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The Great War and WWII [1850-1980]

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Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.


Image of LEADS COUNTERPOISE No2 Mk2, 1950's

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LEADS COUNTERPOISE No2 Mk2, 1950's

No. 2 Mk II Counter-Poise for the Wireless Set No. 19 antenna, and similar. The Counter-Poise has four wire segments which are laid like a cross underneath the radiating antenna. The four wires terminate to a central location at the radios earth terminal to provide an artificial ground plane. Each wire segment is 340 Cm Long.

Donated by Mr T Angove

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A1518

Image of HEADSET No10 PACKED, 1952

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HEADSET No10 PACKED, 1952

Headset No10 for the Wireless Set No19 in original packing, this item literally fell of the back of a lorry in 1952, and is dated April 52. for a view of the headset see Item No A0095

Donated by Mr T Angove

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A1515

Image of HEADSET No10 FOR WS19, 1950's

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HEADSET No10 FOR WS19, 1950's

One type of Headset and microphone used for the Wireless Set No19. Item A0088 and A0871, and WS62 Item A1405.

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A0095

Image of WWII TYPE F FANY HEADSET, 1940's

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WWII TYPE F FANY HEADSET, 1940's

Headset used by The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry F.A.N.Y. as part of the S.O.E. Special Operations Executive. The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry was created in 1907 by Lord Kitchener, as a link organisation between front line fighting units and field hospitals.
Early recruits were drawn from mainly upper middle classes. During WW1 the FANY ran field hospitals, drove ambulances and set up soup kitchens and troop canteens.
In 1938 they became part of Auxiliary Territorial Services (ATS). In 1940 Hugh Dalton, Minister of Economic Warfare, established the Special Operations Executive (SOE). Contact was made with the Commandant of FANY and arranged for her to provide personnel for the SOE.
At first they were used to produce passports, ration books, and other forged documents for use in occupied Europe. Also to decode, encode and transmit messages to and from the field.
In April 1942 Churchill gave his permission to send women in the SOE into Europe.
Since the war the FANY has been known mainly for it's work in the field of military and civil communications.

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A0488

Image of HAND PEDAL GENERATOR Mk810A, 1950's

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HAND PEDAL GENERATOR Mk810A, 1950's

The Mk810A generator also known as 'Generating set AC 45W 110V, hand or pedal driven, No1 Mk1' was intended for powering AC powered equipment such as receiver Mk122 or Mk123. The unit can be pedal or hand operated, and is supplied with all the suitable accessories, on the top of the main unit is a meter indicating up to 150V with two red marks between which the needle should be held whilst turning the pedals. The base plate comes with a chain so it can be attached to a tree trunk or other similar object, also supplied are two clamps for table mounting. The whole unit and parts pack into the box supplied.

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A1461

Image of WW11 CARRIER PIGEON MESSAGE TUBE

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WW11 CARRIER PIGEON MESSAGE TUBE

Attached to the pigeons leg and containing a small rolled paper message, sometimes as thin as a human hair.

Carrier pigeon message tubes were used during WW1 and WW11, during WW1 wireless communication was still in its infancy, and telephones in the theatre of war could only be used over limited distances.

Even microfilm could be transported by this means.

Carrier Pigeon Service (CPS)

The history of the use of carrier pigeons in warfare is indeed a varied and interesting one, with a long and illustrious history. It is believed that the use of carrier pigeons as a messenger service had it origins in antiquity over three thousand years ago by the Egyptians, Persians and Romans; in 1150 A.D., the Sultan of Baghdad strapped capsules filled with papyrus sheets to the leg or back feathers of pigeons, and used them as messengers. They were used as recently as 1990, by the Iraqi Army during the First Gulf War.
Pigeons played a vital part in World War One as they proved to be an extremely reliable way of sending messages. Such was the importance of pigeons that over 100,000 were used in the war with an astonishing success rate of 95% getting through to their destination with their message. The British Army had a unit called the Carrier Pigeon Service (CPS) which was led by Lt. Col. A.H. Osman. Carrier pigeons were used by the British during the Second Battle of Ypres in May of 1915. The Carrier Pigeon Service was only used when telegraph and telephone communications failed and was soon overtaken by the development of Wireless Telegraphy (i.e. Radio), further limiting their usage; hence, they were only used for emergency or espionage purposes. The avian unit saw further success at the Battle of the Somme and at Verdun, often against screens of poisonous gas and heavy shelling from the opposition.
In October 1918, as the war neared its end, 194 American soldiers found themselves trapped by German soldiers. They were cut off from other Allied soldiers and had no working radios. The only chance they had of alerting anybody about their desperate situation was to send a pigeon with their co-ordinates attacked to its leg. The pigeon's name was Cher Ami. When released it flew 25 miles from behind German lines to the Americans headquarters. Cher Ami covered the 25 miles in just 25 minutes. The pigeon was, in fact, shot through the chest by the Germans but continued to fly home. With the "Lost Battalion's" co-ordinates, the Americans launched a rescue and the 194 men were saved. Cher Ami was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm for its astonishing flight. As with other pigeons, it would not have known where the American's nearest headquarters was - its natural homing instincts took over.

