell 624 cine cameras were manufactured in Britain by the Cine and Photographic Division of Rank Precision Industries Ltd. The original design was evolved by the Bell & Howell Co. of Chicago U.S.A. and although the American model numbers were different, the cameras had similar specifications.
The 624 cameras were made of light alloy, with winding handle and footage indicator on the right, spool chamber on the left and starting button on the front right-hand corner.
The knob provides for single frames, normal intermittent or continuous running.

This camera is a 624 Evolution Sundial model. It was first introduced into Britain in 1955. It has a single 10mm. lens with the aperture coupled to an exposure calculating dial on the camera front. In this way, exposure is set directly to the light conditions.

Separate optical adaptors were made available for the camera, for converting the standard lens to wide-angle and telephoto roles

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A0205

Image of AMPRO IMPERIAL PROJECTOR, 1950's

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AMPRO IMPERIAL PROJECTOR, 1950's

This Projector uses a 16mm film, and is made by Simplex Ampro Ltd. The museum has several 16mm films, they are very fragile.

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A0106

Image of EIKI ELF PROJECTOR, 1980's

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EIKI ELF PROJECTOR, 1980's

This 16mm Projector was used at Dacorum Collage Hemel Hempstead up until 2005, it was found discarded in a skip, by a local friend of the Museum, he recovered it and donated it to the museum, we know him as bearded John.

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A0941

Image of BELL & HOWELL CINE CAMERA, 1950's

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BELL & HOWELL CINE CAMERA, 1950's

Bell & Howell 624 cine cameras were manufactured in Britain by the Cine and Photographic Division of Rank Precision Industries Ltd. The original design was evolved by the Bell & Howell Co. of Chicago U.S.A. and although the American model numbers were different, the cameras had similar specifications.
The 624 cameras were made of light alloy, with winding handle and footage indicator on the right, spool chamber on the left and starting button on the front right-hand corner. The knob provides for single frames, normal intermittent or continuous running. There was a tripod bush in the base with a standard 1/4 in. Whitworth thread.

This camera is a 624 EE model. It was first introduced into Britain in the 1950's. It has a single 10mm. lens, also shown is an 8 mm film, this item is in excellent condition and the leather case is hardly marked.

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A1280

Image of SONY REEL TO REEL VIDEO RECORDER, 1969

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SONY REEL TO REEL VIDEO RECORDER, 1969

DV-2400 Reel to Reel Video Recorder. Known as the Portapak Video Rover, black and white Video recorder. With a maximum recording time of 20 minutes, the Sony ’Video Rover’ DV-2400 was one of the very first portable video tape recorder available to the general public. Sony Notes Below.
SONY CV-2400 Portapak
The Portable Battery Operated non EIAJ Skip Field

1967
Sony introduces the world's first portable VTR, the DV-2400.

The VIDEO ROVER, was the first video portapack. it offered the format of the time which was B/W, skip field, Pre-EIAJ, 1/2 inch tape, reel to reel. This first unit was a record ONLY portapak VTR outfit. Recording time was 20 minutes on 4-1/2 inch reel of 1/2 inch videotape. streamlined for size and weight you were provided a small hand crank that stored in the units lid for rewinding the tape!

Playback of tapes from this unit (after they were hand rewound) was accomplished on the CV-2000 series decks.

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A1379

Image of SONY TRINICON CAMERA, 1980's

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SONY TRINICON CAMERA, 1980's

A hand held camera Type HVC3000P for connection to a VCR, These cameras were connected with portable Betamax VCRs and used in the semi professional field such as high schools colleges and businesses and possibly low budget broadcasts.

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A1378

Image of SMITHS DARKROOM TIMER, 1950's

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SMITHS DARKROOM TIMER, 1950's

Well known wind up photographic darkroom timer used throughout the 1950's.

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A0112

Image of REVOX TAPE RECORDER G36, 1963

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REVOX TAPE RECORDER G36, 1963

In 1963 Several new distributors join Studer to market the Swiss tape recorders in many different countries. Production start of the famous Revox G36. It was sold to the UK market under the name of "Revox 736".
Reel to Reel Recorders using valves, and designed for semi-professional use in 1963 it cost 124 Guineas The REVOX 736 (G36) is a mono/stereo machine with stacked erase heads, separate recording heads separate replay heads, six audio pre-amplifiers. and a push/pull power amplifier. Tape speeds of 3 3/4 and 7 1/2 .i. p. s. are obtained by pole-changing the synchronous Papst capstan motor. Twin-track and four-track models are available, both fully stereo phonic, recording to the latest C.C.I.R. (DIN 45113) characteristic

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A1323

Image of PHLLIPS EL315/15 TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

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PHLLIPS EL315/15 TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

Popular tape recorder of the 1960's using 5inch reels of magnetic tape supplied with a crystal microphone.

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A0380

Image of KYOTO S600  8 TRACK  STEREO PLAYER, 1980's

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KYOTO S600 8 TRACK STEREO PLAYER, 1980's

The original format for magnetic tape sound reproduction was reel-to-reel audio tape recording, first made widely available in the late 1940s. However, threading tape into the recorders was more difficult than simply putting a disc record onto a phonograph player. Manufacturers introduced a succession of cartridges which held the tape inside a metal or plastic housing to eliminate handling. The first was RCA Victor, which in 1958 introduced a cartridge system called Sound Tape or Magazine Cartridge Loading, but until the introduction of the Compact Cassette in 1963 and Stereo 8 in 1965, none were very successful.

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A1277

Image of GRAMDECK CONVERSION FROM RECORD DECK TO TAPE RECORDER, 1950's

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GRAMDECK CONVERSION FROM RECORD DECK TO TAPE RECORDER, 1950's

This was placed on the turntable of a standard record player with a 78rpm, a small peg was mounted on the gramophone deck which located into the gramdec base to hold it steady. The cable attached was connected to the pre-amplifier supplied, and this was in turn connected to an audio power amplifier. A microphone was supplied which could be used via the pre-amplifier for recording. Cost 39 gns, RRP when first introduced.

