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A Short History of the Gramophone

A Short History of the Gramophone

A Brief History of Wireless

A Brief History of Wireless


Image of GOBLIN TEAS MADE MODEL D25B, 1960's

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GOBLIN TEAS MADE MODEL D25B, 1960's

Machine for making tea automatically. On 17th December 1891 Samuel Rawbottom applied for a Patent for an electric tea making machine, this original device used a gas ring and alarm clock, on boiling, the water was forced through a tube into the kettle. The principal is still used today. The model above (D25B) originated from a patent application made by William H B Thornton in 1934 which switches the kettle off by a switch in the base released when the water falls below a certain level. The prototype formed the bases of the Goblin range of Teamaker D25 made in the 1950's from 1955 to 1960 it was replaced by the model D25B in 1960.

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A1556

Image of STAR TOASTER, 1922

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STAR TOASTER, 1922

Early Electric Toaster made by Maniby Fitzgerald in the USA.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1225

Image of KNAPP TOASTER, 1930's

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KNAPP TOASTER, 1930's

Early electric toaster in modern looking shape. Made by Knapp Monarch.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1223

Image of PREMIER CHROME TOASTER, 1930's

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PREMIER CHROME TOASTER, 1930's

Early Electric Toaster Made by Premier.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1224

Image of RYNA TOASTER TYPE 87, 1940's

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RYNA TOASTER TYPE 87, 1940's

Early toaster from the 1940's with toast positioned on flip down sides, marked 200v 400 Watts.

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A0784

Image of ELECTRIC SAUCEPAN, 1911

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ELECTRIC SAUCEPAN, 1911

Electric Copper Saucepan

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1220

Image of HOTPOINT COPPER KETTLE, 1930's

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HOTPOINT COPPER KETTLE, 1930's

Early kettle made of Copper, heated electrically.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1176

Image of 'SAMOVAR', 1930's

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'SAMOVAR', 1930's

Electric copper pot. Possibly a Samovar.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1219

Image of COPPER KETTLE, 1920's

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COPPER KETTLE, 1920's

A fine example of an early electric kettle made in the UK by Cimflex Conduits Ltd. Faster boiling was achieved by Swan in 1922, by placing the element in a metal tube, directly into the water chamber.

Most electric kettles of the 1920s and 1930s retained the traditional look of their non-electric ancestor, usually being made from copper with the option of nickel-plate or vitreous-enamel finish. Some lighter aluminium kettles were made in the 1930s and a few chrome-plated streamlined designs with Bakelite handles appeared in the late-1930s.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1221

Image of CHROME KETTLE, 1914

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CHROME KETTLE, 1914

The electric kettle was a uniquely British product, owing its existence and development to the British habit of tea-drinking. An electric kettle was first made by Crompton and Co. in 1891 and all the earliest examples had the element in a separate dry chamber under the water, maintaining the 'fire under the water' layout of traditional boiling vessels. The separation of water from the element made the kettle inefficient and expensive to run.

The electric kettle was, with a few exceptions, a strictly functional object and seldom seen outside the kitchen, being regarded as a supplementary appliance to the electric cooker.

This electric kettle was made by Launders Fray & Clark of USA.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1222

Image of HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1936

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HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1936

This is one of the very first examples of a "Teamaker", see item A0123 for further details.
The shade is of the period, but it is not the original.

This is one of the many items which have been donated to the museum, we are always very grateful to all our visitors who decide to place objects into our care.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1226

Image of HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1952

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HAWKINS 'TECAL' TEAMAKER, 1952

The first Teamaker was made by Goblin in 1936, many similar types were made after this, the one shown was made by Hawkins in 1952.

The Teamaker was a British invention of the 1930’s and was developed by the British Vacuum Cleaner company ('Goblin') and first marketed in 1936.

Within a couple of years, similar early morning tea machines appeared, although all versions operated in the same way: the alarm on the clock was set and when reached, an electric element in the kettle was switched on to heat the water. The pressure of the boiling water made it decant through a tube in the kettle lid into an adjacent tea or coffee pot, making the whole unit pivot forward and activating the light and buzzer alarm. Thus the sleeper awoke to a freshly brewed pot of tea!

The 'Teasmade' was a prime example of the 'servant replacement' function of many electrical appliances, as it took on the task of the early morning maid, her first responsibility being to supply a welcome cup of tea. Some very lavish versions were produced on large trays, with matching teapots and crockery sets. The 'Teasmade' was one of the few gadgets of the period to have survived, creating its own market and developing into a recognised household appliance.
See item A1226 for the 1936 version.

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A0123

Image of KENWOOD CHEF MIXER, 1950's

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KENWOOD CHEF MIXER, 1950's

Kenwood’s first main successful product was the Kenwood Electric Chef food processor. This soon became a must-have kitchen item and housewives all over the country wanted one.

The Kenwood Manufacturing Company Ltd. was taken over by Thorn EMI in 1968 after the 'Chef' had made Kenneth Wood a multi-millionaire.

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A0122

Image of DRIED MILK TIN, 1940's

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DRIED MILK TIN, 1940's

An example of a WWII Dried Milk Tin dated 1945.

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A0865


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