Home:   Other Weapons

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Hiram Maxim and the Machine Gun

Hiram Maxim and the Machine Gun

Spin It - What makes a Rifle work?

Spin It - What makes a Rifle work?


Image of MASDEN LIGHT MACHINE GUN OF 1902 , 1950

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MASDEN LIGHT MACHINE GUN OF 1902 , 1950

The Madsen was a light machine gun developed by Julius A. Rasmussen and Theodor Schoubue and proposed for adoption by Captain Vilhelm Herman Oluf Madsen, the Danish Minister of War and adopted by the Danish Army in 1902. It was one of the first true light machine guns produced in quantity and sold to over 34 different countries worldwide, seeing extensive combat use in various conflicts around the globe for over 80 years The Madsen was produced by Compagnie Madsen A/S (later operating as Dansk Rekyl Riffel Syndikat A/S and then Dansk Industri Syndikat A/S). The Madsen continued to be used by the Military Police of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, with 7.62 calibre. Although some of the Brazilian guns were captured from drug traffickers and pressed into service (mostly old weapons originating from the Argentine Army as well as some stolen from museums, the majority of Madsens used by the Brazilian police were donated by the Brazilian Army. Those guns were .30 cal weapons converted to fit 7.62 mm calibre. Official sources state that the Brazilian army retired the Madsen machine gun in 1996. The Brazilian police guns are, from 2008, being substituted by more modern guns with faster rates of fire. It was reported that the last Madsen guns were finally retired in April 2008. However, photos taken during clashes between Brazilian police and drug traffickers on October 19, 2009 clearly show the Madsen gun still in use by the Brazilian police This one is marked with Portuguese Crest and RP.

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A1453

Image of WW1 BAYONET, 1907

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WW1 BAYONET, 1907

Standard British Bayonet for the SMLE rifle during WW1.

Known as the 1907 Pattern.

See Item A0994

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A0397

Image of FABRIQUE NATIONALE BAYONET  of 1924

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FABRIQUE NATIONALE BAYONET of 1924

Similar to 1907 British Bayonet, although with a metal scabbard, marked on pommel 3898. Made by the Fabrique Nationale factory in Belgium for the F.N.Mauser rifle supplied to Greece in 1924. The pommel has a Mauser pattern bar attachment groove, but unlike the German bayonets is also equipped with a muzzle ring. It has a highly polished blade instead of the normal Parkerised finish.

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A1482

Image of GERMAN  WW2 SHORT DRESS BAYONET KS98, 1939

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GERMAN WW2 SHORT DRESS BAYONET KS98, 1939

A 1939 pattern KS98 Short Dress Bayonet with a 10inch blade, not normally used on a rifle as these bayonets are for show only, in fact some do not have the catch to retain them on the gun.

The blade is Nickel Plated Silver and the scabbard is painted black. Marked Solingen E.U.F.Horster

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A0496

Image of WW1 CEREMONIAL OFFICERS SWORD AND SCABBARD

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WW1 CEREMONIAL OFFICERS SWORD AND SCABBARD

An officers ceremonial etched sword in it's scabbard from WW1.This item belongs with A0501.

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A0502

Image of WW1 LEWIS AUTOMATIC MACHINE RIFLE  (LEWIS GUN), 1916

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WW1 LEWIS AUTOMATIC MACHINE RIFLE (LEWIS GUN), 1916

Designed in 1911 by U.S. Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis, on initial work carried out by Samuel Maclean. The Americans did not adopt the rifle and Lewis had to go to the Belgium's for help, it was manufactured here before the 1st World War but as Belgium was invaded in 1914, production was moved to B.S.A. in England, having been already adopted by the British Army before the war.
It uses the standard British .303 round and fires 550rpm.
The weapon was eventually made by the Savage Arms Company USA in 1917, known as the M1917 being 0.300 inch calibre.
Although being lighter than the Vickers gun it still requires two men to handle it, one to carry the magazines and one the weapon. The weapon was withdrawn from service in 1946.