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A1118

Image of ELIZABETHAN TAPE RECORDER DELUX WITH COLLARO DECK, 1961

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ELIZABETHAN TAPE RECORDER DELUX WITH COLLARO DECK, 1961

Early "Elizabethan" Tape Recorder using a well known Collaro Tape deck.

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A1129

Image of STANDARD TINY PAL RECORDER, 1960's

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STANDARD TINY PAL RECORDER, 1960's

Early pre Cassette recorder for domestic use, although it states Double Track it is not stereo, it simply refers to the possibility of turning the tape over.

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A0166

Image of SONY WALKMAN, 1980's

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SONY WALKMAN, 1980's

Portable cassette player that was small enough to fit into a pocket, famous from 1979.

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A0928

Image of AGAPHONE WIRE RECORDER, 1950's

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AGAPHONE WIRE RECORDER, 1950's

Wire recorders were invented in Denmark by Valdimar Poulson for an answering machine in 1898 called a Telegraphone, but were not developed for any other practical purpose at the time. Ten years later a company in America made a successful dictation machine. They were quickly made obsolete by magnetic tape machines.

Although this machine carries the trade name Agaphone, this unit was certainly made by another company

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A0100

Image of WEBSTER CHICAGO WIRE RECORDER MODEL 180-1 of 1949

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WEBSTER CHICAGO WIRE RECORDER MODEL 180-1 of 1949

Formed in 1914 the Webster Electrical Corp specialised in consumer Audio products up until the 1960's. The Chicago Model 180-1 Electronic Memory wire recorder of 1949 used 0.0036-inch Stainless steel wire travelling at 24 inches per second past a head moving vertically to spread the wire evenly on to the take up spool. The Quality on some models was exceptionally good. In 1952 Webster started production on tape machines, and also started using the trade name Webcor. Webster ceased trading in the 1960's due to competition from foreign imports.

Donated by Jonathan Bell

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A1537

Image of BOOSEY & HAWKS WIREK TYPE 'A' WIRE RECORDER , 1945

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BOOSEY & HAWKS WIREK TYPE 'A' WIRE RECORDER , 1945

Boosey and Hawkes stopped making machines and only produced sheet music after this model.
Valdemar Poulsen, a Danish inventor developed the "Telegraphone" between 1898 -1900 this was a magnetic method using steel wire
Wire recorders were developed in the period from 1900 to the late 1940s, but they were produced only in very small quantities.
They were used by BBC journalists during WWII.
The peak of the wire recorder's short commercial life came in 1948 and 1949.

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A0973

Image of WIRE RECORDER No2 IN CONTAINER, 1940's

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WIRE RECORDER No2 IN CONTAINER, 1940's

Wire for use on wire recorders which were used before tape recording was invented in Germany during WW2. See Item A0973 and A1537.

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A1529

Image of SIMON SOUND SP/2 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1957

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SIMON SOUND SP/2 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1957

Simon Sound Service Ltd London W1. This was used with the ribbon microphone Item A0934.

Donated by Mr P Holmes

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A0933

Image of FERROGRAPH SERIES 6 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

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FERROGRAPH SERIES 6 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

The Ferrograph was semi professional machine seen many times in films and used by the BBC.

This version of the Series 6 is a half track stereo machine with 8.25 inch reels and using standard 1/4 inch tape. A quarter track version was available. It had three motors, two used for fast forward, rewind and back tension and one, a split phase capacitor induction motor, for the flywheel and capstan. This type of motor is almost immune to small variations in voltage or load and is controlled by the mains frequency after reaching its synchronous speed. Three speeds were provided 7.5, 3.75, and 1.125 inches/second. It was extremely heavy using valve amplification and built on a sturdy frame.

The companies Wright and Weare first produced machines in the late forties and eventually introduced the famous Wearite deck seen here

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A0781

Image of VEHICLE IGNITION COIL, 1930's

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VEHICLE IGNITION COIL, 1930's

Induction or Vibrator Coil which we think is an early ignition coil, there are no makers marks. Produces a healthy 15mm spark from 12 volts. Nothing more is known about this coil.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1533

Image of C.A.V. 6 VOLT 18 WATT VEHICLE BULB, 1940

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C.A.V. 6 VOLT 18 WATT VEHICLE BULB, 1940

Vehicle light bulb 6 Volt 18 Watt with single point bayonet fitting, distributed by C.A.V. and made by Royal Ediswan Type 723. With original box.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1511

Image of NMC VEHICLE CIGARETTE LIGHTER, 1950's

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NMC VEHICLE CIGARETTE LIGHTER, 1950's

Attaches to the dash of your car, and wired to the fuse box. The compartment is filled with cigarettes and closed, when a cigarette is needed, a button is pressed on the right which warms a small element wired around a Mica strip on the left, when the cigarette starts to glow it is removed and consumed. How the next cigarette does not ignite before the element has cooled is not clear, but it is assumed that this does not happen.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1509

Image of THE  'NOBBY' UNDER CAR HEATER, 1930's

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THE 'NOBBY' UNDER CAR HEATER, 1930's

During the fist 40 years of motoring cars would be difficult to start on cold frosty mornings, one solution was to leave a small heater under the engine overnight, just enough to keep the frost away. This is the solution 'The Nobby Under Car Heater' with a fine mesh to prevent fire, the car would usually start eventually.

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A1458

Image of 'SET RIGHT' FARE REGISTER TICKET MACHINE, 1950's

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'SET RIGHT' FARE REGISTER TICKET MACHINE, 1950's

Bus Conductors Ticket Machine for the Glasgow Bus Company used up until the Conductors on buses were removed, and replaced with drivers/fare collectors.

Pat No. 343119/5869

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A0831

Image of 1906-1920, VEHICLE DEMONSTRATION BOARD, 1906's

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1906-1920, VEHICLE DEMONSTRATION BOARD, 1906's

Demonstration board with ignition switch, ammeter light switch, headlamp marked CAV dated 1906, rear lamp, side lamp, two trafficators and working spark plug with generator, and model distributor. Also a Delarelle cigarette lighter.