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A1295

Image of WWII FANY MORSE KEYS

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WWII FANY MORSE KEYS

Silent Keys used by The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry F.A.N.Y. as part of the S.O.E. Special Operations Executive.

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A0485

Image of WWII  SG BROWN HEAD SET

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WWII SG BROWN HEAD SET

War Department issue DLR headphones of WW2 made by S.G.Brown.

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A0752

Image of WWII ADMIRALTY SIGNAL LAMP, 1944

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WWII ADMIRALTY SIGNAL LAMP, 1944

Admiralty Pattern 378A signalling Heather type. Previously
owned by Renfrew Electric and Refrigeration Co Ltd.

Donated by Arnold Davey

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A1110

Image of WWII MORSE TRAINING SET

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WWII MORSE TRAINING SET

Morse Training set for War Department Wireless Operators

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A1098

Image of WWII US SIGNAL CORPS MORSE KEY, 1943

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WWII US SIGNAL CORPS MORSE KEY, 1943

Morse key from WW2 in original box.

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A1102

Image of WWII BC221-M WAVEMETER

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WWII BC221-M WAVEMETER

Used for Calibrating wireless transceivers. 125KHz to 20MHz heterodyne frequency meter with individual calibration book and internal Xtal calibrator.
Basic accuracy better than 0.034% over temperature range. HS-30 type headset or similar required for operation.
Supplied with one spare set of vacuum tubes inside unit, some units in 1942 were supplied with two spare sets.
Manufactured by Bendix Radio Corporation. Suffix M

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A0102

Image of CALIBRATOR CRYSTAL No10 , 1950's

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CALIBRATOR CRYSTAL No10 , 1950's

The Calibrator, Crystal, No. 10, was designed for the purpose of setting- up a Wireless Set No. 62 accurately on a required spot frequency. The calibrator functions as a C.W. wave meter with continuous coverage over a frequency band of 1.5 Mc/s to 10 Mc/s.

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A1474

Image of PANEL POWER DISTRIBUTION CHARGING UNIT, 1960's

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PANEL POWER DISTRIBUTION CHARGING UNIT, 1960's

Panel Power Distribution N-8.
The unit was supplied with item A1090 to the Civil Defence depot at New Malden. Model ZA46174

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A1090

Image of CIVIL DEFENCE CORPS GENERATOR, 1960's

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CIVIL DEFENCE CORPS GENERATOR, 1960's

Petrol 4 X stroke generator 24 Volts 300Watts.
The unit was supplied to the Civil Defence depot at New Malden. Model CH1-353-5

Donated by Mr & Mrs Appleton

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A1091

Image of BRITISH ARMY MURPHY A41 No2, 1960's

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BRITISH ARMY MURPHY A41 No2, 1960's

The Murphy A41 No 2 was replaced by the Number 3 and then the Racal R351 Manpack.

Donated by the R.E.M.E. Museum

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A0863

Image of MARCONI R1475 RECEIVER, 1951

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MARCONI R1475 RECEIVER, 1951

The Receiver Type R1475 consists of the Receiver Type 88 and the Power Unit Type 360 ( Not in the Museum ).
It is a general purpose ground station Receiver covering a nominal Frequency Band from 2-20 Mc/s in four ranges.

Donated by J D Knowles

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A1011

Image of RACAL RA17L RECEIVER, 1954

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RACAL RA17L RECEIVER, 1954

The RA17 series of communication receivers,were high Quality, valve sets,first produced by Racal,in the the 1950s,they were originally designed for supply to the British Navy.The design proved successful, and they were ultimately used by all the services and were to become the main receiver of the British radio surveillance organisation,known as G.C.H.Q.
This is the unit that put Racal 'on the map', utilising the famous Wadley Loop circuit. The Racal Factory was closed in 2000 bought by an American Company, the factory was in 2006 a derelict site

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A1404

Image of WWII MILITARY RECEIVER RCA AR88

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WWII MILITARY RECEIVER RCA AR88

The AR88 is a general purpose communications receiver manufactured by RCA in the U.S.A between 1941 and 1945.
They were made in large numbers for service use. Most were sent to the U.K. and Russia for the war effort.
They came in 2 versions, the AR88D and the AR88LF (low frequency version). The R.A.F. designation was R1556A and R1556B for the LF version.