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A0385

Image of WW1 LEWIS LMG BREAKDOWN SHEET

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WW1 LEWIS LMG BREAKDOWN SHEET

Sheet used in workshops showing all the parts of a Mk1 Lewis Machine Gun from WW1.

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A0393

Image of WW1 WEBLEY MK6 REVOLVER AND SAM BROWNE BELT, 1917

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WW1 WEBLEY MK6 REVOLVER AND SAM BROWNE BELT, 1917

An Officers Webley Mk6 in it's original Sam Browne Belt from WW1. This item belongs with A0502.

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A0501

Image of WW1 K 98 MAUSER BAYONET SCABARD AND FROG

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WW1 K 98 MAUSER BAYONET SCABARD AND FROG

Bayonet for the KAR98 Carbine used by German infantry during WW1 See Item A0991

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A0452

Image of WWII THOMPSON MACHINE GUN M1928A, 1928

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WWII THOMPSON MACHINE GUN M1928A, 1928

The M1928A1 was the military version of the ''Tommy Gun'' also known as ''Chopper'' ''Chicago Typewriter'' and ''Chicago Piano''.
General John. T. Thompson designed the first model in 1916 and started with the help of a financier, formed the 'Auto Ordinance Company', where the phrase ''Sub Machine Gun'' was first used.
The first weapon he produced was called ''The Annihilator'', too late for the Fist World War, the gun was renamed the ''Thomson Machine Gun'' and subsequently went into production in 1921.
In the days of American ''Prohibition'' it became popular with gangsters and grew to fame in the Hollywood movies. In 1938 the pattern was adopted by the U.S. Army with the M1928A1 entering into production just before the attack on Pearl Harbour. It has a 50 round magazine, although this had a rattle and the 20 or 30 round magazine was preferred. Early models tended to rise on firing so the 'Cutts'' compensator was fitted to the barrel to compensate for this. It fires .45inch ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) rounds at a rate of fire of 800rpm.
The military version used the stick magazine and the forward pistol grip was changed for a barrel grip.

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A0383

Image of WWII STEN GUN MK 2, 1941

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WWII STEN GUN MK 2, 1941

Sten Mk2 Sub Machine Gun of 1941 (Major R.V.Shepherd & Harold John Turpin) & EN for Enfield form the name STEN.
Fired the 9mm Parabellum round at 500rpm. The gun was very cheap to produce but was disliked because of its ability to fire if dropped (when cocked), however it became used throughout the world during WW2 and after.
It was useful to resistance and terror organisations because it was light and could easily be dismantled and hidden.
It was finally withdrawn from service in the 1960's and replaced by the Sterling SMG. Shown with Bayonet.

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A0389

Image of WEBLEY JUNIOR PELLET PISTOL, 1930's

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WEBLEY JUNIOR PELLET PISTOL, 1930's

Webley and Scott made airguns from 1924 to 1999 this is the Webley Junior probably pre war by the serial No.
However it has metal grips and most guns were wood or plastic.

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A0750

Image of WWII WEBLEY FLARE PISTOL No 4 MK 1* SIGNAL PISTOL

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WWII WEBLEY FLARE PISTOL No 4 MK 1* SIGNAL PISTOL

Webley signal pistol designed to be mounted onto a bracket fixed to the walls of an aircraft or other surface ( mounting bracket missing ) the One & half inch round had to be inserted first, after firing, the gun was removed from the bracket and reloaded. The pistols fired coloured flares, Either when in distress or for identification purposes. An aircraft fired on would fire the "colours of the day" a combination of two or more colours,
changed daily - to prove that they were friendly. There is some evidence that RAF bomber crews were told the German colours of the day,
information presumably obtained via the code-breakers at Bletchley Park.