This board can be demonstrated, the trafficators are the most popular item, and always invoke very happy memories from our visitors.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1179

Image of CAR CUT OUT 6 VOLTS, 1930's

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CAR CUT OUT 6 VOLTS, 1930's

This is a small relay to disconnect the car battery when the dynamo is not running, this would prevent the battery discharging through the dynamo.

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A0327

Image of VIBRATOR UNIT FOR POWER SUPPLY, 1950's

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VIBRATOR UNIT FOR POWER SUPPLY, 1950's

The vibrator unit was used to increase the battery voltage of a vehicle to the high tension voltages needed to work valves.Together with a step up transformer, voltages in excess of 100 volts could be obtained. Units like this were common in Car Radios and Military Transceivers of the period. The unit has been cut away to show the contacts and coil inside.

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A0325

Image of BOSCH SPARK PLUG, 1914

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BOSCH SPARK PLUG, 1914

Early spark plug for Petrol Engines.

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A0326

Image of SIRRAM  ELECTRIC CAR KETTLE, 1950's

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SIRRAM ELECTRIC CAR KETTLE, 1950's

Electric Kettle part of a picnic set, working from 12 volts and connected to a standard cigarette lighter socket in the car.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1238

Image of BREVETEE CAR HORN, 1900's

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BREVETEE CAR HORN, 1900's

Early vehicle horn with a diaphragm mounted at the bottom of a shallow horn, driven by a 6 volt coil and a circuit breaker.
This item can be demonstrated, along with a number of other vehicle items.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1217

Image of WWII LUCAS HEAD LAMP COVER

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WWII LUCAS HEAD LAMP COVER

Covers for car headlamps were made compulsory during Wartime. All the light was not only reduced but also directed downwards.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1173

Image of CARBIDE LAMP, 1930's

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CARBIDE LAMP, 1930's

A small tablet Calcium Carbide CaC2 is placed in the reservoir in the base, tap water is placed in a chamber above, this is released onto the tablet, on contact with water the tablet will fizz producing acetylene gas, C2H2 which is ignited at the burner. The rate of flow of the water can be controlled to give varying amounts of light. When the tablet has been exhausted the unit has to be cleaned before being reused.

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A0214

Image of VICTORIAN CARRIAGE LAMP

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VICTORIAN CARRIAGE LAMP

Probably for use with a candle, although the holder is missing, and has been replaced with a miniature bayonet cap lamp holder.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1209

Image of UNDER CAR HEATER, 1930's

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UNDER CAR HEATER, 1930's

Car heater placed near the engine to prevent frost.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1174

Image of FORD IGNITION COIL OR VIBRATOR COIL (BUZZ COIL), 1920's

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FORD IGNITION COIL OR VIBRATOR COIL (BUZZ COIL), 1920's

Henry Ford was 40 years old when he founded the Ford Motor Company, which would go on to become one of the world's largest and most profitable companies, as well as being one to survive the Great Depression.
These coils used on the model 'T' were possibly made by a sub contractor to Fords the K-W Ignition Company 32 Power Avenue Cleveland Ohio, or the Kokomo Electric co, this particular version was made between 1917 and 1919 and cost $1.29 1n the 1920's. One coil per cylinder was needed, the timing achieved by a contacts on the cam shaft, later one master coil with vibrator and three additional slave coils were used. The connections on the side are studs so that the unit can be slide into a box with spring connections, and are marked (top) 'B' Battery 'S' Spark, and on the end 'T' for Timing. All coils were powered by 6 volts, from a dry battery as chargeable types were not yet commercially available, or by a Magneto Generator, also made by K-W among others. The coil design dates back to 1902 when Ed Huff assisted Ford with his ignition problems used on earlier vehicles.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1283

Image of HMV MODEL 1121 WIRELESS, 1950's

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HMV MODEL 1121 WIRELESS, 1950's

Made after 1950 with four bands, two short wave, Long and Medium, switchable tone control and four separate glass scales one for each band. Mains only operation, and requiring an external Aerial and Earth connection. Price new not known.

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A1460

Image of WW2 HRO MARCONI WORKERS WIRELESS (RADIO), 1940's

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WW2 HRO MARCONI WORKERS WIRELESS (RADIO), 1940's

Made during WW2 for factory workers possibly at Chelmsford and assembled from a National HRO chassis. The tuning gearbox and chassis is black indicating an early HRO, also the crystal section and I.F. coils are original. Instead of a plug in coil section a permanent set of coils has been installed behind a blank panel, a wave change switch is included for Long and Medium wave only. The set might have been made by an employee of Marconi as there is no Manufacturers mark although the set is professionally made, only a large 'M' across the speaker. It was donated to the Museum with verbal provenance relating to its origin. No other information is known.

Donated by Marconi Museum

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A1366

Image of ROBERTS R66 MAINS BATTERY VALVE PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

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ROBERTS R66 MAINS BATTERY VALVE PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

Employing a Ferrite rod internal aerial the R66 is a 2 band 4 valve portable designed to operate from All Dry batteries or AC mains. Wavebands covered are 182-580 Meters and 900-2000 Metres. In April 1956 it cost £13-19-6d Batteries and Purchase Tax Extra.

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A1340

Image of EVER READY SKY KING PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

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EVER READY SKY KING PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

The Sky Queen was for the Ladies, the Sky King for the gent's. Medium and Long wave only. Battery: Ever Ready B136 (combined HT 90v & LT 1.5v). Original price: £10 - plus taxes and batteries

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A1339

Image of EVER READY SKY BARONET PORTABLE RADIO, 1958

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EVER READY SKY BARONET PORTABLE RADIO, 1958

Ever Ready made portable wireless's until 1968 when they reverted to making batteries only, this model was made in 1958. Original price £14 7s 3d (included batteries and taxes) The Sky Baronet followed the Sky Princess and has a similar lid to the case but employed a Printed circuit chassis, instead of a hand wired metal type.