They evolved into the CR88 in 1946 with crystal phasing, and the CR88A with an S meter. Later models CR91 and CR91A have the same coverage as the AR88LF.
Model SC-88 is like the CR88 but shows only the band in use.
CR88B is the last version in 1951 and has a crystal calibrator. D89 is a triple diversity version.

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A0907

Image of WIRELESS SET WS62 Mk2, 1945

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WIRELESS SET WS62 Mk2, 1945

Wireless Set No. 62 (WS62) was a general purpose, low-power, semitropical, vehicle station transmitter & receiver designed for short-range use in the high-frequency (HF) radio bands by the British Army during the Second World War. The frequency range covered was 1.6 to 10.0 MHz in two switched bands. It remained in service until the late 1960;s It was used in the Second World War by British Army infantry, the Parachute Regiment and the Special Air Service (SAS) The equipment was also used in Auster and Beaver aeroplanes and the Skeeter helicopter. It was first trialled early in 1944, postwar military production resuming in the early 1950s, and production for commercial applications continuing until 1966. See pyetelecomhistory.org The Wireless set No 62 incorporated its own Power unit and Variometer, unlike its predecessor the WS 22 which incorporated its own Variometer only, the WS 19 incorporated neither, both were additional units.

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A1405

Image of WWII  PYE No 19 MK 3 WIRELESS SET WS19, 1941

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WWII PYE No 19 MK 3 WIRELESS SET WS19, 1941

Made in Britain PYE LTD.
This is the transceiver only, without the 'B' portion.Each WS19 radio unit contains three separate systems. The A set was a High Frequency (HF)
radio transmitter-receiver for communications up to 50 miles.

The B set was Very High Frequency (VHF) transmitter-receiver for short-range line-of-sight communications up to 1 mile.

A separate audio amplifier was provided for intercommunications between members of the crew.

Donated by the R.E.M.E. Museum

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A0871

Image of WWII  MARCONI CR 100 RECEIVER (B28)

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WWII MARCONI CR 100 RECEIVER (B28)

A general purpose communications receiver during World War 2 The Marconi CR100 B28 is a self contained Communications Receiver of super heterodyne type with AVC for use on CW or Phone reception.

As with other versatile equipment of the Forties, the CR100 was subject to a number of variations, most of them minor in specification, to suit particular Service needs.

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A0860

Image of WWII  BRITISH ARMY WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL UNIT TYPE  E

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WWII BRITISH ARMY WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL UNIT TYPE E

Remote Control Unit 'E' Mk2.
Used in conjunction with the Wireless Set No19
See Item A0088 and A0871

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A0870

Image of WW1 MARTINS LTD TRENCH PHONE

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WW1 MARTINS LTD TRENCH PHONE

Just one example of many Trench Phones used during WW1 type Telephone Set D Mark III. This one made by Martins Ltd of Birmingham.

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A1001

Image of WW1 TELEPHONE No 110 OR TRENCH PHONE

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WW1 TELEPHONE No 110 OR TRENCH PHONE

Used by the British Army along with many other designs during WW1.
Made by British Post Office Telephones.

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A0034

Image of WD ACCUMULATOR 6 VOLT, 1951

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WD ACCUMULATOR 6 VOLT, 1951

Military battery box providing 6volts,with recharging capability.

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A0801

Image of WWII  US ARMY FIELD TELEPHONE (SWITCHBOARD) EXCHANGE BD72

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WWII US ARMY FIELD TELEPHONE (SWITCHBOARD) EXCHANGE BD72

Made in the USA in 1943 and shipped to Russia .
Returned to America in the 1950's for refurbishment, and shipped back to Russia.
Stored there until the year 2000, and then sold to a dealer.
In new unused condition.

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A0057

Image of WWII THROAT MICROPHONE No2 MK2

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WWII THROAT MICROPHONE No2 MK2

Ideal in noisy situations such as aircraft.
Can be a little distorted but still audible.

