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The telephone, who really invented it?

The telephone, who really invented it?


Image of RELIANCE EXPORT DRY CELL (battery), 1930's

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RELIANCE EXPORT DRY CELL (battery), 1930's

Originally designed for local battery telephones, and were installed inside the phone itself. See item A0007.

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A0271

Image of BELL'S GALLOWS PHONE  (Replica), 1875

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BELL'S GALLOWS PHONE (Replica), 1875

Bell's Gallows Phone spurred Bell and Watson to produce their first Telephone Patent on March 7th 1876. They beat Elisha Grey by only a few hours. This has been contested by Grey, who was working on their liquid transmitter. Bell's device was a version of his multiple telegraph, from which this design is based.

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A0008

Image of BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONE, 1900's

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BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONE, 1900's

So called because it is shaped like a butter stamp.
This early telephone instrument was used for transmitting and receiving.

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A1017

Image of PO TELEPHONE No. 59, 1900's

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PO TELEPHONE No. 59, 1900's

Used by the General Post Office as No 59, the box, made of Walnut contained 2 Dry Cells or Leclanche cells, as this phone was powered locally (LB local battery). Designed by Ericsson in 1899 and taken over by the National Telephone Company, formed in 1885 from both the Bell & Edison Companies at the time. Similar to the Sterling U373 which has the handset at the side.

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A0007

Image of FIELD TELEPHONE, 1900's

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FIELD TELEPHONE, 1900's

Origin and make unknown, believed to have been made in the late 19th century , as it uses a Deckert type Transmitter of that period.

This item is also shown on our mysteries page.

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A0002

Image of SPOON RECEIVER OR EARPIECE, 1900's

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SPOON RECEIVER OR EARPIECE, 1900's

Part of a telephone unit , listening was carried out on this unit, it was not used for speaking into, a Transmitter was provided for this.
The rest of the instrument is missing.

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A0032

Image of STERLING No 2  (CANDLESTICK) PHONE, 1906

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STERLING No 2 (CANDLESTICK) PHONE, 1906

The Candlestick, used with bell set No 1, replaced earlier golf ball style candlesticks, introduced in 1901. It was made by Western Electric and was first used by the National Telephone Company, taken over by the Post Office also as a No 2. The unit shown was manufactured by Sterling Telephone and Electric Company Ltd. Described as a central battery table telephone (pillar phone) having a solid black granular transmitter, with adjustable joint and enamelled brass base. No internal circuitry was provided other than the receiver hook switch, this was all provided in the bell box, which is connected to this instrument, (not shown).

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A0003

Image of L.M.ERICSSON GPO TELEPHONE No.16, circa 1909

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L.M.ERICSSON GPO TELEPHONE No.16, circa 1909

This instrument was designated the No.16 by the British Post Office and was in use until the 1950's. It is based on an earlier design introduced in 1895 which looked almost identical and was supplied to the National Telephone Company.

The example shown was made for the GPO by L.M.Ericsson and is is marked No.16. The transfers are almost certainly not original.

Also known as a 'Skeleton Phone' or 'Eiffel Tower' in America.

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A0001

Image of BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONES, 1920's

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BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONES, 1920's

Talking and listening was achieved by using these instruments.

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A0885

Image of GPO MODEL 150  CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE, 1920's

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GPO MODEL 150 CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE, 1920's

Candlestick telephone, introduced in 1906, it was used with a bell set No 1a see item A0746.
When the automatic exchanges came in, this design replaced the Telephone No 2, as dials were introduced.

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A0009

Image of INTERNAL TELEPHONE, 1920's

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INTERNAL TELEPHONE, 1920's

A small wooden telephone used in offices or coal mines for one to one communication. Two units and a small battery is all that is required to work these units. Working with this instrument in coal mines could be a problem if there was gas around, never the less such units were seen in mines in the early days of Telephones. Strict rules would apply to their use but communication was as important as safety and the position of the instrument was carefully considered.

Known as a 'Direct Line Wall Telephone Set'

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A0010

Image of TMC PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

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TMC PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

Replacement for earlier skeleton phone .
See item A0001.

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A0033

Image of JYDSK PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

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JYDSK PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

This model replaced the earlier skeleton style (See Item A0001) and was probably manufactured by Telefonfeabrikker of Horsons. For Jydsk (Jutland). Telefon Aktieselskab marked on the front.

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A0031

Image of GPO 121F WALL TELEPHONE, 1924

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GPO 121F WALL TELEPHONE, 1924

Made from around 1924. Wall version of GPO model 150 Telephone.
Made originally from the Bell set No1 Item A1089.

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A0011

Image of WALLIGRAPH  CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE HOLDER, 1930's

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WALLIGRAPH CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE HOLDER, 1930's

Wall mounted telephone holder for Candlestick telephones.