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A1124

Image of WWII BREN GUN MK1M

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WWII BREN GUN MK1M

In 1930 the British set out to replace the Lewis Gun, the result was based on a Czech design made by Brno the Zb26 resulting in the Bren, being the first letter of Brno and two letters from Enfield where the Royal Small Arms Factory was located.
The first gun was assembled in 1937 and Enfield maintained sole British production of the Bren. In 1940 Inglis of Canada began producing the gun as well, and by 1943 some 60% of Bren production was eventually carried out in Canada. Lithgow in Australia also built Bren Guns during the Second World War, it had a 30 round magazine, usually only holding 28 to save the spring, and fired 500 rounds per minute. Underneath the weapon is shown the Canvas Case Catcher Item No A1002. This weapon is fitted with a Mk2 barrel.

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A0379

Image of WWII BREN GUN CASE CATCHER, 1940's

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WWII BREN GUN CASE CATCHER, 1940's

Attaches to the bottom of a Bren gun to catch spent shell cases.
Used in an Anti-Aircraft role, (to prevent hot cases hitting the firer), or Armoured Fighting Vehicles (AFV's) See Item No A0379 The Bren Gun.

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A1002

Image of VICKERS HEAVY  MACHINE GUN AND TRIPOD, 1918

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VICKERS HEAVY MACHINE GUN AND TRIPOD, 1918

Vickers made the weapon under license from Maxim as it is basically the same. With some changes notably the Fuzzee cover and spring is upside down and the gun is also lighter. Firing up to 600 to 700 rounds per minute it was very reliable and remained in service after the second world war.
Originally Vickers charged the government 175 per weapon but after much criticism dropped the this to 80. The first design was made in 1912.
Originally called a Medium gun now referred to as heavy.

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A0337

Image of WWII MAUSER CLEANING KIT

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WWII MAUSER CLEANING KIT

Standard item for soldiers during WW2 for cleaning the Mauser Rifle Barrel. Brushes or a cloth could be pulled through to keep the barrel clean and lubricated, always under constant inspection by non commissioned officers.

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A0489

Image of STERLING L2A3 MACHINE GUN Mk4, 1950's

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STERLING L2A3 MACHINE GUN Mk4, 1950's

Designed by George Patchet in 1942 this was the last model of its type. firing 9 X 19 mm Parabellum rounds. Originally used by Airborne troops towards the end of the War,It replaced the earlier Sten gun.
In 1944 the British General Staff issued a specification which any new sub machine gun should conform to.
It stated that the weapon should not weigh more than six pounds, should fire 9x19mm Parabellum calibre ammunition, have a rate of fire of no more than 500 rounds per minute and be sufficiently accurate to allow five single shots to be fired into a one foot square target at 100 yards.
The Mk4 remained with the British Army from 1953 until 1988, when it was phased out with the introduction of the L85A1 assault rifle.

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A0955

Image of WWII VICKERS DIAL SIGHTS

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WWII VICKERS DIAL SIGHTS

Dial sight for the Vickers Heavy Machine Gun

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A0338

Image of POWDER MEASURE WITH BONE HANDLE, 1700's

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POWDER MEASURE WITH BONE HANDLE, 1700's

Device for measuring gun powder for muskets, the bottom of the container can be varied in depth and is calibrated 2.5 2.75 3 & 3.25 in inches.

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A0544

Image of MUSKET SHOT BOTTLE WITH MEASURE, 1700's

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MUSKET SHOT BOTTLE WITH MEASURE, 1700's

A measure for the correct amount of shot to load a weapon, achieved by a simple valve that when pressed blocked one end of a tube whilst opening the other releasing the stored shot between the two flaps.
The leather pouch is very well preserved.

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A0557

Image of FLINT LOCK PISTOL, 1800's

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FLINT LOCK PISTOL, 1800's

Land pattern Flintlock Pistol with no markings.
Guns like these were made by local blacksmiths to increase their trade.
The Land pattern style had a fixed Ramrod on a swivel attached to the barrel.

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A0542

Image of WWII BULOVER GUN SIGHT M70G, 1943

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WWII BULOVER GUN SIGHT M70G, 1943

Gun sight made during WW2 for unknown weapon.