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A1338

Image of EVER READY SKY PRINCESS PORTABLE RADIO, 1956

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EVER READY SKY PRINCESS PORTABLE RADIO, 1956

Ever Ready made portable wireless's until 1968 when they reverted to making batteries only, this model was made in July 1956. Cost £10-10s Batteries and Purchase Tax extra. A 2 band All Dry battery portable 4 valves, the wavebands are 192-550 Metres and 1040-1765 metres.

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A1337

Image of PHILCO TORCH RADIO MODEL 3782, 1956

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PHILCO TORCH RADIO MODEL 3782, 1956

Philco portable mains battery valve Radio of 1956, with a torch embedded in the tuning knob on the side. The sales literature states ''Powerful built in torch. 3 Bands Long Medium and Maritime. Choice of four colours. AC/DC Mains operation. Cost in 1956 18 Gns Tax Paid''. Uses four miniature valves, DK92, DF91, DAF91, DL94.

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A1334

Image of WIRELESS LICENCE, 1930

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WIRELESS LICENCE, 1930

The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on 18 October 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom and licensed by the British General Post Office.

On 31 December 1926, the company was dissolved and its assets were transferred to the non-commercial and Crown Chartered British Broadcasting Corporation.

The BBC had to be paid for by public subscription ie listeners were required an annual licence.
All manufactures were legally bound to obtain a licence from the Post Master General, before producing their Wireless Sets.

The licence shown was issued to Thomas George Morris Asquith 93 Vale of Heath Road, Port Tenarth, on the 15 of January 1930, Cost 10 Shillings.

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A0149

Image of HMV COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE, 1937

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HMV COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE, 1937

Hallmarked silver plaque given to 'The Totland Bay Garage' in 1937 to:

"Commemorate your association with "His Masters Voice" during Coronation Year".

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A1046

Image of BREADBOARD TYPE PORTABLE WIRELESS SET BCM/CWC, 1920's

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BREADBOARD TYPE PORTABLE WIRELESS SET BCM/CWC, 1920's

Portable receiver of unknown make marked BCM/CWC, built on a wooden board and hand wired known as breadboard construction, although portable it required three batteries HT, LT, and Grid Bias, with a good aerial and earth.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1182

Image of 'VULCAN' 2 VALVE BREADBOARD  WIRELESS SET, 1925

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'VULCAN' 2 VALVE BREADBOARD WIRELESS SET, 1925

Breadboard wireless with 2 valves, it requires headphones or High Impedance speaker for listening and three batteries, it would also require at least one hundred feet of aerial and a good earth.

Made by J.G.Graves,Hallamgate Works, Crookes Rd, Sheffield ,South Yorkshire, in 1925. The radio was called the 'VULCAN' and came complete
with 90volt HT battery, 2volt accumulator, Grid Bias battery, Loudspeaker, Aerial cable with insulators,rope halyard and pulley, and lead-in tube (all missing) and connecting leads, all for £7-17-6d

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1199

Image of CLYNE RADIO SUPERIOR 4  WIRELESS SET, 1966

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CLYNE RADIO SUPERIOR 4 WIRELESS SET, 1966

Supplied as a kit, complete with instruction book and original receipt.
Cost £6-9s-6d PT 2s-6d

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A0152

Image of BRANDSET 2 CANADIAN BRANDS WIRELESS, 1924

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BRANDSET 2 CANADIAN BRANDS WIRELESS, 1924

Two valve TRF receiver made by the Brandes Corporation in Canada 1924, similar sets were made in Slough England, and a later model the 3A was launched around 1929 with 3 valves.
The set requires 3 Batteries and listening is done via headphones of which the Brandes version are shown, the headband is missing.
No more is known about these sets.

Nortel Collection

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A1321

Image of KOLSTER-BRANDS 'MASTERPIECE' RECEIVER, 1932

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KOLSTER-BRANDS 'MASTERPIECE' RECEIVER, 1932

Only 40,000 "Masterpiece" wireless sets were made and were given away free in exchange for coupons from packets of cigarettes in 1930.

The cigarettes in question were "Best Dark Virginia", and in order to qualify for a free radio, it was necessary to spend over £12 which would have purchased 500 packets of ten.

At that time the price of receivers was very high, because of a protection scheme run by a cartel of British manufacturers.
The valves that were used had to be British, and the royalties had to be paid to the Marconi Company and the BBC.

The sale of cheap foreign imports was banned but giving them away "free" wasn't, so this loophole was exploited in order to sell more cigarettes.

The receivers were made by KB but cheap imported valves were supplied by the tobacco company.

The KB shown here is one of the earliest Bakelite-cased models and is an extremely neat design using a TRF circuit around a couple of 2-volt valves. The lid which carries the loudspeaker hinges up to reveal the tuning and reaction controls.
Unfortunately although the receiver is very small, the batteries were standard and had to be employed externally to the set.
This changed the neat receiver into a bit of a messy affair with its trailing leads and collection of batteries.

Nortel Collection

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A1315

Image of KOLSTER BRANDS (TOASTER RADIO) FB10, 1950's

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KOLSTER BRANDS (TOASTER RADIO) FB10, 1950's

Kolster Brands FB10, was known as The Toaster Radio, in September 1950 it cost £8.17s.1d, it was usually kept in the kitchen and looked just like a toaster.

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A0804

Image of MARCONI 706 5 INCH TV/WIRELESS, 1939

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MARCONI 706 5 INCH TV/WIRELESS, 1939

Although appearing complete and to show how the TV would look in 1939, the tube is a later radar type and the scan coils are missing. This was one of Marconi's first Televisions.

John Ambrose collection

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A0846

Image of PYE B18T TELEVISION, 1948

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PYE B18T TELEVISION, 1948

The first AC/DC Television single band only.
In January 1949 this TV would have cost 49 Guineas.

John Ambrose collection

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A0847

Image of PYE LV30C TELEVISION, 1950

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PYE LV30C TELEVISION, 1950

The Pye LV30C single channel Television (BBC only) , first sold in June 1950 for £38.11s.8d PT extra.