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A0084

Image of HUSH-A-PHONE ADAPTOR, 1940

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HUSH-A-PHONE ADAPTOR, 1940

Hush-A-Phone Corporation marketed a small, cup-like device, from as early as 1921, by Tom Carter, which mounted on the speaking party's phone, reducing the risk of conversations being overheard and increasing sound fidelity for the listening party. A,T&T took the company to court, objecting to other manufacturers making attachments to there phones in 1956. Hush A Phone won the case. Reviewed in Popular Mechanics February 1941. Two versions were available one for the candlestick phone (this one) and one for the new 'Neophone' single piece handset.

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A1441

Image of ENAMALLED TELEPHONE SIGN, 1950's

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ENAMALLED TELEPHONE SIGN, 1950's

Signs like these used to be common place outside anywhere that could sell the facility described, most common were Post Offices.

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A1380

Image of GERMAN TELEPHONE EXCHANGE SIEMENS

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GERMAN TELEPHONE EXCHANGE SIEMENS

Believed to have been made by Siemens in Germany during WW2 but there is no military markings on the unit. Switching is achieved by loose cords and plugs, with flaps on the front to indicate that a phone has been lifted, buttons on the front can select one circuit at a time presumably for the operators headset. Dated 1940

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A1446

Image of ADVANCE PRIVATE AUTOMATIC  EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD)  MASTER STATION, 1970's

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ADVANCE PRIVATE AUTOMATIC EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD) MASTER STATION, 1970's

Transistorised unit with speech amplifier for office communications.
The dial mounted on the front is for internal dialling.

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A0047

Image of PO WALL CLOCK, 1970's

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PO WALL CLOCK, 1970's

Slave units used in Telephone Exchanges and also in Post Offices for many years, these were driven by a master long case clock situated in the Exchange.

See Item A0073

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A0351

Image of GPO EXCHANGE OR MASTERCLOCK, 1960's

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GPO EXCHANGE OR MASTERCLOCK, 1960's

Pendulum clock used in telephone exchanges, for timing functions.
Item A0357 is the relay unit for this.
Using the Hipp toggle principal which swings the pendulum by pulling it every so often by a magnet powered by electric pulses, supplied only when the momentum of the swing started to die.
This unit uses a modified version of this system.
Matthaeus Hipp in 1838 is reported to have invented the toggle in a dream, at a very early age. He got up and drew it immediately. This is almost certainly fiction.
See http://www.electric-clocks.nl/clocks/en/page04.htm for the history

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A0073

Image of EXCHANGE CLOCK CONTROL UNIT, 1940's

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EXCHANGE CLOCK CONTROL UNIT, 1940's

Used to control equipment connected to the exchange master clock
Item A0073.

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A0357

Image of GPO ENGINEERS BUTT, 1960's

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GPO ENGINEERS BUTT, 1960's

Used by engineers in telephone exchanges, and on the road for testing telephone lines.

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A0043

Image of PAY PHONE DISK TEST COINS, 1970's

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PAY PHONE DISK TEST COINS, 1970's

Used for checking operation of telephone coin boxes.
Sizes are early Metric type.

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A0060

Image of GPO ENGINEERS CLEANER BLOWER, 1950's

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GPO ENGINEERS CLEANER BLOWER, 1950's

Used by cleaners and engineers to blow the dust from telephone equipment.

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A0064

Image of GPO  TELEPHONE OPERATORS HEAD SET, 1950's

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GPO TELEPHONE OPERATORS HEAD SET, 1950's

Headset used by manual switchboard operators.

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A0062

Image of GPO CHEST MICROPHONE, 1940's

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GPO CHEST MICROPHONE, 1940's

Transmitter Breast Sound Powered No2-Mk3
Used by Telephone Switchboard Operators.

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A0908

Image of 25 x 4 UNISELECTOR No 15A, 1950's

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25 x 4 UNISELECTOR No 15A, 1950's

Uniselector for use in Private Automatic Exchanges (PAX).
Origin Unknown.

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A0562

Image of STROWGER MULTI-SELECTOR (UNIDENTIFIED), 1950's

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STROWGER MULTI-SELECTOR (UNIDENTIFIED), 1950's

Multi selector for use in large Private Automatic Exchanges (PAX)

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A0564

Image of STROWGER FINAL SELECTOR, 1970's

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STROWGER FINAL SELECTOR, 1970's

Type 2000 Strowger Final Selector for automatically connecting up to 100 telephone circuits to one.
If more units are linked together complete telephone numbers can be selected.

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A0559

Image of PO PRE 2000 SELECTOR, 1950's

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PO PRE 2000 SELECTOR, 1950's

Exchange Strowger Selector. Used before the new 2000 series, which looks similar.
For automatically connecting up to 100 telephone circuits to one.
If more units are linked together complete telephone numbers can be selected.

The unit is shown on its side, for the correct orientation see Item A0559

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A0951

Image of STROWGER SELECTOR, 1970's

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STROWGER SELECTOR, 1970's

Strowger type multi selector in use up until the late 70's.
Up to 100 telephone lines can be selected with this unit.

