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Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.

Image of WW1 MEDALS KNOWN AS 'PIP SQUEAK & WILFRED'

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WW1 MEDALS KNOWN AS 'PIP SQUEAK & WILFRED'

The first medal (The Star) was only issued if the named person was in active service during 1914 to 1915, these men would have been volunteers and already in service, there was no conscription at the time.

The other two were issued automatically at the end of the war, and were all marked with the owners name, (unlike the second war).

Recipients could claim their medals which were issued on request, if the person was deceased then the family could claim.

These were issued to Private W. Sanger RAMC

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A0356

Image of WW1 ON WAR SERVICE, 1914

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WW1 ON WAR SERVICE, 1914

During 1914 men would rather enlist than suffer unemployment. To help with the loss of labour (Skill and experience ) it was suggested by some firms and approved by Churchill to issue a badge, in recognition of their service.

A badge was issued for Admiralty Service but was vetoed by the Treasury. The problem of supplying the troops with Arms and equipment continued and eventually badges were issued saving these men from 'White feather treatment' and loss of face.

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A0903

Image of WW1 ON WAR SERVICE BADGE, 1915

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WW1 ON WAR SERVICE BADGE, 1915

This badge was issued by the company named on the badge.

J R Gaunt & Son Ltd in 1915

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A0848

Image of WW1 ON WAR SERVICE  BADGE, 1916

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WW1 ON WAR SERVICE BADGE, 1916

During 1914 men would rather enlist than suffer unemployment.

To help with the loss of labour, because of men enlisting, it was suggested by some firms, and approved by Churchill, to issue a badge in recognition of their service, hence the On War Service Badge.

A badge was issued for Admiralty Service but was vetoed by the Treasury.

The problem of supplying the troops with Arms and Equipment continued and eventually badges were issued to all who were doing war work, saving these men from 'White feather treatment' and loss of face.

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A0944

Image of WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 2nd CLASS, 1914

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WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 2nd CLASS, 1914

The Second Class Iron Cross, they were hung on a ribbon.

The first class medal was made for a button hole or pin fixing.

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A0974

Image of WW1 GERMAN MEDALS

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WW1 GERMAN MEDALS

German Medals from the Great War, including an Iron Cross 2nd class of 1823, a photo of the owner and record book dated 1915.

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A0989

Image of WW1 DEATH PLAQUE TO WILLIAM CHARLES DIMENT

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WW1 DEATH PLAQUE TO WILLIAM CHARLES DIMENT

The Citation reads.

"In memory of William Charles Diment. Lance Corporal 18947, 6th Bn., Dorsetshire Regiment who died on Saturday 8th Age 19. Son of Arthur L and M Diment of Staple Cross Burton Christchurch Hants."
Poziers Memorial, Somme, France. The memorial relates to the period of crisis in March & April 1918 when the Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and to the succeeding period of four months during which there was built up, behind the new front of the army, which on the 8th August 1918 began the advance to victory.
The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the UK and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave & who fell in France during the 5th Army area retreat on the Somme from 21st March to 7th August 1918.
The Corps & Regiments most largely represented are the Rifle Brigade with over 600 names, The Machine Gun Corps with over 500, The Manchester Regiment with approximately 500 & The Royal Horse & Royal Field Artillery with over 400 names.

The Museum is extremely grateful to Julie Dunne, she has allowed us to use the article she wrote for the Military Times Magazine, it makes very interesting reading.

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A0354

Image of WW1 LUSITANIA REPLICA MEDALS, 1915

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WW1 LUSITANIA REPLICA MEDALS, 1915

The facsimile of the newspaper reads:

"A German Naval Victory, with joyful pride we contemplate this latest deed of our Navy. Kolnische Volkszeitung, 10th May 1915. This Medal has been struck in Germany with the object of keeping alive in German hearts the recollection of the glorious achievement of the German Navy in deliberately destroying an unarmed passenger ship, together with 1,198 non combatants, men women and children".

On the obverse, under the legend ''No contraband'' (Keine Bannware), there is a representation of the Lusitania sinking. The designer has put in guns and aeroplanes, which (as certified by the United States Government officials after inspection) the Lusitania did not carry; but has conveniently omitted to put in the women and children, which the world knows she did carry.

On the reverse, under the legend ''Business above all'' (Geschaft uber alles), the figure of Death sits at the booking office of the Cunard Line and gives out tickets to passengers, who refuse to attend to the warning against submarines given by the Germans.
This picture seeks apparently to propound the theory that if a murderer warns his victim of his intention, the guilt of the crime will rest with the victim, not the murderer.
The designer of the medals was originally a German called Karl Gotz. The Kaiser himself condemned the sinking and ordered that no more unresisting merchant ships and passenger liners were to be sunk without prior warning.

Later Germany was embarrassed by reports in the foreign press of a German medal celebrating the sinking (above) . It was revealed that the Munich metal worker had cast about 100 medals. Gotz explained that he was a satirist and the medals were purely allegorical, and was not celebrating the sinking but condemning the Cynicism of Cunard in enticing innocent people on board an armed ship carrying contraband. (The date on the medal is 5th May which Gotz admitted was a mistake he later corrected)the distribution of the medal was halted but all to late, the propaganda weapon had already been fired.

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A0355

Image of CATERPILLAR BADGE, 1930's

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CATERPILLAR BADGE, 1930's

Reproduction of the Caterpillar Badge created by the inventor of the parachute, Leslie Irvin, who started a club to commemorate all airman who have been saved by his invention.

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A0298

Image of WWII BURMA STAR

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WWII BURMA STAR

WW11 Medal awarded to personal who served in Burma during WW11

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A1106

Image of WWII ARP BADGE

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WWII ARP BADGE

Badge for Air Raid Wardens, used during WW2

Donated by Owen Jones

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A1028


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