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EDDYSTONE EB35  COMMUNICATION RECEIVER, 1968

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EDDYSTONE EB35 COMMUNICATION RECEIVER, 1968

This is a domestic receiver of 1968 receiving AM and FM with 6 bands, fully transistorised and used by wireless amateurs in the early 1970,s operating from battery or mains. It used Germanium transistors which suffer badly with age, it is unlikely that any of these sets will still work without major repair. the ranges were 88-108 FM, AM 8.5-22MHz, 3.5-8.5MHz, 1.5-3.5MHz, 550-1500Khz, 150-350Khz.

Your comments:

  • My EB35 still works perfectly with the original transistors. It is a MK1, don't know the exact year but I turn it on everyday. I have a fairly large collection of domestic radios most of which are valve radios and this is by far the most sensitive. It was made just a few miles up the road from my home
    .......... Derek, Redditch, Worcestershire , 4th of April 2015

  • I have the Eddystone EB-35 and it is still in perfect order.
    FM is great and all the other bands do what they were intended to do.
    This is a marvellous piece of equipment and in everyday use as my bedside radio
    .......... Johan Classen ZS6IAM, Pretoria RSA, 2nd of March 2012

  • This is a domestic receiver of 1968 receiving AM and FM with 6 bands, fully transistorized and used by short wave listeners in the early 1970ís operating from battery or mains. It used Germanium transistors which can suffer from age-related failure due to internal metallic crystal growth from the metal encapsulation (tin), and thus many of these sets will not work without major repair. The tuning ranges were 88-108 FM, AM 8.5-22MHz, 3.5-8.5Mhz, 1.5-3.5MHz, 550-1500KHz and 150-350KHz. The museumís example has been modified to include a signal strength meter (ĎS-Meterí), a facility that many short wave listeners and radio amateurs valued to compare the signal strength of stations and as a tuning aid. The meter usually measures the voltage on the automatic gain control (AGC) line in the receiver as the AGC voltage responds to signal strength.

    .......... Gerry OHara, Canada, 24th of July 2011

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