The unit is shown on its side, for the correct orientation see Item A0559

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A0741

Image of GPO DYNAMOTOR No 50A, 1970's

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GPO DYNAMOTOR No 50A, 1970's

Dynamotor for generating all the tones necessary in a telephone exchange including the voltage for the ring signal.
also the tones including, Park, Busy and Number unobtainable.

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A0558

Image of SIEMENS EXCHANGE RING GENERATOR, 1950's

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SIEMENS EXCHANGE RING GENERATOR, 1950's

Used in small telephone systems for creating enough voltage to drive telephone bells.

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A0083

Image of ERICSSON PMX 5 x 40 SWITCHBOARD, 1940's

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ERICSSON PMX 5 x 40 SWITCHBOARD, 1940's

Made by L.M.Ericsson and imported.
Early style manual Switchboard.

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A0059

Image of 3 x 1 SMALL DOLLS EYE EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD), 1940's

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3 x 1 SMALL DOLLS EYE EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD), 1940's

Small manual telephone exchange for one exchange line and three extensions.

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A0528

Image of GPO 5 x 20  DOLLS EYE EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD), 1950's

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GPO 5 x 20 DOLLS EYE EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD), 1950's

Standard GPO design of manual type 'Dolls Eye' Switchboard.

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A0058

Image of GPO 2 x 4 DOLLS EYE SWITCHBOARD, 1950's

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GPO 2 x 4 DOLLS EYE SWITCHBOARD, 1950's

Manual switchboard used in offices between the Wars and after.
Diagram for this unit is N935. (Called 'N' diagrams by the GPO) Possibly dated May 1959

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A0046

Image of RELIANCE PAX, 1940's

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RELIANCE PAX, 1940's

Donated by The Forest of Dean Railway Company where it was in use. Restored and repaired and now in fully working order. PAX stands for Private Automatic Exchange. Some parts are dated 1946.

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A0050

Image of GPO MACADIE KEY SENDER, 1950's

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GPO MACADIE KEY SENDER, 1950's

These units were designed to help Telephone Operators with the fatigue caused by continuous dialling.Invented by Donald Macadie. Patent June 14, 1932

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A0021

Image of GPO TIMER 70A, 1950's

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GPO TIMER 70A, 1950's

Timer unit driven by exchange clock and used for timing functions in the exchange.

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A0079

Image of GPO TIMER 62A, 1970's

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GPO TIMER 62A, 1970's

Used for timing functions in exchanges and driven by the exchange clock.

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A0080

Image of GPO TELEPHONE ENGINEERS TOOLS, 1960's

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GPO TELEPHONE ENGINEERS TOOLS, 1960's

Various G P O Engineers tools Including Thermometer in Wooden tube. Presentation box of adjusting gauges and tools Soldering Iron stand Blower of unknown use. A cardboard box marked relay tools containing 18 x instruments. A metal tube with rotating calibrations on an inside of the tube which looks like a Tensiometer.

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A1566

Image of GAMBRELL BROS EARLY TRANSFORMER, 1930's

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GAMBRELL BROS EARLY TRANSFORMER, 1930's

Telephone Transformer with Ratio of 5/1 Admiralty Pattern 5869

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A0024

Image of INTERNAL WALL TELEPHONE, 1930's

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INTERNAL WALL TELEPHONE, 1930's

Common intercom used in both houses and offices between the wars (and before), all that was needed was a battery and some wire.

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A1227

Image of STERLING PRIMAX  INTERNAL TELEPHONE, 1930's

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STERLING PRIMAX INTERNAL TELEPHONE, 1930's

Common internal telephone for homes and offices.
Required only wires, two units and a battery.

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A1234

Image of STERLING 'PRIMAX' INTERNAL TELEPHONES, 1930's

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STERLING 'PRIMAX' INTERNAL TELEPHONES, 1930's

Common internal telephone for homes and offices. Required only two or up to ten units wires and a battery.

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A1472

Image of A &  B KIOSK BOX  BACK BOARD AND TELEPHONE, 1940's

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A & B KIOSK BOX BACK BOARD AND TELEPHONE, 1940's

Standard GPO Telephone Kiosk contents with a 200 series Bakelite telephone and 1960's back board.
Below is an area where the Telephone Directories would be housed.
See Item A1147

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A0825

Image of A and B COIN PHONE RENTERS UNIT, 1960's

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A and B COIN PHONE RENTERS UNIT, 1960's

This type of back board and coin box was rented for installation in public houses and hall ways, originally designed by Hall Telephone Accessories Co Ltd around 1930, the design remained the same for over 30 years, only replacing the Tulip Mouthpiece and Butter Stamp Receiver with the Neophone Desk Set 232

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A0065

Image of TELEPHONE COVER, 1930's

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TELEPHONE COVER, 1930's

Used to cover unsightly telephones.