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A0384

Image of WW1 VICKERS MACHINE GUN OIL BOTTLE

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WW1 VICKERS MACHINE GUN OIL BOTTLE

Part of the accessory kit for the Vickers Machine gun of WW1,
See Item A0337.

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A0817

Image of WW1 DWM P08 GERMAN LUGER, 1915

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WW1 DWM P08 GERMAN LUGER, 1915

Automatic hand gun first developed in 1908, manufactured by Deutsche Waffen-und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). Marked with the DWM monogram, and 'g' for Gewehr under the serial Number indicates it was made for a Rifle Company, it is also stamped with the Kiasers Mark.

The Parabellum-Pistole (Pistol Parabellum), popularly (but incorrectly)known as the Luger, is a toggle locked, recoil operated, semi-automatic pistol. The design was patented by George Luger in 1898 and produced by German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen-und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) starting in 1900; it was an evolution of the 1898 Hugo Borchardt designed C-93.

The Luger was made popular by its use by Germany during World War I and World War II. Though the Luger pistol was first introduced in 7.65x22mm Parabellum, it is notable for being the pistol for which the 9x19mm Parabellum cartridge was developed.

In World War I, as sub-machine guns were found to be effective in trench warfare, experiments with converting various types of pistols to machine pistols (Reihenfeuerpistolen, literally "row-fire pistols" or "consecutive fire pistols") were conducted. Among those the Luger pistol (German Army designation Pistole 08) was examined; however, unlike the Mauser C96, which was converted in great numbers to Reihenfeuerpistole, the Luger proved to have an excessive rate of fire in full-automatic mode.

The Luger pistol was manufactured to exacting standards and has a long service life. Bill Ruger praised the Luger's 55 degree grip angle and duplicated it in his .22 LR pistol.

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A0510

Image of BOX LOCK PERCUSSION PISTOL, 1800's

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BOX LOCK PERCUSSION PISTOL, 1800's

A very small box lock percussion pistol, probably used by a lady and was hidden in her muff when riding in a stage coach and used as protection.
Note:- Box lock means the hammer is internal to the body of the gun and not on the outside.

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A0504

Image of WWII MAUSER C96 WITH STOCK AND LEATHER HOLSTER

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WWII MAUSER C96 WITH STOCK AND LEATHER HOLSTER

The C96 is a semi-automatic pistol that was manufactured from 1896 to 1936 in Germany. It was one of the first semi-automatic pistols to see widespread use. It was also manufactured in direct or modified form in Spain and China in the first half of the 20th Century.

The main characteristics that distinguish the C96 are the integral box magazine in front of the trigger, the long barrel, the wooden shoulder stock which can double as a holster or carrying case, and a grip shaped like the end of a broom's handle (which earned it the nickname "Broom handle" in the English-speaking world). The Mauser C96 can be considered one of the first personal defence weapons (PDWs), as its long barrel and powerful cartridge gave it superior range and better penetration capabilities than most other standard pistols. There were many variants of the C96, notably the so-called "Bolo" version with a shorter barrel and smaller grips (which was manufactured after German handgun manufacturers were required to conform to Versailles restrictions on pistol barrel length). The Bolo earned that name due to the fact that the Bolshevik government of the Soviet Union in 1920s placed large orders for that model. There were versions with detachable magazines varying in size from 6 to 40 rounds (instead of the integral magazine seen on most pre-1930s versions), and models such as the M712 Schnellfeuer ("rapid fire") machine pistol from 1932 that was capable of fully automatic fire. All versions were made to use detachable shoulder stocks that doubled as holsters. A small number of carbine models with wooden stocks, wooden fore grips and much longer barrels were also manufactured.

