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A Brief History of Valves

A Brief History of Valves

A Brief History of the Transistor

A Brief History of the Transistor


Image of REFLEX KLYSTRON VA22A VALVE, 1950's

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REFLEX KLYSTRON VA22A VALVE, 1950's

Reflex Klystron VA22A used in Radar and communications.

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A0853

Image of WWII 708A WESTERN ELECTRIC VALVE

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WWII 708A WESTERN ELECTRIC VALVE

Western Electric 708A Radar Oscillating Triode of WW2.

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A0675

Image of CV 1098 VT 98 MOV 'CHAIN HOME LOW'  VALVE, 1936

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CV 1098 VT 98 MOV 'CHAIN HOME LOW' VALVE, 1936

Thoriated Filament version of the VT58 Pulsed Radar Triode of 1936.
The valves were used in the Chain Home Low transmitters during the beginning of WW2 of such importance in the Battle of Britain.
50 KWatts at 200Mhz using two valves in push pull, of pulsed power.
Developed from the ACT10, the air cooled version of the CAT15.

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A0649

Image of DET12 4304CB MOV VALVE, 1939

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DET12 4304CB MOV VALVE, 1939

The Marconi Osram Valve Company developed the DET12 in 1939 a Triode of up to 50 Watts for Microwave frequencies in pulsed Radar down to 1 metre, an unusual valve as both the grid and anode is taken out from the top wires.

It also found favour in early developments of VHF wireless transmitters for police use.
Sergeant Octaloni of the Manchester Police was a regular visitor to the MOV Factory on this project in the years before the Second World War.
The valve was used as the transmitter in the base station.

A pair of prototypes were used in the A1 Radar transmitter developed at Bawdsey Manor, and the T1131 Ground to Air Transmitter.

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A0663

Image of WWII CV64 RESONANT CAVITY MAGNETRON  VALVE

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WWII CV64 RESONANT CAVITY MAGNETRON VALVE

Almost identical to the 1st device made in the UK by GEC for use with Radar, on the 29th June 1940, this was copied by the U.S. during WW2 with permission from Winston Churchill.
The CV64 is a later version of the first Cavity Magnetron the E1189 or CV38.
The magnetron is electrically a diode and in use the flat sides of the central cavity are located between the poles of a powerful magnet (1,350 Gauss).
The magnetic field causes the electrons to spiral outward from the cathode to the anode. The cavities in the anode block produce the powerful microwave energy.

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A0670

Image of VT90 MICROPUP VALVE, 1939

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VT90 MICROPUP VALVE, 1939

The VT90 was the original 'Micropup' developed by the Marconi Osram Valve Company in 1939, operating 200 MHz and used in early airborne Radar. It was used in early Marks of AI and ASV radar.

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A0672

Image of COSSOR CATHODE RAY (OSCILLOGRAPH)  TUBE, 1937

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COSSOR CATHODE RAY (OSCILLOGRAPH) TUBE, 1937

Early electrostatic Oscilloscope (Oscillograph) tube with rounded face.
Known at this time as an Oscillograph tube, and used for the display of oscillating waveforms. The Type J screen gave a light blue response, and the Type H gave a sepia toned picture. Sizes of this range of tubes went up to 10 inches.

IN 1937 Radar had not been developed yet and TV was still in its infancy, EMI had not yet developed 405 line TV, and Baird was still in competition with EMI with his Televisor.

Type 3276 Dated 1937
The firm A.C.Cossor Ltd was established in 1859, making Scientific glassware.
Cossor Electronics started in 1875.

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A0188


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