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A0045

Image of TELEPHONE COVER, 1930's

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TELEPHONE COVER, 1930's

Used to cover and hide telephone.

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A0952

Image of STERDY APARTMENT TELEPHONE, 1960's

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STERDY APARTMENT TELEPHONE, 1960's

Used for apartment entry system, button is to release door.

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A0958

Image of ERICSSON FIELD TELEPHONE, 1920's

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ERICSSON FIELD TELEPHONE, 1920's

Could have been used as a Trench Phone or more likely to be an Engineers Test Set.
Normally with a leather case, but this is missing.

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A0026

Image of GPO ENGINEERS TEST SET, 1950's

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GPO ENGINEERS TEST SET, 1950's

GPO test set used by engineers to test lines, can be carried over shoulder.

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A0027

Image of DICTOGRAPH DICTOMATIC OFFICE SWITCHBOARD, 1950's

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DICTOGRAPH DICTOMATIC OFFICE SWITCHBOARD, 1950's

The Dictograph Company was formed in 1902 with the first surveillance room bugging device.

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A0049

Image of RELIANCE MASTER or EXECUTIVE INTERCOM STATION, 1970's

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RELIANCE MASTER or EXECUTIVE INTERCOM STATION, 1970's

Office Telephone system with no external line connections.
Transistorised amplifier for microphone in the front for hands free use.
Speaker underneath.
Usually fitted in senior managers and directors offices.

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A0048

Image of RELIANCE INTERNAL EXTENSION DESK TELEPHONE, 1960's

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RELIANCE INTERNAL EXTENSION DESK TELEPHONE, 1960's

Internal telephone system used this phone as a direct method of communication without an exchange.
On the base is marked 15DJITS.

Donated by Ansafone

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A0025

Image of 10 CORE LEAD COVERED TELEPHONE CABLE, 1900's

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10 CORE LEAD COVERED TELEPHONE CABLE, 1900's

Telephone cable for underground use, protected by a thick lead sheath.

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A0575

Image of STC 1800 41B CABLE, 1930's

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STC 1800 41B CABLE, 1930's

Sample of underground telephone cable.
The wires are insulated with paper and the cables were laid in airtight ducts, air was pumped in occasionally to check for leaks, as moisture caused problems with the insulation.

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A0568

Image of LEAD BAND TELEPHONE MARKER, 1933

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LEAD BAND TELEPHONE MARKER, 1933

Band marker for ducted cables for identification and destination.

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A0580

Image of LEAD SHEATH TELEPHONE MARKER, 1934

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LEAD SHEATH TELEPHONE MARKER, 1934

Band markers for ducted cables for identification and destination.

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A0579

Image of CHROME RING TELEPHONE CABLE, 1930's

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CHROME RING TELEPHONE CABLE, 1930's

Sample of underground telephone cable.
The wires are insulated with paper and the cable were laid in airtight ducts, air was pumped in occasionally to check for leaks, as moisture caused problems with the insulation. the outer covering is Gutta Percha.
This sample is held together by a chrome ring for display purposes.

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A0569

Image of NYLON COATED TELEPHONE CABLE, 1960's

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NYLON COATED TELEPHONE CABLE, 1960's

Data cable with armour protection, coated in hemp which has been saturated with a mixture for under ground use.
The Transcontinental Cable System or L-carrier system, was developed by AT&T to create a hardened Telecom network using coaxial cable for long distance communications. There were five phases of development of the system, designated by the Bell System as L-1 through L-5. Later versions were hardened against the dangers of the cold war.

The initial systems in the 1930s had 600 voice channels, far more than could be carried by balanced pair carrier systems, and cheaper per channel for high-usage routes. This version was standardized as "L-1" in 1941. Each successive version had at least twice as many channels as the previous version, culminating in the L5 design in the 1970s, which used the then-novel error-control method of feed-forward. AT&T Long Lines built two coast to coast systems of L3 as well as shorter ones connecting major cities, especially the big cities of the eastern United States, as a supplement to the mainstay microwave radio relay systems. Many were later upgraded to L4. L-carrier systems were loaded by multiplexing and super multiplexing Single side-band channels.

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A0574

Image of GPO COAXIAL UNDERGROUND CABLE, 1960's

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GPO COAXIAL UNDERGROUND CABLE, 1960's

Example of underground coaxial cable on display stand. The inner conductor is air spaced for better performance, air is one of the best insulators. The conductor is held in the centre by nylon discs. For an explanation of coaxial Telephone cables see Item A0574 above.

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A0063

Image of BT MULTI PAIR PAPER INSULATED TELEPHONE CABLE, 1970's

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BT MULTI PAIR PAPER INSULATED TELEPHONE CABLE, 1970's

Telephone cable usually laid in sealed ducts, containing hundreds of wires all identified by a colour code system, the only insulation being paper.
Once installed all joints were made with molten lead wiped with a cloth similar to old lead plumbing, the cable itself had to be kept dry, and the ducts were pumped full of air to check for leaks regularly.

