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A Short History of the Gramophone

A Short History of the Gramophone

A Brief History of Wireless

A Brief History of Wireless


Image of REVOX TAPE RECORDER G36, 1963

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REVOX TAPE RECORDER G36, 1963

In 1963 Several new distributors join Studer to market the Swiss tape recorders in many different countries. Production start of the famous Revox G36. It was sold to the UK market under the name of "Revox 736".
Reel to Reel Recorders using valves, and designed for semi-professional use in 1963 it cost 124 Guineas The REVOX 736 (G36) is a mono/stereo machine with stacked erase heads, separate recording heads separate replay heads, six audio pre-amplifiers. and a push/pull power amplifier. Tape speeds of 3 3/4 and 7 1/2 .i. p. s. are obtained by pole-changing the synchronous Papst capstan motor. Twin-track and four-track models are available, both fully stereo phonic, recording to the latest C.C.I.R. (DIN 45113) characteristic

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A1323

Image of PHLLIPS EL315/15 TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

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PHLLIPS EL315/15 TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

Popular tape recorder of the 1960's using 5inch reels of magnetic tape supplied with a crystal microphone.

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A0380

Image of KYOTO S600  8 TRACK  STEREO PLAYER, 1980's

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KYOTO S600 8 TRACK STEREO PLAYER, 1980's

The original format for magnetic tape sound reproduction was reel-to-reel audio tape recording, first made widely available in the late 1940s. However, threading tape into the recorders was more difficult than simply putting a disc record onto a phonograph player. Manufacturers introduced a succession of cartridges which held the tape inside a metal or plastic housing to eliminate handling. The first was RCA Victor, which in 1958 introduced a cartridge system called Sound Tape or Magazine Cartridge Loading, but until the introduction of the Compact Cassette in 1963 and Stereo 8 in 1965, none were very successful.

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A1277

Image of GRAMDECK CONVERSION FROM RECORD DECK TO TAPE RECORDER, 1950's

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GRAMDECK CONVERSION FROM RECORD DECK TO TAPE RECORDER, 1950's

This was placed on the turntable of a standard record player with a 78rpm, a small peg was mounted on the gramophone deck which located into the gramdec base to hold it steady. The cable attached was connected to the pre-amplifier supplied, and this was in turn connected to an audio power amplifier. A microphone was supplied which could be used via the pre-amplifier for recording. Cost 39 gns, RRP when first introduced.

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A1118

Image of ELIZABETHAN TAPE RECORDER DELUX WITH COLLARO DECK, 1961

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ELIZABETHAN TAPE RECORDER DELUX WITH COLLARO DECK, 1961

Early "Elizabethan" Tape Recorder using a well known Collaro Tape deck.

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A1129

Image of STANDARD TINY PAL RECORDER, 1960's

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STANDARD TINY PAL RECORDER, 1960's

Early pre Cassette recorder for domestic use, although it states Double Track it is not stereo, it simply refers to the possibility of turning the tape over.

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A0166

Image of SONY WALKMAN, 1980's

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SONY WALKMAN, 1980's

Portable cassette player that was small enough to fit into a pocket, famous from 1979.

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A0928

Image of AGAPHONE WIRE RECORDER, 1950's

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AGAPHONE WIRE RECORDER, 1950's

Wire recorders were invented in Denmark by Valdimar Poulson for an answering machine in 1898 called a Telegraphone, but were not developed for any other practical purpose at the time. Ten years later a company in America made a successful dictation machine. They were quickly made obsolete by magnetic tape machines.

Although this machine carries the trade name Agaphone, this unit was certainly made by another company

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A0100

Image of WEBSTER CHICAGO WIRE RECORDER MODEL 180-1 of 1949

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WEBSTER CHICAGO WIRE RECORDER MODEL 180-1 of 1949

Formed in 1914 the Webster Electrical Corp specialised in consumer Audio products up until the 1960's. The Chicago Model 180-1 Electronic Memory wire recorder of 1949 used 0.0036-inch Stainless steel wire travelling at 24 inches per second past a head moving vertically to spread the wire evenly on to the take up spool. The Quality on some models was exceptionally good. In 1952 Webster started production on tape machines, and also started using the trade name Webcor. Webster ceased trading in the 1960's due to competition from foreign imports.

Donated by Jonathan Bell

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A1537

Image of BOOSEY & HAWKS WIREK TYPE 'A' WIRE RECORDER , 1945

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BOOSEY & HAWKS WIREK TYPE 'A' WIRE RECORDER , 1945

Boosey and Hawkes stopped making machines and only produced sheet music after this model.
Valdemar Poulsen, a Danish inventor developed the "Telegraphone" between 1898 -1900 this was a magnetic method using steel wire
Wire recorders were developed in the period from 1900 to the late 1940s, but they were produced only in very small quantities.
They were used by BBC journalists during WWII.
The peak of the wire recorder's short commercial life came in 1948 and 1949.

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A0973

Image of WIRE RECORDER No2 IN CONTAINER, 1940's

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WIRE RECORDER No2 IN CONTAINER, 1940's

Wire for use on wire recorders which were used before tape recording was invented in Germany during WW2. See Item A0973 and A1537.

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A1529

Image of SIMON SOUND SP/2 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1957

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SIMON SOUND SP/2 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1957

Simon Sound Service Ltd London W1. This was used with the ribbon microphone Item A0934.

Donated by Mr P Holmes

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A0933

Image of FERROGRAPH SERIES 6 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

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FERROGRAPH SERIES 6 REEL TO REEL TAPE RECORDER, 1960's

The Ferrograph was semi professional machine seen many times in films and used by the BBC.

This version of the Series 6 is a half track stereo machine with 8.25 inch reels and using standard 1/4 inch tape. A quarter track version was available. It had three motors, two used for fast forward, rewind and back tension and one, a split phase capacitor induction motor, for the flywheel and capstan. This type of motor is almost immune to small variations in voltage or load and is controlled by the mains frequency after reaching its synchronous speed. Three speeds were provided 7.5, 3.75, and 1.125 inches/second. It was extremely heavy using valve amplification and built on a sturdy frame.

The companies Wright and Weare first produced machines in the late forties and eventually introduced the famous Wearite deck seen here

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A0781


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