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A0375

Image of BUSH TV12A TELEVISION, 1949

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BUSH TV12A TELEVISION, 1949

This was the first Television set made with a bakelite case, it has a 9 inch screen. Magnifiers could be puchased that were filled with liquid, these were strapped to the front of the TV to magnify the size of the picture. In April 1949 the TV12 cost £41.3s.1d PT extra.

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A0374

Image of SINCLAIR MICROVISION TV MODEL TV1B, 1978

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SINCLAIR MICROVISION TV MODEL TV1B, 1978

The Microvision TV1B was launched in the autumn of 1978, it was 4 inch x 6 inch and 1.5 inch high. Its predecessor the TV1A sold for around £230.00, it weighed 26 oz; this made it ounce for ounce more expensive than Silver. The picture could be viewed from a foot away. Functioning on VHF and UHF bands, it was the world’s first multi-standard receiver.

Donated by Allen Robert

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A1023

Image of TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

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TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

Small Television screen magnifier. This was filled with liquid and strapped onto the television to magnify the size of the picture, it did however create some distortion. Many visitors to the museum remember using one of these.

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A0378

Image of TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

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TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

A small Television screen magnifier, this one is tinted pink. It was filled with liquid and strapped onto the television to magnify the size of the picture, this would cause some distortion.

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A0377

Image of BUSH DAC90, 1947

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BUSH DAC90, 1947

The DAC 90 cost £11 gns in July 1946 and was replaced by the DAC 90A in Feb 1950.

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A0148

Image of BUSH DAC90A, 1950

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BUSH DAC90A, 1950

In Feb 1950 the DAC90A Cost £12. 1s 8d purchase tax extra. It replaced the DAC90.
This was one of the most popular sets ever made, and is still in use today.
They are often seen at fairs, the Bakelite polishes up beautifully.

Donated by Ernest Richards

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A1010

Image of BUSH DAC91, 1947

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BUSH DAC91, 1947

This is the version that superceded the DAC 90,normally an expanded metal grille is fitted. Released May 1947 Price £17. 17. 03d including Purchase tax. Same as the DAC90 but without the internal frame Arial, (Required an external Arial ) and it has a cream plastic speaker grill.

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A1115

Image of BUSH VHF 90 WIRELESS, 1956

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BUSH VHF 90 WIRELESS, 1956

The Bush VHF 90 was made in 1956, This unit was given to a Mrs Allner by the British Wireless for the Blind Fund. It has only Medium Wave and VHF FM Bands, and it cost in July 1956 £16.12s.08d Purchase tax extra. The set has an internal aerial for VHF and AM,and a possible external VHF connection. These sets were AC/DC meaning, there is no transformer inside, therefore no isolation from the mains, such sets are not now made for this reason, it also has an aluminium chassis making it lighter but more expensive, most chassis for sets of this type are made of steel. For more information see trader Sheet 1293.

Donated by Mr Edward Allner

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A1403

Image of DAVENSET BATTERY CHARGER, 1930's

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DAVENSET BATTERY CHARGER, 1930's

Usually found in Garages or Cycle shops for charging Wireless Accumulators. Supplying 20 Volts, it can charge 10 X Accumulators at one time. Davenset Chargers are still made today.
All the museum trutees can remember their parents taking an Accumulator to be re-charged.

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A0115

Image of BTH CRYSTAL SET AND BBC HEADPHONES, 1920's

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BTH CRYSTAL SET AND BBC HEADPHONES, 1920's

This is the BTH Type 'C' Form 'A' twin detector crystal set manufactured by British Thomson Houston Ltd. in 1924. It bears the BBC/Post Master General stamp marked with the GPO Reg. No. 106.* The lid carries the instructions for use. The date of manufacture is printed in the lower left corner of the instruction card. This crystal set was manufactured by BTH from 1922 through to 1925.
*All manufactures were legally bound to obtain a licence from the Post Master General, before producing their Wireless Sets.

The set is housed in a walnut cabinet and features variometer tuning, twin cats whisker detectors and selectable aerial coupling.

A variometer is a rotary variable inductance typically used for aerial tuning

Nortel Collection

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A1318

Image of S G BROWN AMPLIFIER, 1924

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S G BROWN AMPLIFIER, 1924

Known as the 'Brown Microphone Amplifier' it was initially designed to amplify telephone signals,although called a microphone amplifier it is not used with a microphone, this refers to the working mechanism which is purely mechanicle. In the 1920's a license was required for valve equipment, this unit cost half the fee. A wireless set or crystal receiver could be connected to these units and enough power could be produced to enhance the sound considerably. With a six volt battery to power the unit it would consume less power than an equivelent two valve system. In 1924 this model for valve sets cost £5.5s.0d.

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A0312

Image of OSRAM MUSIC MAGNET WIRELESS, 1929

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OSRAM MUSIC MAGNET WIRELESS, 1929

Sold as a kit using the trade name GECophone in 1929, it has a metal chssis and front panel with oak end panels and lift up lid. It is a battery set and has 3 valves. There are two waveband coils six condensors, an L.F. transformer and little else. Requiring headphones aerial and earth.

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A0159

Image of BREAD BOARD 6 VALVE RECEIVER, 1930's

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BREAD BOARD 6 VALVE RECEIVER, 1930's

Many small companies sprung up in the 1920's making wireless sets for sale. These unfortunately soon suffered from the large companies going into mass production and flooding the market. This receiver has six valves four of which are RF amplifiers, Long Medium and Short wave making it ambitious, as Superhetrodynes had not yet become widely available,so much amplification must have produced a lot of unwanted noise. A label on the set says Made by J.Karslake & Son 264 High street, opposite the Post Office. Exeter 2510.
The coils inside are Wearite types, carefully matched for three stages of a TRF or "straight" receiver
The cans are copper and the coils plug into standard B4 valve sockets.
The covers were vital for a stable receiver so that there was no unwanted coupling between the amplifying stages.