During World War I the Imperial German Army contracted with Mauser for 150,000 C96 pistols chambered for the 9 mm Parabellum. This variant was named the "Red 9" after a large number "9" burned and painted in red into the grip panels, to prevent the pistols' users from loading them with 7.63 mm ammunition by mistake. Of the 150,000 pistols commissioned, approximately 135,000 were delivered before the war ended. This was the only time in which the C96 was ever used officially by the German army. The Mauser C96 was sold commercially worldwide; Winston Churchill favoured it, and used one at the Battle of Omdurman and during the Second Boer War. The pistols saw service in various colonial wars, World War I, the Spanish Civil War, the Chaco War, and World War II, among other places.

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A0777

Image of WWII GERMAN MP 40 MACHINE GUN, 1942

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WWII GERMAN MP 40 MACHINE GUN, 1942

The MP40 is descended from its predecessor, the MP38. The MP36, a prototype made of machined steel, was developed independently by Erma's Berthold Geipel with funding from the German army. It took design elements from Heinrich Vollmer's VPM 1930 and EMP.
Vollmer then worked on Berthold Geipel's MP36 and in 1938 submitted a prototype to answer a request from the German Armament services for a new sub machine gun, which was adopted as MP38. The MP38 was a simplification of the MP36, as the MP40 was a further simplification of the MP38, with certain cost-saving alterations, notably in the use of more pressed rather than machined parts.

Other changes resulted from experiences with the several thousand MP38s in service since 1939, used during the invasion of Poland. The changes were incorporated into an intermediate version, the MP38/40, and then used in the initial MP40 production version. Just over 1 million would be made of all versions in the course of the war.

The MP40 was often called the "Schmeisser" by the Allies, after weapons designer Hugo Schmeisser. Hugo Schmeisser himself did not design the MP40 but held a patent on the magazine. He designed the MP41, which was a MP40 with a wooden rifle stock and a selector, identical to those found on the earlier MP28 sub machine gun. The MP41 was not introduced as a service weapon with the German Army, but saw limited use with some SS and police units. They were also exported to Germany's ally, Romania. The MP41's production run was brief, as Erma filed a successful patent infringement lawsuit against Schmeisser's employer, Haenel.
This made at Steyr-Daimler-Puch AG, Steyr, Austria

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A0874

Image of LADIES PIN FIRE REVOLVER, circa 1850

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LADIES PIN FIRE REVOLVER, circa 1850

A very small hand pistol with a lock for firing Pin Fire Cartridges.

This gun is so small that ladies in the 1800's would be able to conceal it in their hand muffs. Pin fire Cartridges have a small pin protruding outward from the circumference of the blunt end, when the hammer of the weapon is released it forces the pin inwards, this creates the spark necessary to fire the charge. Calibre 7mm.

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A0505

Image of WWII MG 34 LIGHT MACHINE GUN GERMAN, 1938

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WWII MG 34 LIGHT MACHINE GUN GERMAN, 1938

MG-34 was designed in the early 1930s by the team lead by Louis Stange at Rheinmetall, leading German arms manufacturer at that time. Final design, adopted for service in 1934, incorporated numerous features from experimental prototypes built by Rheinmetall, Mauser-werke, and others. As was requested by German army, it was a truly universal machine gun, capable of different roles. It was put into production circa 1935, and remained an official MG of the Wehrmacht until 1942, when it was officially replaced my more reliable and cheap MG-42. But, despite this, MG-34 continued to serve until the end of WW2, mostly as a tank gun, because it was better suited for this role than the MG-42.
In general, MG-34 was an outstanding weapon, with very fine finish and made to tight tolerances, but this become also its biggest drawback - being too expensive and too slow to manufacture, MG-34 was less than suitable for mass wartime production. It also was somewhat sensitive to dirt and fouling, a standard attribute of the western front battles. But the most major advantage of the MG-34 was its versatility, and it set the trend for numerous latter designs.
This one made at Otto Goessel u. Co., Glashuette in Sachsen. South of Dresden.