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A0577

Image of WALT DISNEY CHARACTER PHONE OF GOOFY, 1990's

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WALT DISNEY CHARACTER PHONE OF GOOFY, 1990's

Novelty Table phone from the 80's and 90's before the advent of mobile phones started taking over from land lines.

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A1565

Image of NOVELTY PHONE OF A DUCK, 1990's

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NOVELTY PHONE OF A DUCK, 1990's

Novelty Table phone from the 80's and 90's before the advent of mobile phones started taking over from land lines.

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A1564

Image of NOVELTY PHONE OF MICKEY MOUSE & DONALD DUCK, 1990's

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NOVELTY PHONE OF MICKEY MOUSE & DONALD DUCK, 1990's

Novelty Table phone from the 80's and 90's before the advent of mobile phones started taking over from land lines.

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A1563

Image of STC EXECUTEL MODEL 3910, 1984

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STC EXECUTEL MODEL 3910, 1984

Micro processor controlled telephone.

The advertising campaign for the Executel said "Possibly the most well featured desktop telephone terminal ever manufactured" and "Whos a clever little integrated, multifunctional, network-linked, public-data, desk communication terminal, then!"

The STC Executel was an all-in-one communications system designed for executive office use. It was launched in 1984 but was not very successful. Features included: Telephone, Directory, Diary, Notepad, Viewdata, Calculator, Clock and Security.

Donated by John Barnes

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A1483

Image of STC PAGER, 1979

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STC PAGER, 1979

The STC Radio pager weighs 60grams can be clipped on a belt and has four tone patterns that are activated by dialling the correct number by the caller, this way a person can be contacted wherever they are, and also know, by the tone what type the call might be.
Operating in the 150 Mhz and using FSK (Frequency shift keying) modulation with a digital data rate of 512 bits per second.

Nortel Collection

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A1467

Image of STC STAR PHONE TRANSCEIVER , 1970

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STC STAR PHONE TRANSCEIVER , 1970

Claimed in 1979 as the worlds smallest Radio-telephone.
Operating the band 450-470 Mhz, the units can talk to each other or with the separate styled base station, reception is possible up to a range of two to three miles using an antenna 100 feet above ground.

Nortel Collection

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A1466

Image of QUEEN ELIZABETH 11 SILVER JUBILEE TRIMPHONE (DELTAPHONE), 1977

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QUEEN ELIZABETH 11 SILVER JUBILEE TRIMPHONE (DELTAPHONE), 1977

Classic telephone made for the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth 2 called a Trimphone (STC Deltaphone)

Donated to the Nortel archive by Cyril Miller in 2006

Nortel Collection

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A1464

Image of CLASSIC TELEPHONE MADE BY STC, 1977

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CLASSIC TELEPHONE MADE BY STC, 1977

Standard Telephone and Cables started the reproduction era with this phone, they called it the ''Classic''.
Launched on the 30th of May 1977, the press release noted ''A new era in telephone marketing in the United Kingdom began on May 30 when STC launched its own brand name telephone to the public in three trial areas in the country''.
The three areas chosen were Middlesbrough, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Guildford.

Donated to the Nortel archive by Cyril Miller in 2006

Nortel Collection

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A1465

Image of MOTOROLA CELLULAR PHONE, 1980's

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MOTOROLA CELLULAR PHONE, 1980's

An early example of a mobile phone, before true hand-held mobile phones were introduced.
This one would normally be mounted in a vehicle because of its weight.
Model S 1551A

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A0041

Image of MOTOROLA DYNA TAC MOBILE PHONE 8000S, 1986

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MOTOROLA DYNA TAC MOBILE PHONE 8000S, 1986

The world's first mobile phone was the Motorola Dyna TAC 8000x. It went on sale in 1983 in the US at the staggering price of $3995, and despite the price tag, was an instant success and had waiting lists of up to six months! It went on sale in the UK on 1st January 1985 and the very first phone call was made by Ernie Wise! It was followed in the UK in 1986 by the 8000s & in 1988 by the 8500x and in the US in 1990 by the 8000m. These phones are all analogue.

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A1336

Image of MOTOROLA 8800X MOBILE PHONE, 1990

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MOTOROLA 8800X MOBILE PHONE, 1990

The 8800x, 8900x & 888 were the new generation of the brick phones as they were slimmer than the previous 8000 and 8500 series models. They were just as high and wide, but a whole 2cm less deep! The 8800x and 8900x were made from 1990 to 1994 and were designed for the UK market. In the US they were branded as Classic and Ultra Classic. Some have an LED (Light Emitting Diode) display and some have a modern LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) display that we still use today. Some had a large LED display and some early ones had the smaller rarer LED display. The ones with the small LED's are the most collectible. All these phones are analogue.