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A0144

Image of FRAME AERIAL FOR LONG AND MEDIUM WAVE, 1930's

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FRAME AERIAL FOR LONG AND MEDIUM WAVE, 1930's

Many houses in built up areas did not have gardens large enough to acommodate an aerial, (flats had no gardens) so an aerial for a receiver was a problem. The frame aerial provided some help, mounted on the top of the set, it could provide some signal strength, but not as good as an outdoor aerial.

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A0145

Image of GECOPHONE BC 3050 RECEIVER, 1920's

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GECOPHONE BC 3050 RECEIVER, 1920's

The item shown is a single valve receiver made by GEC using a HE3 Valve.

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A0143

Image of IVELEK CRYSTAL SET, 1950's

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IVELEK CRYSTAL SET, 1950's

Advertized in Exchange and Mart and other periodicals, and aimed at young enthusiasts. Museum staff remember listening to radio Luxemburg on these sets in the 50's and 60'S.
Radio Luxembourg was a Long Wave commercial radio station that began broadcasting from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in 1933.

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A0142

Image of VIDOR 'MY LADY ANNE' PORTABLE, 1955

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VIDOR 'MY LADY ANNE' PORTABLE, 1955

Model CN430 Released Date Jan 1955 Cost £14.14s.2d PT Extra

The "My Lady" range of wireless sets became very popular in the 50's, they came different colours and were very much in demand by the teenagers of the day.

Donated by Kenneth Thompson

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A1034

Image of MARCONI P20B PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1948

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MARCONI P20B PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1948

In December 1948 the P20B cost £11.19s. 6d Plus Purchase Tax

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A1048

Image of HONEYTONE POCKET TRANSISTOR MICRO 7, 1960's

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HONEYTONE POCKET TRANSISTOR MICRO 7, 1960's

Seven Transistor Miniature Pocket Radio, popular in the 1960's.
This really is very small and does fit into a pocket quite easily, compared to the Selecta Portable item A0147 40 years earlier, things had come a long way.

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A0153

Image of EVER READY 'B' or MARCONI PHONE P17B, 1947

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EVER READY 'B' or MARCONI PHONE P17B, 1947

Made by the Marconiphone Company in June 1947, it cost 10 Gns. Also supplied by Ever Ready who had developed a small battery incorporating HT and LT sections specifically for sets like this . This was advertised as a handbag portable wireless.

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A0151

Image of MARCONI 382, 1936

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MARCONI 382, 1936

In September 1936 this wireless set would cost £14.3s.6d
It's big and heavy and built to last, as it has done.

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A0160

Image of SELECTA PORTABLE RECEIVER, 1920's

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SELECTA PORTABLE RECEIVER, 1920's

Large early portable receiver, made in 1929, with four valves and space for HT Battery and LT accumulator.Required a good aerial and earth, a hand written list inside the front doors gives all the control settings for various stations. Tuning was accomplished by plain amplification T.R.F. (Tuned Radio Frequency). In 1929 it cost £33.12s.0d. On the inside back panel is a meter to indicate the charge state of the accumulator. Also available as a suit case portable, and a mains version.

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A0147

Image of BROWNIE NO 2 CRYSTAL SET, 1920's

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BROWNIE NO 2 CRYSTAL SET, 1920's

The number 2 was manufactured by the Brownie Wireless Co. of Great Britain Ltd. The set was available from September 1925 and appears in the 1925/6 Catalogue of the East London Rubber Company. Described as,

"Complete with Semi-Opal Protected Detector, D.L.5 Crystal and "Pallmadium" Cats whisker".

It sold for 10/6 (10 shillings and six pre-decimal pence), or 52.5 pence in today's terms, This price was very competitive, cheap alongside other models of the time, which might have cost in the region of £1 to £5.

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A0785

Image of ASTRAD ORION MICRO POCKET WIRELESS, 1968

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ASTRAD ORION MICRO POCKET WIRELESS, 1968

Made around 1968 and costing £2-10s-00d, this is really tiny and was announced as the world smallest Radio, it has two dials and a crystal earpeice in a plastic case.

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A0943

Image of HMV HYBRID WIRELESS, 1958

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HMV HYBRID WIRELESS, 1958

During the change over to fully transistorized radio, it was easier to use transistors in the output stage,as these were expensive at the time, and still use valves in the high frequency stages, . Using transistors in the output section would have reduced power consumption on batteries.

Donated by Geoff Morgan

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A0872

Image of ETRONIC WIRELESS ETA 521, 1940's

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ETRONIC WIRELESS ETA 521, 1940's

Wood Cased Wireless with rotating needle dial, Mains only, no information has been found out about this item.

Donated by Mr Edwards

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A0924

Image of PROPAGANDA NAZI WIRELESS, 1938

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PROPAGANDA NAZI WIRELESS, 1938

Made during WW2 and tuned to German local frequencies only. Known as 'Die Goebbelsschnauze' ( The Goebbels Gob ) This is the Deutscher Kleinempfänger DKE38 made by G. Schaub in Germany around 1938. It is has 1 valve (plus rectifier) and is a mains TRF receiver housed in a brown bakelite cabinet.

Deutscher Kleinempfänger means 'German small receiver', and the DKE38 is a low cost peoples-set designed for mass production and intended to be introduced into as many German homes as possible, very much like the utility sets that were in UK homes during the Second World War. It was intended for the communication of German propaganda and was manufactured by a number of manufacturers. Like the utility sets,
its design is simple and whilst it would have been adequate for receiving strong local stations, it would have required a good aerial. Many of the parts used in this set are marked with the German eagle.

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A0086

Image of EDDYSTONE EB35  COMMUNICATION RECEIVER, 1968

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EDDYSTONE EB35 COMMUNICATION RECEIVER, 1968

This is a domestic receiver of 1968 receiving AM and FM with 6 bands, fully transistorised and used by wireless amateurs in the early 1970,s operating from battery or mains. It used Germanium transistors which suffer badly with age, it is unlikely that any of these sets will still work without major repair. the ranges were 88-108 FM, AM 8.5-22MHz, 3.5-8.5MHz, 1.5-3.5MHz, 550-1500Khz, 150-350Khz.