References WWW.ModernFirearms.net

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A0406

Image of MAXIM HEAVY MACHINE GUN OF 1910 ON WWII SOKOLOV MOUNT, 1944

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MAXIM HEAVY MACHINE GUN OF 1910 ON WWII SOKOLOV MOUNT, 1944

Used by the Russian Army during WW1 and also the Red Army during WW2, it was imported to many countries including China, in Russian the Pulemyot Maxima na stanke Sokolova or the Pulemyot Maxima PM1910 'Maxim Machine Gun' was adopted in 1910, and was replaced by the Gorunov SG-43 in 1943, although manufacturing did not cease until the end of the second world war.
This one is dated 1944 it has a calibre of 7.62X54mm and can fire 600 rpm, the design was based on Maxims original.On the top of the barrel cooling jacket is an opening for inserting snow or water for cooling.

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A0346

Image of WWII MG 34 'LAFETTE' GUN MOUNT, 1945

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WWII MG 34 'LAFETTE' GUN MOUNT, 1945

For the MG34 Machine Gun
See Item A0496

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A0988

Image of WWII RUSSIAN PPSH 41 MACHINE GUN, 1942

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WWII RUSSIAN PPSH 41 MACHINE GUN, 1942

Dated 1943 first adopted in 1942 designed by Georgii Shapagin. in Russia, many were sold to Germany whilst they were still allies, then used against them later.Calibre 7.62mm. with round magazine.
The impetus for the development of the PPSH came partly from the Winter War against Finland, where it was found that sub machine guns were a highly effective tool for close-quarter fighting in forests or built-up urban areas. The weapon was developed in mid-1941 and was produced in a network of factories in Moscow, with high-level local Party members made directly responsible for production targets being met.

A few hundred weapons were produced in November 1941 and another 155,000 were produced over the next five months. By spring 1942, the PPSH factories were producing roughly 3,000 units a day. The PPSH-41 was a classic example of a design adapted for mass production (other examples of such wartime design were the M3 Grease Gun, MP40 and the Sten). Its parts (excluding the barrel) could be produced by a relatively unskilled workforce with simple equipment available in an auto repair garage or tin shop, freeing up more skilled workers to other tasks. The PPSH-41 used 87 components compared to 95 for the PPD-40 and the PPSH could be manufactured with 7.3 machining hours compared with 13.7 hours for the PPD.

On the field, the PPSH was a durable, low-maintenance weapon that could fire 900 rpm. The weapon had a crude compensator to lessen muzzle climb and a hinged receiver which facilitated field-stripping and cleaning the bore in battle conditions.

Over 6 million of these weapons were produced by the end of the war. The Soviets would often equip whole regiments and even entire divisions with the weapon, giving them unmatched short-range fire power. Though 35-round curved box magazines were available from 1942, the average infantryman would keep a higher-capacity drum magazine as the initial load.The PPSH-41 drum magazine was a copy of the Finnish M31 Suomi magazine which held 71 rounds but in practice misfeeding of the spring was likely to occur with more than 65 or so. The standard load was probably one drum and a number of box magazines, when box magazines were available.

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A0986

Image of WWII STERLING LANCHESTER MK1*

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WWII STERLING LANCHESTER MK1*

This weapon was a copy of the German MP28. The British version was made by George Lanchester of the Sterling Armaments Company. Intended for the Royal Air force and Navy, most went to the latter. Firing 9mm ammunition, it saw little service after the War.
In 1940, with the Dunkirk evacuation completed, the Royal Air Force decided to adopt some form of sub machine gun for airfield defence. With no time to spare for the development of a new weapon it was decided to adopt a direct copy of the German MP28, captured examples of which were at hand for examination. The period was so desperate that the British Admiralty decided to join with the RAF in adopting the new weapon, and played a key role in its design. By a series of convoluted events, the Admiralty alone actually adopted the Lanchester into service.

The British MP28 copy was given the general designation of Lanchester after George Lanchester who was charged with producing the weapon at the Sterling Armament Company, the same company that went on to produce the Sterling sub machine gun that is presently the standard sub machine gun of many nations.

