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The telephone, who really invented it?

The telephone, who really invented it?


Image of RELIANCE EXPORT DRY CELL (battery), 1930's

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RELIANCE EXPORT DRY CELL (battery), 1930's

Originally designed for local battery telephones, and were installed inside the phone itself. See item A0007.

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A0271

Image of BELL'S GALLOWS PHONE  (Replica), 1875

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BELL'S GALLOWS PHONE (Replica), 1875

Bell's Gallows Phone spurred Bell and Watson to produce their first Telephone Patent on March 7th 1876. They beat Elisha Grey by only a few hours. This has been contested by Grey, who was working on their liquid transmitter. Bell's device was a version of his multiple telegraph, from which this design is based.

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A0008

Image of BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONE, 1900's

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BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONE, 1900's

So called because it is shaped like a butter stamp.
This early telephone instrument was used for transmitting and receiving.

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A1017

Image of PO TELEPHONE No. 59, 1900's

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PO TELEPHONE No. 59, 1900's

Used by the General Post Office as No 59, the box, made of Walnut contained 2 Dry Cells or Leclanche cells, as this phone was powered locally (LB local battery). Designed by Ericsson in 1899 and taken over by the National Telephone Company, formed in 1885 from both the Bell & Edison Companies at the time. Similar to the Sterling U373 which has the handset at the side.

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A0007

Image of FIELD TELEPHONE, 1900's

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FIELD TELEPHONE, 1900's

Origin and make unknown, believed to have been made in the late 19th century , as it uses a Deckert type Transmitter of that period.

This item is also shown on our mysteries page.

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A0002

Image of SPOON RECEIVER OR EARPIECE, 1900's

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SPOON RECEIVER OR EARPIECE, 1900's

Part of a telephone unit , listening was carried out on this unit, it was not used for speaking into, a Transmitter was provided for this.
The rest of the instrument is missing.

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A0032

Image of STERLING No 2  (CANDLESTICK) PHONE, 1906

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STERLING No 2 (CANDLESTICK) PHONE, 1906

The Candlestick, used with bell set No 1, replaced earlier golf ball style candlesticks, introduced in 1901. It was made by Western Electric and was first used by the National Telephone Company, taken over by the Post Office also as a No 2. The unit shown was manufactured by Sterling Telephone and Electric Company Ltd. Described as a central battery table telephone (pillar phone) having a solid black granular transmitter, with adjustable joint and enamelled brass base. No internal circuitry was provided other than the receiver hook switch, this was all provided in the bell box, which is connected to this instrument, (not shown).

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A0003

Image of L.M.ERICSSON GPO TELEPHONE No.16, circa 1909

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L.M.ERICSSON GPO TELEPHONE No.16, circa 1909

This instrument was designated the No.16 by the British Post Office and was in use until the 1950's. It is based on an earlier design introduced in 1895 which looked almost identical and was supplied to the National Telephone Company.

The example shown was made for the GPO by L.M.Ericsson and is is marked No.16. The transfers are almost certainly not original.

Also known as a 'Skeleton Phone' or 'Eiffel Tower' in America.

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A0001

Image of BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONES, 1920's

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BUTTERSTAMP TELEPHONES, 1920's

Talking and listening was achieved by using these instruments.

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A0885

Image of GPO MODEL 150  CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE, 1920's

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GPO MODEL 150 CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE, 1920's

Candlestick telephone, introduced in 1906, it was used with a bell set No 1a see item A0746.
When the automatic exchanges came in, this design replaced the Telephone No 2, as dials were introduced.

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A0009

Image of INTERNAL TELEPHONE, 1920's

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INTERNAL TELEPHONE, 1920's

A small wooden telephone used in offices or coal mines for one to one communication. Two units and a small battery is all that is required to work these units. Working with this instrument in coal mines could be a problem if there was gas around, never the less such units were seen in mines in the early days of Telephones. Strict rules would apply to their use but communication was as important as safety and the position of the instrument was carefully considered.

Known as a 'Direct Line Wall Telephone Set'

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A0010

Image of TMC PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

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TMC PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

Replacement for earlier skeleton phone .
See item A0001.

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A0033

Image of JYDSK PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

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JYDSK PILLAR TELEPHONE, 1920's

This model replaced the earlier skeleton style (See Item A0001) and was probably manufactured by Telefonfeabrikker of Horsons. For Jydsk (Jutland). Telefon Aktieselskab marked on the front.

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A0031

Image of GPO 121F WALL TELEPHONE, 1924

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GPO 121F WALL TELEPHONE, 1924

Made from around 1924. Wall version of GPO model 150 Telephone.
Made originally from the Bell set No1 Item A1089.

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A0011

Image of WALLIGRAPH  CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE HOLDER, 1930's

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WALLIGRAPH CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE HOLDER, 1930's

Wall mounted telephone holder for Candlestick telephones.

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A0084

Image of HUSH-A-PHONE ADAPTOR, 1940

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HUSH-A-PHONE ADAPTOR, 1940

Hush-A-Phone Corporation marketed a small, cup-like device, from as early as 1921, by Tom Carter, which mounted on the speaking party's phone, reducing the risk of conversations being overheard and increasing sound fidelity for the listening party. A,T&T took the company to court, objecting to other manufacturers making attachments to there phones in 1956. Hush A Phone won the case. Reviewed in Popular Mechanics February 1941. Two versions were available one for the candlestick phone (this one) and one for the new 'Neophone' single piece handset.

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A1441

Image of ENAMALLED TELEPHONE SIGN, 1950's

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ENAMALLED TELEPHONE SIGN, 1950's

Signs like these used to be common place outside anywhere that could sell the facility described, most common were Post Offices.

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A1380


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