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A1343

Image of MOTOROLA MICRO TAC 9800X FLIP TOP MOBILE PHONE, 1991

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MOTOROLA MICRO TAC 9800X FLIP TOP MOBILE PHONE, 1991

The worlds first flip phone was the Motorola Micro TAC 9800X launched in 1989. It's a design that is still seen today on millions of mobile phones around the world. The phones and batteries may have got smaller and more powerful, but the basic design is still there. The early phones were all analogue, and had the small LED display that is sought after by collectors. The later phones had the modern LCD display and some of them were digital and can still be used today. One of the best features of these phones is the antenna, which pulls up from the top of the phone. The antenna is just a piece of plastic and has no affect on reception. The phones antenna is internal, but it was felt that customers would want to see an external antenna, so one was added! On the 9800X the microphone was built into the flip part of the phone, but on all other models, it was in the body of the phone and the grooves cut into the flip are just for show. The basic design was used in many different types of phones, branded with many different names. Some of those phones didn't have the flip, some did.

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A1346

Image of PANASONIC MOBILE PHONE, 1990's

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PANASONIC MOBILE PHONE, 1990's

Panasonic mobile phone used in the late 1990's.

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A0930

Image of NORTHERN TELECOM DISPLAY TELEPHONE, 1979

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NORTHERN TELECOM DISPLAY TELEPHONE, 1979

Only stores phone Numbers and addresses, and other general information, once the number has been selected the unit phones automatically.

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A0042

Image of GPO EARLY TELEPHONE DIRECTORY, 1906

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GPO EARLY TELEPHONE DIRECTORY, 1906

South East England Phone Directory.
This very interesting Directory has a hard red cover, and was donated to the museum by the daughter of it's original owner.

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A1111

Image of 1968/9 LONDON TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES A-Z, 1968

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1968/9 LONDON TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES A-Z, 1968

Four Telephone Directories from the 1960's.
The curator found her mothers old telephone number in one of these books.

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A1147

Image of GPO LINE  INSULATORS AND WALL BRACKET, 1940's

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GPO LINE INSULATORS AND WALL BRACKET, 1940's

Fitted to walls, and can still be seen to this day, they were used by the Post Office Telephone Department, to suspend bare wires made of a mixture of Cadmium and Copper in exactly tested proportions to carry the weight of the telephone line over long distances. Before 'Drop Cabling' which was two wires insulated in Vulcanized Rubber, and underground Ducts were introduced in the early 1930's , all telephone lines were suspended airborne between poles and brackets similar to these.

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A0350

Image of GPO BELL SET No 25, 1940's

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GPO BELL SET No 25, 1940's

Bell set for use with Post office Systems or the 200 series telephone that had no bell incorporated.

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A0739

Image of GPO TELEPHONE BELL SET No 41, 1930's

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GPO TELEPHONE BELL SET No 41, 1930's

Originally a Bell Set No1 later converted to a No 41 in 1985.
Designed to be used with pillar phones or the series 200 types.

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A0746

Image of TELEPHONE No 332, 1950's

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TELEPHONE No 332, 1950's

332 type telephone, which is part of the Telephone Exchange Item A0798. Below
The Telephone Exchange was reported as being used in the police station, in the TV series Z Cars, seen in the 1950's.

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A0800

Image of TMC EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD), 1950's

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TMC EXCHANGE (SWITCHBOARD), 1950's

Telephone Exchange that was reported as being used in the police station of the TV series Z Cars in the 1950's
See Item A0800

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A0798

Image of FONADEK TELEPHONE ADAPTOR, 1960's

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FONADEK TELEPHONE ADAPTOR, 1960's

A 2 X Valve Amplifier for Bakelite Telephones this was still being used in the 1960's, thus enabling 'Hands Free' conversation.

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A0892

Image of GPO  ANSWERING SET No 1A, 1970's

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GPO ANSWERING SET No 1A, 1970's

British Telecom and the GPO leased and Rented this unit, which answered calls with a personally recorded message.
Unfortunately no callers message could be recorded. This unit is marked BT.

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A0035

Image of ANSAFONE J10 OR MK1 ANSWERING SET, 1950's

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ANSAFONE J10 OR MK1 ANSWERING SET, 1950's

Ansafone Ltd launched their newly named company with this model.
Until the 1970's Ansafone was one of only 3 companies to be licensed by the Post Office to make and sell Telephone Answering machines in this country.
Two of the museum's Trustees worked for Ansafone, and this item brings back happy memories for both of them.

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A0782

Image of GPO UNIT TRANSFER INTERCOM, 1935

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GPO UNIT TRANSFER INTERCOM, 1935

This unit is fitted with two 'doll's eye' indicators, one (labelled Exch) for exchange line calling and clearing and one, (labelled EXTN) for non-multiple station calling and clearing.
The unit contains a buzzer which can be operated by both indicators.

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A0779

Image of GPO SECRECY PHONE 300 TYPE, 1941

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GPO SECRECY PHONE 300 TYPE, 1941

For use with secrecy scrambler box.
See item A0753.

