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The Great War and WWII [1850-1980]

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Home:  Gramophones

Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.


Image of BULGIN GRAMOPHONE SIGNAL LAMP, 1940's

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BULGIN GRAMOPHONE SIGNAL LAMP, 1940's

The box Reads:- Indicates when the amplifier is switched on and throws a white shaft of light on the turntable. A neat switch is incorporated in the base. Highly nickel plated ruby lens fittings. Baseboard fitting. Terminal connections. Price 3/6d

Bruce Hammond collection

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A1502

Image of THE EDISON STANDARD PHONOGRAPH, 1900's

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THE EDISON STANDARD PHONOGRAPH, 1900's

The first commercially produced playing machine. It worked by vibrating the stylus up and down whilst moving across the cylinder (Hill and Dale method).

Prices dropped from $150 in 1891 to $20 in 1899.

Cylinders were 50 cents each.

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A0534

Image of GRAPHAPHONE PHONOGRAPH TYPE Q, 1903

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GRAPHAPHONE PHONOGRAPH TYPE Q, 1903

The Columbia Graphaphone Type Q also known as a QC with lid, was one of the Columbia lowest priced Phonographs selling at a mere $7.50. Made between 1903 and 1905 it plays standard 2 minute cylinders compatible with Edison’s Phonographs. After Sumner Tainter and A.G.Bell of telephone fame got together and produced the first wax cylinders Edison started producing his Phonograph using wax instead of his foil type cylinder, contesting in court that his patent had been infringed, this went on for two years during which, his own product was limited in production. Tainter and Bell succeeded in getting a patent for there wax process and the two companies continued in opposition.

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A1377

Image of TOURNAPHONE/PATHE GRAMOPHONE, 1906

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TOURNAPHONE/PATHE GRAMOPHONE, 1906

This model of the Tournaphone was made in Germany under license before the First World War. Note:- these machines use a jewelled stylus not a needle.

The word gramophone was first used by Alexander Graham Bell when he developed a machine using flat records instead of cylinders, but the principle was the same as Edison's Hill and Dale method (stylus vibrates up and down). Emile Berliner, a German American, first produced flat records that vibrated the stylus from side to side (the opposite of Bell's design).

The Tournaphone was a design developed by 'PATHE' in 1906 and plays Hill and Dale records at 90 rpm starting from the inside moving to the outside. It was easily changed to play ordinary 78 rpm records by turning the sound box, and replacing the jewelled stylus with a needle. 78 rpm records continued till the 1950's, the museum demonstrates 78rpm records on several gramophones including the Tournaphone.

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A0788

Image of EDISON FIRESIDE PHONOGRAPH TYPE , 1909

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EDISON FIRESIDE PHONOGRAPH TYPE , 1909

The Edison Fireside was a compact phonograph that was introduced with the release of four-minute records in 1908. This model was immediately very popular, the mechanism has a factory-installed switch for choosing 2 versus 4 minute records, the Model K reproducer has a swivelling stylus for different types of cylinders, and the horn is the small maroon Morning Glory type. Type 'A' indicates the first in the series of this model.

Donated by Peter and June Carter

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A1463

Image of DECCA PORTABLE REFLECTOR GRAMOPHONE, 1920's

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DECCA PORTABLE REFLECTOR GRAMOPHONE, 1920's

This type of gramophone was a favourite with Officers during the First World War.

There have been many reports of Officers enjoying records behind the lines and some units have been found with bullet damage.

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A0537

Image of WAX CYLINDERS (GOLD TYPE), 1920's

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WAX CYLINDERS (GOLD TYPE), 1920's

These are two minute cylinders played at 160 revolutions per minute, for use with item A0534 the Edison Standard Phonograph. Called gold because of the new process used to make the master in 1902. Edison ceased making cylinders in 1929 when his Phonographic Company closed down.

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A0730

Image of PETER PAN FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1924

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PETER PAN FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1924

Designed to be fully portable in a box similar to cameras of the period.

Donated by Mrs Lilias Johnson

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A0884

Image of STROVIOLS, ONE STRING FIDDLE, 1930's

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STROVIOLS, ONE STRING FIDDLE, 1930's

The instrument on the right is made by the inventor Charles Stroh; on the left is a home made version using a cigar box.

The introduction of Gramophones spurred the idea that greater volume could be achieved by amplifying the sound of an instrument with a horn. Early buskers could not afford the horned version, let alone a real fiddle, so they made their own out of cigar or biscuit boxes.....