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A0320

Image of WWII THROAT MICROPHONE T-30-R

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WWII THROAT MICROPHONE T-30-R

Throat microphones are usually worn in noisy environments such as aircraft, and although slightly distorted, can still be intelligible.

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A0321

Image of WW1 CRYSTAL RECEIVER MODEL Tb, 1917

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WW1 CRYSTAL RECEIVER MODEL Tb, 1917

Crystal Receiver used in aircraft during World War One.
Mounting was a wooden box, with the unit suspended on two rubber bands.
Morse only was received on this unit.
Used during the same period as Item A0137 the Sterling Spark Transmitter.

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A0772

Image of WW1 STERLING SPARK TRANSMITTER

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WW1 STERLING SPARK TRANSMITTER

Transmitter used by aircraft for 'spotting' the fall of artillery shells, the operator could tell the gunners if they were on target.
The transmitter and Morse key were totally enclosed lest a spark ignite petrol vapour in the cockpit.
The transmitters were developed by the Royal Naval Air Service and the makers were The Sterling Telephone Company. On the top of the unit should be an ammeter, unfortunately this item is missing, the museum is currently searching for this item.

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A0137

Image of WWII  BC 453 B SIGNAL CORPS RECEIVER

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WWII BC 453 B SIGNAL CORPS RECEIVER

Part of a group of equipment known as 'Command' fitted in aircraft for general crew use.
Although the radio operator and pilot could use the communication equipment on board, the general crew could not, but they were allowed to to use 'Command' Equipment.
This particular portion of the system ( SCR1305A ) , was a beacon receiver for tracking a fixed course by following a beam from a distant transmitter, (similar to 'get you home' beams).
Other equipment of similar size and weight would be Transmitters and Receivers for R/T communication ( voice ) . The aircraft's normal Transceiver would be CW ( Morse ). Frequency 190kcs to 550 kcs

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A0174

Image of WWII SIGNAL CORPS BALLOON AERIAL, 1943

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WWII SIGNAL CORPS BALLOON AERIAL, 1943

Second World War Aerial Balloon in tin container. Once opened by a Sardine key, the balloon was filled with Hydrogen and the aerial wire attached.

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A0725

Image of WWII  ROC (ROYAL OBSERVER CORPS) OBSERVATION TELEPHONE

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WWII ROC (ROYAL OBSERVER CORPS) OBSERVATION TELEPHONE

Used by searchlight crews and observation posts during WW2.
The ROC from 1925 were organised by the RAF with trained professional officers and civilian volunteers for the purpose of observing incoming enemy aircraft.
The Corps closed in 1996.

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A0040

Image of WW1 GERMAN TRENCH PHONE, 1905

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WW1 GERMAN TRENCH PHONE, 1905

German field telephone completely self contained needing only a power source.

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A0072

Image of BC611C  HANDIE TALKIE TRANSCEIVER, 1952

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BC611C HANDIE TALKIE TRANSCEIVER, 1952

Operating on A.M. 3885khz, Range 100ft to 1 mile using 5 valves. Known as the 'Handy Talkie' This small hand held radio was used for communications at very close range, with a max range of about one mile in ideal conditions.
It is often incorrectly named the walkie-talkie.
The French army used a post-war produced version almost identical to the WWII model.
A special webbing padded case was made for this item.

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A0157

Image of WWII NATIONAL COMPANY R106 HRO RECEIVER, 1934

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WWII NATIONAL COMPANY R106 HRO RECEIVER, 1934

National HRO receiver, circa 1938.
The HRO receiver was first announced in QST magazine in October 1934 and shipped in March 1935, incorporating many design features requested by the fledgling airline industry that were also attractive to the amateur radio community.
The HRO found widespread use during World War II as the preferred receiver of various Allied monitoring services, including Y-Service stations associated with the code-breaking group at Bletchley Park (Station X) in England. An estimated 1,000 standard HROs were initially purchased by Great Britain, and approximately 10,000 total saw use by the British in intercept operation, diplomatic communications, aboard ships and at shore stations as well as for clandestine use.

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A1030

Image of WWII  HRO RECEIVER RACK MOUNTING VERSION

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WWII HRO RECEIVER RACK MOUNTING VERSION

The title HRO is said to have originated as a result of the initial title HOR standing for 'Ham Operators Radio' this was said to be not acceptable due to it's other interpretations, so the letters were changed to HRO.
Another story relates to the fact that it was required to be designed and developed in a very short time, and was given the nickname 'Hell of a rush' again HOR presented the same problem.
Which story is true is debatable. However the set itself with its interchangeable tuning coil sets and its superb tuning mechanism made it one of the most sort after sets by radio amateurs after the war.