The Lanchester was envisioned as a weapon that could be used for guarding prisoners and accompanying naval landing and assault parties. It was a very solid, extremely heavy sub machine gun, in many ways the complete opposite of its direct contemporary, the Sten.
The Lanchester had a heavy wooden butt and stock, a machined steel action and breech block, and a magazine housing made from a favourite naval construction material, solid brass. A few details typical for the era were added, such as a mounting on the muzzle for use of a long bladed British bayonet. The rifling differed from the German original in details to accommodate various lots of 9 mm ammunition then being acquired for service use. The Lanchester also used furniture from the Lee-Enfield SMLE.

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A0931

Image of WWII MG 42 GERMAN  LIGHT MACHINE GUN, 1942

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WWII MG 42 GERMAN LIGHT MACHINE GUN, 1942

The MG 42 (shortened from German: Maschinengewehr 42, or "machine gun 42") is a 7.92mm universal machine gun that was developed in Nazi Germany and entered service with the Wehrmacht in 1942.
It supplanted and in some instances, replaced the MG 34 general purpose machine gun in all branches of the German Armed Forces, though both weapons were manufactured and used until the end of the war.
This one possibly made at Zeitzer Eisengiesserei u. Maschinenbau-Aktien-Ges., Zeitz.


The MG 42 has a proven record of reliability, durability, simplicity, and ease of operation, but is most notable for being able to produce a stunning volume of suppressive fire. The MG 42 has one of the highest average rates of fire of any single-barrelled man-portable machine gun, between 1,200 and 1,500 rpm, resulting in a distinctive muzzle report.
There were other automatic weapon designs with similar fire power, such as the Hungarian-Gebauer single-barrelled tank MGs, the Russian 7.62mm GShak aircraft gun and the British Vickers K machine gun.
However, the MG 42's belt-feed and quick-change barrel system allowed for more prolonged firing in comparison to these weapons.

The MG 42's lineage continued past Nazi Germany's defeat, forming the basis for the nearly identical MG1 (MG 42/59), and subsequently evolved into the MG1A3, which was in turn followed by the MG 3. It also spawned the Swiss MG 51, SIG MG 710-3, Austrian MG 74, and the Spanish 5.56mm Ameli light machine gun, and lent many design elements to the American M60 and Belgian MAG. The MG 3 served with many armies during the Cold War and remains in use to this day.

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A1289

Image of WWII CRUCIFORM SPIKE BAYONET No 4 MK 1

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WWII CRUCIFORM SPIKE BAYONET No 4 MK 1

The original spike bayonet for the No 4 rifle, the cruciform shape was banned by the Geneva Convention and the Mk2 was introduced in 1940 with a plain round spike. Made by Singer Manufacturing 'SM'. Complete with Scabbard.
Only 7500 units were made. Adopted 1939

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A0553

Image of No4 Mk2 SPIKE BAYONET, 1940's

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No4 Mk2 SPIKE BAYONET, 1940's

The No4 Mk2 spike bayonet replaced the No4 Mk1 Cruciform type (see Item A0553) in 1940, being of simpler construction and cheaper to produce. Like its predecessor it fitted the No4 series of rifle.

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A1480

Image of No4 Mk2 BAYONET DESERT , 1940's

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No4 Mk2 BAYONET DESERT , 1940's

No4 Mk2 Spike Bayonet in cylindrical scabbard with square end and painted in desert colours. Marked N 67 for Singer Manufacturing Co.