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A0802, A0506

Image of HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 109, 1930's

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HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 109, 1930's

The HMV gramophone is a model 109.
of the late 1920's, this one probably 1930's.

This Model 109 was advertised in the company brochure of 1928-1929 The Oak Model costing £10-10-0d Mahogany costing £12-0-0d

HMV, His Masters Voice, a famous style Gramophone from before WW2 and used well into the 1960's. The original style dates from 1913.

78rpm records were still being played well into the 1960's. 78 rpm records are still available, this player can be demonstrated in the museum.

In 1899 'The Gramophone Company' the UK partner to the US Gramophone Co, run by Emile Berliner, purchased the Trademark 'His Masters Voice' using a painting by Francis Barraud showing 'Nipper' the dog listening to a Phonograph, this had to be altered at the Gramophone Company's request, to show one of Berliners Gramophones as the original had an Edison type Phonograph.

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A0538

Image of J.B.WOODROFFE ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

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J.B.WOODROFFE ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

In the 1920's Electric recording was a possibility, the general public were using clockwork Gramophones to play 78 rpm records using acoustic pick ups, as Wireless sets were becoming popular it could be possible if your Wireless had a Gram input on the rear of the set to plug in an Electric pick up similar to one of these. J.B.Woodroffe patented this particular type in 1927 although many similar types were to follow, this was one of the first. It consists of a horseshoe magnet with a moveable armature attached to a standard needle, which fits into the bottom of the unit with a small knurled screw, the coils pick up the movement, and produce a variable current which is amplified by the wireless speaker amplifier.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1500

Image of LISSEN ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

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LISSEN ELECTRIC GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

In the 1920's Electric recording was a possibility, the general public were using clockwork Gramophones to play 78 rpm records using acoustic pick ups, as Wireless sets were becoming popular it could be possible if your Wireless had a Gram input on the rear of the set to plug in an Electric pick up similar to one of these. It consists of a magnet with a moveable armature attached to a standard needle, which fits into the bottom of the unit with the magnet securing it in place, the coils pick up the movement, and produce a variable current which is amplified by the wireless speaker amplifier.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1501

Image of HMV ELECTRIC PICK UP, 1930's

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HMV ELECTRIC PICK UP, 1930's

The acoustic pick up of a standard gramophone is removed and replaced with the unit supplied. The lead is connected to a volume unit which in turn is plugged into the Gram input of a Wireless receiver of the period. The gramophone is used in the normal way after fitting a steel needle to the new pick up, much louder sounds of the records are now emitted from the wireless.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1257

Image of RI AND VARLEY GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

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RI AND VARLEY GRAMOPHONE PICK UP, 1930's

High quality electric Pick Up for converting wind up gramophones for electric insertion to the Gram input of wireless's Gram input terminals. Made by Radio Instruments Ltd,in conjunction with Varley Ltd.

Nortel Collection

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A1328

Image of EDISON BELL MAGNETIC PICK UP CONVERSION, 1930's

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EDISON BELL MAGNETIC PICK UP CONVERSION, 1930's

Wireless was becoming more popular in the early 30's; mechanical gramophones had been around for much longer.

If the acoustic head of a Gramophone was removed and the round block with a pillar for a needle in this kit was mounted in its place, then plugged into the other section which had a 4 pin valve plug on it, the unit could be plugged into the socket on a wireless receiver that was reserved for the valve prior to the speaker valve. This would connect the new electrical pick up to the audio output stage of the receiver, thus using it as an amplifier.

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A0743

Image of GRAMOPHONE POSTCARDS, 1930's

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GRAMOPHONE POSTCARDS, 1930's

In 1929 Raphael Tuck went into the business of producing Gramophone Record Postcards. The English monthly journal Musical Opinion and Music Trades Review had a regular column "Gramophone Gossip". The September 1929 issue contains the following: “Gramophone Record Postcards: Messrs. Raphael Tuck are responsible for an amusing and interesting innovation in the shape of gramophone record picture postcards. Measuring 3in., these discs play for one minute and cost 3d each. Several series are already available, and I have heard admirable demonstrations of "Auld Lang Syne", "Ye Banks and Braes", "Annie Laurie", "Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond". Besides these songs there are orchestral records and cornet and saxophone solos. One immediate result of these postcards has been the installation of portable gramophones in the smaller stations to demonstrate them!“

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A1341

Image of LISSENOLA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

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LISSENOLA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

Classic style of portable gramophone with storage for records in the lid.