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A0110

Image of EDDYSTONE COMMUNICATION RECEIVER S640, 1947

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EDDYSTONE COMMUNICATION RECEIVER S640, 1947

Desk top Receiver in metal case. Designed as a communication set for wireless amateurs. In 1947 this would have cost £42.00 A 3 band general coverage set HF 1.7-31MHz.Using an EF39 in the RF stage.

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A0967

Image of MURPHY A122M, 1949

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MURPHY A122M, 1949

In January 1949 the Murphy A122M cost £22.00 Purchase Tax extra.
This is beautifully made, it has a slim wooden polished cabinet with linear dial above the loudspeaker fret.

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A0721

Image of BEETHOVEN A415  WIRELESS, 1946

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BEETHOVEN A415 WIRELESS, 1946

In May 1946 Cost 16 Guineas Plus £3.12s.6d Purchase Tax

Donated by Mrs Edwards

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A0923

Image of CAR MASTERADIO, 1948

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CAR MASTERADIO, 1948

This early Car Radio would be slung under the parcel shelf with an external loudspeaker mounted either in a separate box or in the back parcel shelf. The power unit (missing) was bulky and noisy, so it was either under the bonnet or in the boot of the car.

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A0173

Image of VIDOR 'MY LADY MARGARET' BATTERY PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1954

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VIDOR 'MY LADY MARGARET' BATTERY PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1954

In June 1954 this cost £9-2s-10d PT Extra. Battery only version of Accession No1034.The 'My Lady Anne' portable.

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A1131

Image of PHILIPS 660 A/U WIRELESS, 1938

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PHILIPS 660 A/U WIRELESS, 1938

Supplied by Philips Lamp Co in August 1938 . Made by Mullard as Model MAS24.
The wooden cabinet in dark wood stain is in almost perfect condition, with square dial and revolving needle tuning, also push button selection of pre tuned stations, five valves Mains only.

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A1116

Image of CLIMAX FOLDING FRAME AERIAL, 1930's

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CLIMAX FOLDING FRAME AERIAL, 1930's

Frame Aerial used with early Wireless sets when a long Aerial in the garden was not possible.

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A1044

Image of EDISWAN 'COMPACTUM'  WIRELESS WL385, 1920's

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EDISWAN 'COMPACTUM' WIRELESS WL385, 1920's

Ediswan Compactum. Supplied in the 1920's as a kit costing £4 or complete and tested for £11- 11s. Required a HT and LT batteries with a good aerial and earth. Listening was by headphones. The receiver could be worked with any triode valve of the period, dull or bright emitter type.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1181

Image of MARCONIPHONE 256 WIRELESS, 1932

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MARCONIPHONE 256 WIRELESS, 1932

The Marconiphone 256 Superhet had six valves plus rectifier, designed to operate on 200-250 V, 50-100 Cycles. Release date 1932 costing £25.4s

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1155

Image of MULLARD MA3  WIRELESS, 1935

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MULLARD MA3 WIRELESS, 1935

The Mullard MA3 was manufactured in 1935. From the mid 20's till 1938 Mullard was more or less owned by Philips. A fact which was little known by the public, Philips models were labelled and sold as Mullard products, often with different cases. This model is in beautiful condition.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1163

Image of EVER READY SKY COUNTESS PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1958

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EVER READY SKY COUNTESS PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1958

The Ever Ready Sky Countess, is one of the last of the valve portables made by Ever Ready, in 1959 the 'Sky Captain' was made, which marked the switch to non-royal named transistors. The cost in 1958 was £10 which was quite expensive.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1175

Image of MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1920's

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MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1920's

Before permanent magnets were made strong enough and cheap enough, loudspeakers used a coil moving an iron reed which was attached to the diaphragm of the speaker.
Internally a high resistance coil with a permanent magnet through it was used to move an iron reed, attached to a rod on which was placed the paper cone. An Adjustment was provided for maximum efficiency. This method did not require a strong magnet to operate, and the quality was inferior to modern loudspeakers which use the moving coil principal.

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A1136

Image of 'SUNRISE' EXTENSION LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

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'SUNRISE' EXTENSION LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

Original moving iron speaker removed and replaced with moving coil type

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A0891

Image of CELESTION MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1927

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CELESTION MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1927

Before permanent magnets were made strong enough and cheap enough, loudspeakers used a coil moving an iron reed which was attached to the diaphragm of the speaker.
Internally a high resistance coil with a permanent magnet through it, was used to move an iron reed, this was attached to a rod on which was placed the paper cone. An Adjustment was provided for maximum efficiency. This method did not require a strong magnet to operate, and the quality was inferior to modern loudspeakers which use the moving coil principal.

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A0914

Image of 'THE THINKER'  MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

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'THE THINKER' MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

Extension Loudspeaker for transferring the wireless to other rooms, with fret cut out to the shape of 'The Thinker' sculpture.

On the the rear view can be seen the adjustment control for the Moving Iron Loudspeaker, it was necessary to occasional correct the clearance of the reed or armature, to keep the unit working properly if this was not done loud volumes would cause thumping or sticking, the unit needed to be able to give good sensitivity for all volume levels.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1168

Image of 'THE STAG' LOUDSPEAKER, 1950's

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'THE STAG' LOUDSPEAKER, 1950's

Extension Loudspeaker for transferring the wireless to other rooms, with fret cut out to the shape of a Stag.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1169

Image of RADIO MAGNAVOX MH1, 1920's

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RADIO MAGNAVOX MH1, 1920's

Designed to replace Headphones on early Wireless sets, before loudspeakers had been perfected because of problems with a strong enough magnet.
The coil is a high enough impedance to connect directly to the output valve of the set. The terminals on the units would carry high voltages, and yet no insulation was thought necessary.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1164

Image of STERLING 'BABY' LOUDSPEAKER HORN, 1923

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STERLING 'BABY' LOUDSPEAKER HORN, 1923

Designed to replace Headphones on early Wireless sets, before loudspeakers had been perfected because of problems with a strong enough magnet.
The coil is a high enough impedance to connect directly to the output valve of the set. The terminals on the units would carry high voltages, and yet no insulation was thought necessary.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1204

Image of RADIO LOUDSPEAKER HORNS, 1920's

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RADIO LOUDSPEAKER HORNS, 1920's

A selection of loudspeaker horns from the 1920's and a Bakelite Philips Loudspeaker from the 1930's.