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A0172

Image of WWII  US SIGNAL CORPS LOUD SPEAKER LS3

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WWII US SIGNAL CORPS LOUD SPEAKER LS3

Speaker used with military communication equipment. Currently plugged into a HRO receiver in the Museum. However the HRO receivers we have require a 7000 ohm impedance unit.

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A0529

Image of WW1  ERICSSON FIELD TELEPHONE, 1908

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WW1 ERICSSON FIELD TELEPHONE, 1908

Used in WW1 as trench phone D Mk 1

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A0028

Image of WWII  US FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE EE-8-A

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WWII US FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE EE-8-A

Type EE-8-A with canvas cover used by the American Army during WW2. Calling is by Magneto hand cranked Generator and the unit can be used with switchboard BD72 Item A0057.

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A0029

Image of B2 SPY SET. OWNED BY MAJOR JOHN BROWN.

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B2 SPY SET. OWNED BY MAJOR JOHN BROWN.

The B2 or Type 3 Mk2 spy set was developed by Major John Brown (then Captain) in 1942 and replaced an earlier version, the A Mk 3.

With at least 60ft. of Aerial and a good earth a range of 1000 miles was achievable. One of the features was the power supply, which could operate from 120 or 240 volt mains or a 6 volt car battery. It could be dropped by air in watertight cases (often concealed in rivers or lakes) or worn as a backpack.

This is John Brown's most famous radio set; our example was owned by John Brown himself.

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A0154

Image of WWII PARACHUTE BOXES FOR TYPE 3 Mk 2 B2 SPY SET

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WWII PARACHUTE BOXES FOR TYPE 3 Mk 2 B2 SPY SET

Parachute boxes for the Spy Transceiver Type 3 Mk2 or B2 Item A0154.
The sets were dropped from aircraft in these boxes, they are completely waterproof and could be sunk in rivers for retrieval later.

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A0732

Image of WWII SIGNAL CORPS AERIAL WIRE

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WWII SIGNAL CORPS AERIAL WIRE

Aerial wire for use with portable Transceivers.
See The John Brown Spy Set Item A0154

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A0565

Image of WWII BRITISH WIRELESS SET 88, 1946

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WWII BRITISH WIRELESS SET 88, 1946

Designed as a tropicalised man pack set for short range communications for the infantry. Range 1 to 2 miles using standard 4ft rod 38 to 42 Mghz using FM only. Wireless Set No. 88 was a man pack VHF-FM transceiver developed in about 1947 as a replacement for the No. 38 Set. It was the first British developed tactical VHF-FM man pack set.
The No. 88 Set could work to Wireless Set No. 31 and four channels marked A to D on its tuning dial correspond with those on Wireless Set No. 88 Type A. It was principally used for short range infantry communications.
The No. 88 set was carried in a pouch similar to a Bren gun ammunition pouch, which made carrying and operation inconspicuous. The battery is carried separately in a similar pouch.
Two versions were made of this set: Type A for infantry Company-Platoon use and Type B for infantry Mortar-Platoon use. Apart from the difference in frequencies and indication plate, they are distinguishable by their colours. Type A has an olive drab top panel and case, whilst Type B has a black top.
Wireless Set No. 88 AFV was developed for fitting in tanks and other vehicles along with Wireless Set No. 19 for the purpose of communicating with infantry personnel equipped with Wireless Sets No. 88 Type A.
The set comprised a slightly modified standard No. 88 Set Type A, powered from 12V DC by a separate Power Supply And LF Amplifier Unit No. 2. The latter also incorporated AF amplifiers raising the AF output of the No. 88 Set and vehicle harness microphones to a suitable level.

Frequency range 38.01-42.15MHz
Four crystal controlled channels
Two versions: Type A and Type B, differing in frequency
RF output 0.25W
FM R/T only
Range up to 2 miles
HT and LT is obtained from a combined dry battery
Set is lightweight and self contained
Case is tropicalised and immersion proof

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A0155

Image of WWII  TANNOY  MICROPHONE

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WWII TANNOY MICROPHONE

Tannoy is a registered trade mark and is a Syllabic abbreviation of Tantulum Alloy, used in a form of Electrolytic rectifiers developed by the company, which when formed in London was called in 1926 'Tulsemere Manufacturing Company.'
This product has not been made since just after WW2 and was used in Public Address systems as well as military communications.
Being extremely robust it will continue to work after much abuse, making it ideal for the Army or Navy in rough conditions.