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A0039

Image of SECRECY SCRAMBLER SET No 8, 1950's

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SECRECY SCRAMBLER SET No 8, 1950's

The Secrecy Set No8 distorts the signal to an unrecognisable mush, the circuit is then reversed at the receiving end.
It would not be difficult to un-distort the message that is sent down the line. This machine is a Transistorised version of the valve equivalent used after the war, and supplied by the British Post Office for commercial use only.

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A0753

Image of PREDETERMINED AUTO DIALLER, 1930's

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PREDETERMINED AUTO DIALLER, 1930's

Telephone early automatic dialler, on the drum are a selection of names when the drum is moved such that the name required is in the window on the front, the lever handle is turned, this resets all the pins inside accept those for the name chosen, also at the back of the pins is a dial mechanism that is set to the movement scanning all the pins, as it passes over the protruding pins set earlier by the drum, the contact on the dial pulses out the correct number across the telephone line.

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A0757

Image of WALL TELEPHONE No 311, 1930's

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WALL TELEPHONE No 311, 1930's

Wall Telephone for use with internal systems around the 1930's probably supplied by the GPO.
Manufacturer unknown.

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A0726

Image of GPO TELEPHONE  248, 1930's

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GPO TELEPHONE 248, 1930's

The 248 two extension phone replaced the bell set No20, see item A0012

Donated by Mac Mclane

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A0013

Image of BELL SET 20 ONE EXTENSION, 1930's

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BELL SET 20 ONE EXTENSION, 1930's

Used by butlers & secretaries to transfer one telephone line to two extensions. Also used for home extensions.

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A0012

Image of WESTERN ELECTRIC WALL TELEPHONE, 1940's

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WESTERN ELECTRIC WALL TELEPHONE, 1940's

Telephones of this style were still being used in the southern states of U.S.A. well into the 1960's.

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A0078

Image of GEC RAILWAY TELEPHONE, 1940's

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GEC RAILWAY TELEPHONE, 1940's

Type of instrument commonly used by the railways.

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A0067

Image of ERICSSON LOCAL BATTERY  WALL TELEPHONE, 1940's

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ERICSSON LOCAL BATTERY WALL TELEPHONE, 1940's

Wall telephone for internal use only, normally found on railway installations, and fire stations, the Magneto generator, attached to the handle on the side, is big enough to drive many bells, and the box is big enough to carry local batteries.

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A0066

Image of HOUSEHOLD WALL TELEPHONE, 1930's

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HOUSEHOLD WALL TELEPHONE, 1930's

Household Internal Telephone, with six extensions and no external line capability

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A0006

Image of GPO 312 TELEPHONE, 1936

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GPO 312 TELEPHONE, 1936

Black version of 300 series telephone. Used from 1938 to 1965.

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A0017

Image of GEC TELEPHONE No 312, 1955

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GEC TELEPHONE No 312, 1955

Standard Telephone produced for the GPO in the 1950's known as the 'Cheese Dish' Telephone. Used from 1938 to 1965.
Fitted with a plastic curly cable, which was replacing the cotton cables, as the new plastic telephones came into use.

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A0053

Image of GPO 162F TELEPHONE, 1932

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GPO 162F TELEPHONE, 1932

The first British phone of this design using the new material (Bakelite) Siemans Brothers called the new handset the Neophone. Introduced in 1929.
General Electric GEC called it the Gecophone. This could replace the tele 150 in almost all applications as it also required a bellset, however the GEC version could have an internal bell.
The old candle stick design was still provided, as the 162F transmitter was not suitable for central battery use.

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A0014

Image of GPO 232 TELEPHONE AND BELL SET 26, 1949

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GPO 232 TELEPHONE AND BELL SET 26, 1949

As the 232 telephone had no bell internally, see item A0015, one option was to mount a standard wall Bell Set underneath the telephone as in this assembly.

Donated by Mac Mclane

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A0020

Image of GEC 332 TELEPHONE, 1950's

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GEC 332 TELEPHONE, 1950's

Dating from the late 1930's and originally conceived in Sweden by Ericsson this is an improved version of the 232 type.
With self contained bell.
Also available in Red, Black and Green.
Many variants are seen, some with internal bell generators, green handsets for scramble use (secrecy) or red handsets for priority use.

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A0016

Image of GPO 232 TELEPHONE, 1949

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GPO 232 TELEPHONE, 1949

Follow up to the 162F almost identical but made using different moulds, Used from 1929 to 1959, also it provided an anti side tone coil which reduced the level of the users voice in the earpiece prompting them to speak up.
Also provided in Chinese Red and Ivory, or they could be painted provided the subscriber paid the cost of restoring them back to black.
This unit also requires an external bell set.

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A0015

Image of PINK TELEPHONE COVER, 1955

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PINK TELEPHONE COVER, 1955

Rare plastic cover for 300 series Telephone, probably a limited edition.