Including
A BTH Tpe C2 1925
An Amplion 'Standard Dragon' AR19 1923
A Telephones Le Las Horn 1920's
A Philips Lamps Ltd Bakelite Loudspeaker surround Model 2007 1928
The horns would replace headphones on early valve receivers before loudspeakers had been perfected, or even manufactured, and were simply connected directly to the audio amplifier valve in the receiver. They were normally high resistance and therefore very sensitive. The connection from the audio amplifier valve would carry high voltages; (not liked by today's health and safety regulations!)

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A0167 to A0170

Image of REVOPHONE CRYSTAL SET AND HEADPHONES, 1923

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REVOPHONE CRYSTAL SET AND HEADPHONES, 1923

The Revophone Crystal Set 1923 Cost £2-10s Royalty was extra at 7s-6d. Its wooden box with hinged lid is in excellent condition, inside are two knobs and the crystal holder.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1188

Image of GECOPHONE JUNIOR CRYSTAL SET, 1925

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GECOPHONE JUNIOR CRYSTAL SET, 1925

This is the GECOPHONE Junior Crystal Set BC1700. Built by GEC (UK) in 1925, this simple crystal set is in a polished mahogany case. The connection points for the aerial, earth and headphones are all provided, the controls comprise a tuning knob and a lever to adjust the detector. This set would have cost 15s 0d in 1925,the 1600m Loading Coil would cost an extra 7s 6d.

At the back of the set is the 'Entirely British Manufacture' BBC stamp.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1233

Image of HMV 441A WIRELESS, 1935

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HMV 441A WIRELESS, 1935

Made by Marconiphone Ltd in 1935 as Model 264 for HMV, and sold as Model 441A with their Logo on the top. A large polished wooden cabinet with speaker fret on the front with bakelite frame and linear dial behind glass.

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A1138

Image of DICKSEN 'MIDGET' 4 VALVE WIRELESS DM40, 1939

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DICKSEN 'MIDGET' 4 VALVE WIRELESS DM40, 1939

Midget radios became popular in America between the wars as new smaller valves were being developed, this is just one example made in 1939 it has 4 valves including the mains rectifier, and a simple TRF circuit design.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1206

Image of MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY'S RADIO, V2 MODEL, 1922

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MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY'S RADIO, V2 MODEL, 1922

2 valve reflex circuit, manufactured between 1922 and 1926. Original cost £22.8s.0d reducing to £15.16s.2d in 1925, and to £8.0s.0d in 1926.

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A0771

Image of McMICHAEL MAINS THREE RADIO, 1931

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McMICHAEL MAINS THREE RADIO, 1931

The McMichael Mains Three of 1931 was a three valve TRF receiver that was built like a Tank, with a metal back and no expense spared on its construction. In 1931 it cost 20Gns. Valves and Royalty's included.

The Mains Three is what is known as a 'landmark set', i.e. it introduced a significant or interesting feature into radio design. In this case, it was the first radio to have a dial calibrated directly in wavelength (metres) - up until then dials/knobs were 0-100 with a look-up table.

Bruce Hammond Collection

Thanks to (www.McMichael.org.uk) David Cochrane.

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A1162

Image of McMICHAEL SUPER RANGE PORTABLE FOUR, 1932

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McMICHAEL SUPER RANGE PORTABLE FOUR, 1932

The McMichael Super Range Portable Four is similar but an earlier version of the Duplex Four Type S. which in its sales literature is described as:-.

A high efficiency four valve circuit is employed, double gang tuned to indicate on the duplex scale (not fitted on this model). An automatic grid bias dispenses with a grid bias battery (grid bias required with this model) and automatically adjusts the reproducing valves to maintain unimpared tonal quality throughout the life of the high tension battery. The set is contained in a handsome case of dark furniture hide, fitted with ebonite panels and controls, with with nickelled panel fittings. For protection an aluminium valve screen is employed.

Made between 1928 and 1931 it cost around 17 Gns.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1165

Image of McMICHAEL CONSOLE RADIO MODEL135, 1935

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McMICHAEL CONSOLE RADIO MODEL135, 1935

The firm of McMichael Radio, based in Slough, was established in the early 1920s by Leslie McMichael, in collaboration with design engineer Ben Hesketh. (Until the late 30s, sets carried the initials M-H, which stood for McMichael-Hesketh.)

Their sets were very solidly engineered, and made to a high standard. The company went to a lot of trouble promoting the radios. Publicity was helped by demonstrations of their sets' abilities to receive on trains and aeroplanes. These tests were probably less severe than the public imagined, but they were good publicity stunts.

Their sets were sold mainly by accredited dealers, who were urged on by an in-house magazine called the McMichael Messenger, which featured dealers from around the country.

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A0536

Image of RADIOLA BRITISH THOMPSON HOUSTON BIJOU, CRYSTAL SET  GPO Reg. No. 861, 1923

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RADIOLA BRITISH THOMPSON HOUSTON BIJOU, CRYSTAL SET GPO Reg. No. 861, 1923

Early Crystal receiver, Form B, Cost £1.15s.0d. Also shown is a boxed set of Brown's Type F headphones

Printed on the front of the set is the PO licence number.
All manufactures were legally bound to obtain a licence from the Post Master General, before producing their Wireless Sets.

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A0138, A0150

Image of WWII UTILITY RADIOS

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WWII UTILITY RADIOS

Utility radios were made by over 40 different manufacturers, under a government directive. They were very basic to keep the cost as low as possible, enabling everybody to be kept informed of events. Both Mains and battery versions are shown.
The battery version on the left was made by, Philips Lamps Ltd. and has a manufacturers mar of U8.
The mains version on the right was made by, Kolster Brandes. and has the manufacturers mark U32.

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A0163, A0162


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