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A0316

Image of WWII No 3 HAND MICROPHONE

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WWII No 3 HAND MICROPHONE

Microphone for use with a variety of Transceivers during and after World War Two.

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A0315

Image of WWII ALDIS SIGNAL LAMP ADMIRALTY PATTERN

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WWII ALDIS SIGNAL LAMP ADMIRALTY PATTERN

Used as a lamp signal source for Morse code by the Navy during WW2.
This one was last used in 1997.
Also used by Airport Control Towers using colour signals for stop and clearance.

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A0388

Image of WWII  MANCE MILITARY HELIOGRAPH 5INCH MK 5

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WWII MANCE MILITARY HELIOGRAPH 5INCH MK 5

Sir Henry Christopher Mance (18401926), of British Army Signal Corps, developed the first apparatus while stationed at Karachi, Bombay.
Used for signalling by reflecting the suns ray's, a second mirror is supplied for when the sun is behind the sender. This model has not changed since before the Boer War. The whole unit can be packed into the leather case with the legs strapped to the side. A Heliograph (from the Greek Helios meaning "sun"), is a wireless solar telegraph that signals using Morse code flashes of sunlight reflected by a mirror.
The flashes are produced by momentarily pivoting the mirror, or by interrupting the beam with a shutter. The Heliograph was a simple but highly effective instrument for instantaneous optical communication over 50 km or more in the late 19th and early 20th century.
Its major uses were military, survey and forest protection work. Heliograph's were standard issue in the British and Australian armies until the 1960s, and were used by the Pakistani army as late as 1975.

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A0195

Image of WW1 SIGNAL LAMP LONG RANGE AND HELIOS TRIPOD

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WW1 SIGNAL LAMP LONG RANGE AND HELIOS TRIPOD

Signal Lamp used by the Military for Daylight or Night Morse communications. It is supplied complete with Tripod (Normally used with Heliograph Item A0195) Single spike if not used with tripod Night Variable aperture disc and colour filters. The Morse key is stowed inside the lid and has two settings, one via a resistance for new batteries to preserve the bulb, a box of spare bulbs and accessories is also provided.

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A1450

Image of WWII SIGNAL LAMP

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WWII SIGNAL LAMP

Morse signalling lamp with a very narrow beam and a Morse key unit which can be mounted on a Helios tripod, like Item A1450, or staked in the ground.
For night time use filters are provided, also an aperture plate to reduce the light output.
The first time this model was produced was during the fist World War designed by George Lucas.

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A0373

Image of WW1 SPARE LAMPS FOR LAMP SIGNALLING, 1918

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WW1 SPARE LAMPS FOR LAMP SIGNALLING, 1918

Spare lamps for War Department Lamp Signalling, see item NoA0373.

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A0329

Image of WW1 FULLERPHONE MK3 FIELD TELEPHONE

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WW1 FULLERPHONE MK3 FIELD TELEPHONE

Captain Fuller later Colonel, invented this form of military field telephone. Because of the internal buzzer unit (chopper) it could transmit Morse via only one wire, using the ground as the other connection. There was a Mk1 and Mk2 version also used during WW1, this unit is dated 1920.

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A0070

Image of WWII FIELD TELEPHONE SET D MKV

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WWII FIELD TELEPHONE SET D MKV

Used during WW2 and based on Colonel Fullers designs for field telephones.
Later to be replaced by many more similar styles up to type 'J'

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A0004

Image of SIEMENS SIZE 'S' BATTERY, 1930's

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SIEMENS SIZE 'S' BATTERY, 1930's

Small dry cell 1.5 volts Used in WD equipment such as Item A0004 during WW2

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A0269

Image of WWII  FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE 'F' Mk2

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WWII FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE 'F' Mk2

Bakelite version of field telephone type 'F' in wooden box. Made by the Telephone Manufacturing Company.

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A0051

Image of  FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE 'F' HIGH POWER, 1944

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FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE 'F' HIGH POWER, 1944

Amplified version of Field Telephone Type 'F' using a valve stage to amplify the strength of the signal. In the second picture can be seen the amplifier at the rear, with one part missing, suspected to be the relay. We are currently searching for the missing section.

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A1097

Image of WWII FULLERPHONE MK 4 FIELD TELEPHONE, 1943

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WWII FULLERPHONE MK 4 FIELD TELEPHONE, 1943

The improved version of the Mk3 although no speech was possible, Morse was heard only via the headset.