Donated by Mrs Edwards

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A0925

Image of COLUMBIA STEEL PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

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COLUMBIA STEEL PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1930's

Gramophone number 100 made in England by Columbia, the Trade Mark for EMI Records.

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A1012

Image of HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 104, 1932

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HMV GRAMOPHONE MODEL 104, 1932

A beautiful example of the famous HMV Gramophone. The sound was fair due to the wooden box, but not as good as some horn types. The style similar to this was first introduced in 1913.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1154

Image of THORENS  'EXCELDA' FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1932

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THORENS 'EXCELDA' FOLDING GRAMOPHONE, 1932

Thorens is a Swiss manufacturer of high-end audio equipment. They are historically renowned for the range of phonographs (turntables) they produce. In addition to audio playback equipment, they are also a historical producer of harmonicas and cigarette lighters, most notably the button activated automatic lighter.

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A0866

Image of KING GEORGE V CHRISTMAS ADDRESS 1935, 1935

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KING GEORGE V CHRISTMAS ADDRESS 1935, 1935

'A Message to the Empire' on a 78rpm record (Broadcast on Christmas Day 1935) H.M.King George V (The profits from this record were paid to Charities nominated by H.M. the King.

Nortel Collection

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A1401

Image of COLUMBIA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1940's

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COLUMBIA PORTABLE GRAMOPHONE, 1940's

Portable gramophone for 78rpm records, common in the 1940's and 50's.

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A0812

Image of 'NIPPER'  ADVERTISING TRADE MARK FOR HMV, 1940's

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'NIPPER' ADVERTISING TRADE MARK FOR HMV, 1940's

Nipper was born in 1884 in Bristol, England, and died in September 1895. It has been claimed by various sources that he was a Jack Russell Terrier, a Fox Terrier, a Rat Terrier, or an American Pit Bull Terrier. He was named Nipper because he tried to bite visitors in the leg.

In 1898, three years after Nipper’s death, his owner painted a picture of Nipper listening intently to a wind-up Edison-Bell cylinder phonograph. On February 11th 1899 he filed an application for copyright of his picture “Dog Looking At and Listening to a Phonograph.” Thinking the Edison-Bell Company might find it useful, he presented it to James E. Hough who (displaying the kind of thinking that would eventually doom the Edison Records company itself) promptly said, “Dogs don’t listen to phonographs”.

On May 31st 1899, Nippers owner went to the Maiden Lane offices of The Gramophone Company with the intention of borrowing a brass horn to replace the original black horn on the painting. Manager, William Barry Owen, suggested that if the artist replaced the entire machine with a Berliner disc gramophone, the Company would buy the painting. A modified form of the painting became the successful trademark of Victor and HMV records, HMV music stores, and RCA.

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A0535

Image of PIXIE PHONE, 1950's

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PIXIE PHONE, 1950's

Toy gramophone with records of nursery rhymes and short stories. Made as a cheap novelty for children during the late 1940's 50's.

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A0964

Image of FIDELITY PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

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FIDELITY PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

The Fidelity player was powered from the mains. Unlike earlier record players this one played 45rpm records, as well as 78rpm with a turn over type cartridge,using a LP stylus and a larger version for 78 records.

The case was made from cardboard and cost £12.10s.6d. Mr. T.Cass bought one for £2 pounds deposit and 12 monthly payments of 10 Shillings and 6 pence.

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A0521

Image of RUCO PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

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RUCO PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1950's

Plays 45 rpm records only. Valve amplifier. 'Garrard' turntable BA.1

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A0919

Image of REGENTONE RECORD PLAYER IN FIBRE CASE, 1960's

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REGENTONE RECORD PLAYER IN FIBRE CASE, 1960's

Portable record player in a small suit case powered from the mains electricity.
Complete with small internal amplifier

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A0522

Image of PLUS-a-GRAM JUNIOR MPA PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1960's

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PLUS-a-GRAM JUNIOR MPA PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER, 1960's

Normally this player would have been connected to the 'Gram' input provided on the back of some radios.

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A0926

Image of SANYO PORTABLE RADIOGRAM, 1970's

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SANYO PORTABLE RADIOGRAM, 1970's

Transistorised Record player and radio.

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A0532


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