Telephone cover and telephone donated by Mrs Goodall,

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A0023

Image of MAGNETO TELEPHONE, 1947

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MAGNETO TELEPHONE, 1947

Internal extension for systems and switchboards that require magneto ringing, i.e., a hand cranked generator to create enough voltage to call, or ring the bell at the other end, otherwise the instrument is a standard telephone without a dial.
Although marked Phoenix Telephone & Electric Works Ltd
It is possible that this unit was manufactured by Ericsson.

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A1473

Image of FRENCH DUMPY CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE, 1941

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FRENCH DUMPY CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE, 1941

Made in France by CH Milde Fils & Cie and known as a French Candlestick.
Telephone Model 1941.

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A0019

Image of ATEA TELEPHONE, 1950's

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ATEA TELEPHONE, 1950's

The instrument originated from a 1930s design without the handle and a different handset style, made by ETEA in Belgium which was associated with Automatic Electric of Chicago.
This model dates from 1956 and was known as the U56, many were shipped abroad and used on private networks in the UK, it was made by BTMC or the 'Bell Telephone Manufacturing Company' in Belgium.
Known as a ''Teapot Telephone'' by some?. The bell transfer has been added and is not original.

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A0022

Image of SIEMENS RAILWAY WALL TELEPHONE, 1960's

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SIEMENS RAILWAY WALL TELEPHONE, 1960's

Type of instrument normally used for internal use in offices, and also by the railways.

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A0068

Image of AMERICAN SHIPS WALL TELEPHONE, 1940's

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AMERICAN SHIPS WALL TELEPHONE, 1940's

Type of telephone used on board ships, probably during the Second World War.
Model SW

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A0069

Image of ERICOFONE, 1960's

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ERICOFONE, 1960's

Made by Ericsson of Sweden and sold in this country via Post Office Telephones, as the risk of de-monopolising the GPO by the Government got closer.

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A0038

Image of GEC TELEPHONE No 706, 1970's

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GEC TELEPHONE No 706, 1970's

The 706 telephone preceded the 746 type. It had hand wiring inside with only one small PCB that plugged into the base, the body was made of injection moulded strong plastic.
This model replaced the 300 series Bakelite telephones of the 1940's.

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A0530

Image of TELEPHONE No 710 WITH SECRECY BUTTON, 1960's

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TELEPHONE No 710 WITH SECRECY BUTTON, 1960's

Telephone used in the Museum as a handling item for demonstrating the Secrecy Set No8. See Item No A0753. With number and lettered dial bezel.

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A0749

Image of 2/764 PUSH BUTTON TELEPHONE, 1978

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2/764 PUSH BUTTON TELEPHONE, 1978

The 756 was a push button loop disconnect telephone first introduced in 1979, based on the 746 telephone. With the advent of new style wiring the 756 was renumbered the 8756 and was fitted with a 4000 ohm high impedance bell and a new style line cord fitted with a 431A plug.
The 756 was initially available in two standard colours, ivory and grey, later a brown version was added.

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A1381

Image of GPO WALL TELEPHONE No 711, 1960's

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GPO WALL TELEPHONE No 711, 1960's

Standard GPO style 706, wall mounted version, Type 711, with numbered dial bezel.

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A0056

Image of GPO IVORY 746 TELEPHONE WITH NEON HANDSET No7, 1970's

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GPO IVORY 746 TELEPHONE WITH NEON HANDSET No7, 1970's

Table top No746 telephone with neon indicator on the top of the handset which flashes when the phone rings.
Designed for the deaf or hard of hearing.

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A0523

Image of GPO TRIMPHONE (DELTAPHONE), 1960's

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GPO TRIMPHONE (DELTAPHONE), 1960's

The Trimphone was introduced as the threat of de-monopolising the GPO was about to be introduced, it suffered from one problem, the transmitter (microphone) was poor quality.
It also introduced a chirping sound instead of a bell,
Originally developed in 1964 by STC and known as the Deltaphone.


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A0037

Image of WINDSOR SEE THROUGH NOVELTY TELEPHONE, 1970's

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WINDSOR SEE THROUGH NOVELTY TELEPHONE, 1970's

Typical novelty phone with see through case and flashing neons when it rings.

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A0018

Image of GPO TELEPHONE 746F, 1960's

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GPO TELEPHONE 746F, 1960's

Replaced the 300 series style in 1967 after the 706 pattern,introduced in 1959. Various improvements had been made although the appearance is similar.

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A0036

Image of GPO TELEPHONE  706, 1960's

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GPO TELEPHONE 706, 1960's

Supplied by Advance Telephones.
Standard GPO Style 706. Introduced in 1959.

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A0054

Image of WALT  DISNEY CHARACTER PHONE, 1976

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WALT DISNEY CHARACTER PHONE, 1976

The original version with dial sold in America then imported. Phones similar to these with buttons are still available today, and can be found in antique shops selling for twice the price they can be purchased for new. Date unknown. The one shown is "Mickey Mouse".

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A0055


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