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A0071

Image of WWII MILITARY  FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE

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WWII MILITARY FIELD TELEPHONE TYPE "J"

One of a range of field telephones made during the second world war and used by the Army.

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A0850

Image of WWII CANADIAN WIRELESS No 58*, 1944

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WWII CANADIAN WIRELESS No 58*, 1944

Made by the Canadians to replace the W.S. 18 but not officially adopted by the British.
The Mk 1 Star, replaced the earlier Mk1 with minor differences, the main one, being it had round corners instead of square.
Some changes were also made to the control panel.

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A0085

Image of WWII GERMAN FIELD TELEPHONE, 1941

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WWII GERMAN FIELD TELEPHONE, 1941

Common German field telephone of WW2

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A0005

Image of WWII WIRELESS SET No.17 Mk1

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WWII WIRELESS SET No.17 Mk1

A small portable ground station for communication between searchlight section headquarters and anti-aircraft batteries. It replaced signal lamps. It was designed by Stanley Lewer in 1939 for Searchlight Territorial units during the war.

This unit is original apart from the repainted front panel which was badly corroded, but the colour is the same. Serial No. 4617 one of the first series.

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A0894

Image of WWII WIRELESS SET No 17 MK 2, 1939

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WWII WIRELESS SET No 17 MK 2, 1939

Mk2 Version of item A0894 .
A small portable ground station for communication between searchlight section headquarters and 'AA' batteries.
It replaced signal lamps. Designed by Stanley Lewer in 1939 for Searchlight Territorial units during the war.
It was not fully adopted by the War Office.

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A0980

Image of WWII WIRELESS SET No18. Mk 3, 1940's

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WWII WIRELESS SET No18. Mk 3, 1940's

A man pack portable set for short range communications, carried by one man and operated by a second. First produced in 1940 by Pye Telecommunications Ltd.

Range with 11 foot rod aerial was over 5 miles using speech; 10 miles using CW (Morse).

The front panels are normally grey, black panels were usually for special operations use.

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A0791

Image of WWII WIRELESS SET NO.19

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WWII WIRELESS SET NO.19

This model was made in the USA by the ZENITH Corp. and has Russian and English markings on the face plate. These sets were sent to Russia under the 'lend Lease' Program of WW2. As a result many have turned up in surplus stores since then.

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A0088, A0089, A0090

Image of WWII SPARE VALVE KITS  FOR WIRELESS SET 19

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WWII SPARE VALVE KITS FOR WIRELESS SET 19

Valve kits for Item A0088.

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A0092

Image of WWII HYDROMETER SECONDARY CELL PORTABLE No 1 FOR WIRELESS SET No 19, 1940's

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WWII HYDROMETER SECONDARY CELL PORTABLE No 1 FOR WIRELESS SET No 19, 1940's

Hydrometers are used for the measurement of specific gravity.The unit can also approximate the charge of a secondary cell (chargeable type) that has a liquid electrolyte by, in this case, the floating or sinking of the plastic balls in the barrel of the tube, (the liquid is sucked up from the battery by depressing the bulb and releasing).
If all balls float the battery is fully charged.

If the white ball sinks three quarter charge.
Green ball sinks half charge.
Red ball sinks quarter charge or less.

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A0322

Image of WWII WIRELESS SET No 38 MK2, 1941

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WWII WIRELESS SET No 38 MK2, 1941

Using a separate battery pack this radio could be carried by one man. Not the first true man pack; the WS No13 man pack in 1937 pre-dated it but was not so successful. It was designed by Murphy Radio.

Range is half a mile with a 4 foot rod aerial, 2 miles using a 12 foot rod. It was supplied with headset and throat microphone.

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A0156

Image of WWII WIRELESS SET No 46, 1941

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WWII WIRELESS SET No 46, 1941

This wireless set was developed for Combined Operation Command to provide radio communication under difficult conditions, such as sea landing operations. Manufactured by E.K.COLE (ECKO) and used during D-DAY. This set was advanced for its time.

Range 8 miles, batteries are carried in a separate pack.

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A0794

Image of WWII R1116A RECEIVER

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WWII R1116A RECEIVER

Used in the Fairy Swordfish Aircraft, they were also fitted in the Sunderland Flying Boat and other aircraft between the two world wars. Its companion was the R1115 transmitter.

