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GRAMDECK CONVERSION FROM RECORD DECK TO TAPE RECORDER, 1950's

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GRAMDECK CONVERSION FROM RECORD DECK TO TAPE RECORDER, 1950's

This was placed on the turntable of a standard record player with a 78rpm, a small peg was mounted on the gramophone deck which located into the gramdec base to hold it steady. The cable attached was connected to the pre-amplifier supplied, and this was in turn connected to an audio power amplifier. A microphone was supplied which could be used via the pre-amplifier for recording. Cost 39 gns, RRP when first introduced.

Your comments:

  • I have the original flyer, order form, info and return envelope you sent away for via the newspaper also the original "cutting" dated 14/4/59 ......cost 13-12-0 (or easy terms) ...Mike
    .......... mike penny, bristol, 15th of February 2015

  • 2 items of information:
    (A) There are 2 models of deck with different capstans.
    The 'mark 1' has a built-up capstan. It did not record at any of the standard tape speeds. The mark 2 has a solid dural capstan that is slightly smaller in diameter than the mark 1. The mark 2 runs at the standard speed of 7.5ips at 78 rpm.
    (B) The electronics were designed (and built?) by W.H.Sanders (Electronics) Ltd of Stevenage Herts. There are at least 2 marks of circuit. Note the drawing numbers and their titles appear to be out-of-sequence. From their blueprints:
    (i) Drawing B.3555/C is "CIRCUIT DIAGRAM MKII GRAM DECK PRE-AMPLIFIER". In the Modifications box it dates Issue 1 as 6.1.59 and Issue 2/Mod 1 as 30.4.59. The cct diagram also states "UK Patent Applied for - UK19526", Drawn ITG Mardlin, Traced <unsigned>, Checked RxBryant, Approved xVG Lusher (x=indecipherable). It does not identify the transistor types. My copy is date stamped 27 JUN 1963.
    (ii) Drawing B.4100/045 is "CIRCUIT DIAGRAM GRAM DECK PRE-AMPLIFIER MK.I A.M.". In the Modifications box it dates Issue 1 as 27.1.60 and has no subsequent MODs. The cct diagram states "Circuit Patent Applied for UK19526", Drawn DGxxxx, Traced M.O'B <sic>, Checked <unsigned>, Approved <unsigned> (x=indecipherable). It identifies the transistor types: Tr1 = XB102, Tr2 = XB102, Tr3 = OC320/330. My copy is date stamped 30 APR 1963.

    .......... john holmes, bishops waltham, 27th of December 2011

  • I had a Gramdeck on trial in 1962 and I'm pretty sure the price was circa 14.

    On "pop" music it worked well but but on classical, with its inevitable quiet passages, the hiss on playback due to the permanent magnet erasure was too obtrusive so I returned the unit.

    It really was fun though and it did introduce me to - and develop an interest in - tape recording which I still do on a Philips reel-to-reel and three cassette recorders by Memorex, Denon and Technics.

    I HAVE heard of Compact Disc!

    I found the Lustraphone microphone to be very "plummy" sounding with not very good fidelity which didn't matter as I recorded direct from the radio.
    .......... Bertie, Carmarthenshire, UK., 11th of August 2011

  • Ran at standard 7.5ips if turntable was at 78rpm,no other standard tape speed was available,I see 39Guineas mentioned,never that dear sold for well under 20
    .......... Bob Balser, Great Wakering Essex UK, 15th of July 2010

  • I remember seeing these advertised in the Radio Times. It seemed like a great idea and I tried to persuade my Dad to get one, but 39 guineas was serious money in the early 60's. He later did actually get a proper tape recorder ( a Marconi model) and I still have it. It just about works. That was how I got into electronics engineering.

    If I remember correctly, these kits were sold by the firm of ANDREW MERRYFIELD, who also sold kits of parts to make furniture (Furni-Kit). My Dad actually bought one of those, and made a nice book-case.
    .......... Colin Carroll, Langford, Bedfordshire., 31st of October 2009

  • A tape DECK you can add to a GRAMophone. I can remember them being advertised and think they ran at a standard tape speed of 3.75 inches/second provided you used the right speed setting on the Gramophone - you could get other tape speeds but they would not then be standard.
    .......... John Bishop, Bath UK, 1st of September 2009

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