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A1481

Image of ENFIELD No9 Mk1 BAYONET & SCABBARD, 1960

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ENFIELD No9 Mk1 BAYONET & SCABBARD, 1960

Bayonet No9 Mk1 for the Lee Enfield No4 rifle. Made in Pakistan in 1960, towards the end of manufacture for this weapon. Production started 1947 before it was approved and ended in 1966. Indian production at the Pakistan Ordinance factory 1953 to 1966

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A1525

Image of No 9 ENFIELD BAYONET (KNIFE), 1960's

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No 9 ENFIELD BAYONET (KNIFE), 1960's

The No9 Bayonet. Towards the end of the World War 2, Adopted 1948, the British Authorities decided to develop a knife bayonet. The blade on this weapon is not fluted as normal because it is made in South Africa after 1960 for a subsidiary of Armscor. It has a 6.5 inch blade not the normal 8inch. Similar to the Israel blade for the UZI MG. The Scabbard is apparently not for this weapon, see comment.

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A0552

Image of WWI  BAYONET WITH QUILLON FOR THE LEE ENFIELD MK 3, 1907

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WWI BAYONET WITH QUILLON FOR THE LEE ENFIELD MK 3, 1907

Reproduction of the original 1907 bayonet, in 1913 all the Quillon's (hooked piece above the blade) were removed.
Made by Lithgow Small arms factory in Australia in 1919.
The Lee Enfield Mk3 rifle uses this Bayonet.
Marked ER under a crown 7'19

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A0554

Image of WWII RUSSIAN DEGTYREV PAKHOTNY LIGHT MACHINE GUN, 1926

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WWII RUSSIAN DEGTYREV PAKHOTNY LIGHT MACHINE GUN, 1926

Made in limited production in 1926 adopted by the Russian army 2 years later.
Uses a 50 round magazine 7.62 calibre Dated 1945

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A1123

Image of WW1 MG 08/15 MASCHINEN GEWEHR

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WW1 MG 08/15 MASCHINEN GEWEHR

The MG 08/15 is a lighter version of the MG 08 made probably as a result of the British using the Lewis Gun (the Germans had no light machine gun at the outbreak of WW1). It is identical in operation to the MG 08 and still has water cooling, unlike the Lewis, the French Chauchat and the Hotchkiss which were air cooled.

Adopted in 1915, 300,000 were produced during the war at the Spandau Arsenal, very few of the original units remain.

This example was found in a dugout in Belgium and has been restored. Dated 1917 it almost certainly saw active service during WW1. Also shown is an original drum magazine, a more common form of feeding the gun was via a 50 round belt.

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A1278

Image of WW1 MG 08 MASCHINEN GEWEHR

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WW1 MG 08 MASCHINEN GEWEHR

The MG 08 was the standard heavy machine gun used by the German Army during the First World War, the 08 refers to its year of adoption and was a further development of the MG 01. It was similar to Hiram S Maxims 1884 model, and
remained in use until 1942, being replaced by the MG 34 (1934).

The sled mount was the more common form of mounting during WW1, other countries who adopted the weapon used tripods and wheeled mountings.

A water jacket was used to cool the barrel during its operation, steam from this chamber is fed into a receptacle and recycled by pouring the condensed water back into the jacket. The method of operation is by the recoil created by the fired bullets.

Before and during the war these guns were produced at the Government Arsenal at Spandau.
This example was captured in the Middle East by the South Staffordshire Regiment during WW1 and was given to the museum in 2005 by the South Staffordshire Regimental Museum, and has Turkish markings on the cover.

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A0875

Image of WWII PIAT ANTI-TANK WEAPON (Projector Infantry Anti-tank)

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WWII PIAT ANTI-TANK WEAPON (Projector Infantry Anti-tank)

Effective Range 109 yds (98 mtrs). Metal Piercing Power 3.9 inch (100 mm).

When a projectile was fired a small charge fitted in the hollow tube within the bomb ignited; this re-cocked the weapon ready for the next bomb. Not only was the projectile unreliable in its effect but often the unit did not re-engage ready for the next bomb.

Consequently this weapon was not popular with the troops who used it. When it failed it was difficult to re-load as the operator had to stand on the shoulder piece and pull to compress a large spring until the trigger engaged.

Adopted by the British in 1943 and taken out of service in 1950. This unit is probably post war as it has not seen active service and is in new condition.

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A0827


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