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A1029

Image of WWII  1155 RECEIVER, 1155

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WWII 1155 RECEIVER, 1155

Made for the Lancaster bomber, but used in other large aircraft and also as a ground station The R1155 is an English LF and HF super heterodyne receiver covering from 75kHz to 18.5mHz in 5 bands, with D/F (Direction Finding) and homing functions.
This receiver started development in 1939 by the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co and was called the AD.87B/8882B to replace the pre-war T1083 and R1082.
The R.A.F. designation was the R1155 and the corresponding transmitter was the T1154, the first units being installed in June 1940. These were still used into the 1950s. Several companies manufactured them, including Marconi, Ekco, Plessy, Philips, and the Gramophone Co. (EMI).
They were fitted to many aircraft like the Avro Lancaster and the deHavilland Mosquito. They were imported into Australia after the War to be used in Lincoln bombers. Although they were used mainly in aircraft, later in the war they were fitted to small boats (N suffix), and also to vehicles (115, 115B, 130, 131).
The receiver has 10 valves of which 3 are for the D/F and one is a Tuning Indicator (magic eye).
There are 6 used for the super heterodyne receiver. The receiver has an RF stage, a mixer/oscillator, two IF stages, an AVC and BFO stage, a detector, an audio amplifier, and a magic eye tuning indicator. The D/F circuitry has two valves as aerial switching and multi vibrator, and a meter switch.
It can have 3 aerials, a fixed wire type, a trailing aerial, and a D/F loop. It has 11 controls of which 5 are for D/F only.

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A0165

Image of WWII 1154N TRANSMITTER

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WWII 1154N TRANSMITTER

Similar to sets used in the Avro Lancaster and other large aircraft during WW2.
The variant 'N' was originally designed for RAF Coastal Command) for general-purpose airborne use, and the R1154N (steel) for all other general use, except in bomber aircraft.

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A0164

Image of WWII  RAF CARBON TYPE  DESK MICROPHONE No 3

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WWII RAF CARBON TYPE DESK MICROPHONE No 3

Desk Microphone No3 made from the Post Office pillar phone.
By WW2 the old Candlestick (Pillar Phone) was becoming obsolete being replaced by the 200 series Pyramid type, to help the War effort the British Post Office were able to find many of the old phones for conversion.
The Desk microphone No3 was used with the 1154 Transmitter when operating as a ground station Item A0164.

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A0742

Image of WWII MORSE KEY FOR TRANSMITTER, 1154

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WWII MORSE KEY FOR TRANSMITTER, 1154

Morse Key as used with the 1154 Transmitter. See Item No A0164
Sometimes called a ''Bathtub'' key.

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A0311

Image of MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS LAND ROVER 90  (external view), 1986

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MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS LAND ROVER 90 (external view), 1986

In service mainly in Northern Ireland during the 1980's, fitted with a Clansman 353, 320 and 351 Manpack VHF Radios also Larkspur C12 and C45 Transceivers.

Military reg. number 53KG58, yellow flag indicates disabled vehicle.

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Image of MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS LAND ROVER 90 (internal view), 1986

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MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS LAND ROVER 90 (internal view), 1986

The vehicle is fitted with four Wireless sets plus one Manpack. The combination is to show a variety of systems that could have been used in the Land Rover range of vehicles, not all at the same time of course. The sets are -

C12 - (middle left on table) Made by PYE (forerunner to the Larkspur Range). Basically similar to the WS19 but does not include the B set, it has the same case, weight and dimensions but a wider frequency range, covering 1.6 Mhz to 10 Mhz AM, voice or CW (Morse). 5 Watts voice 8 Watts CW.

C45 - (middle right on table) Developed around 1955 working VHF Frequencies, FM from 23 Mhz to 38 Mhz, identical to the C42 which worked 60 Mhz to 36 Mhz also FM, only 15 Watts.

R351 - (middle front) Made by Racal and introduced around 1985. The R351 can be mounted in vehicle bracket ( top left ) or used as a manpack. Some of these units are still in use today (2005). Frequency range 30 to 70 Mhz FM only, power 4 watts, or 20 watts using clip on amplifier 352 as shown.

R353 - (far left) Made by Marconi or Racal, Vehicle unit same frequencies and modes of operation as the R351 but power up to 50 watts from the vehicle antennae, the large boxes on the wings are aerial tuning units for Racal FM sets.

R320 - (top left) Made by Plessey. A manpack unit mounted in a vehicle frame this set was designed to communicate with base stations or each other using AM, CW or upper sideband modes rather than FM. Frequency range 2 to 30 Mhz.

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