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The Great War and WWII [1850-1980]

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Home:  Wireless & TV

Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.


Image of HMV MODEL 1121 WIRELESS, 1950's

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HMV MODEL 1121 WIRELESS, 1950's

Made after 1950 with four bands, two short wave, Long and Medium, switchable tone control and four separate glass scales one for each band. Mains only operation, and requiring an external Aerial and Earth connection. Price new not known.

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A1460

Image of WW2 HRO MARCONI WORKERS WIRELESS (RADIO), 1940's

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WW2 HRO MARCONI WORKERS WIRELESS (RADIO), 1940's

Made during WW2 for factory workers possibly at Chelmsford and assembled from a National HRO chassis. The tuning gearbox and chassis is black indicating an early HRO, also the crystal section and I.F. coils are original. Instead of a plug in coil section a permanent set of coils has been installed behind a blank panel, a wave change switch is included for Long and Medium wave only. The set might have been made by an employee of Marconi as there is no Manufacturers mark although the set is professionally made, only a large 'M' across the speaker. It was donated to the Museum with verbal provenance relating to its origin. No other information is known.

Donated by Marconi Museum

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A1366

Image of ROBERTS R66 MAINS BATTERY VALVE PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

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ROBERTS R66 MAINS BATTERY VALVE PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

Employing a Ferrite rod internal aerial the R66 is a 2 band 4 valve portable designed to operate from All Dry batteries or AC mains. Wavebands covered are 182-580 Meters and 900-2000 Metres. In April 1956 it cost £13-19-6d Batteries and Purchase Tax Extra.

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A1340

Image of EVER READY SKY KING PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

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EVER READY SKY KING PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1956

The Sky Queen was for the Ladies, the Sky King for the gent's. Medium and Long wave only. Battery: Ever Ready B136 (combined HT 90v & LT 1.5v). Original price: £10 - plus taxes and batteries

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A1339

Image of EVER READY SKY BARONET PORTABLE RADIO, 1958

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EVER READY SKY BARONET PORTABLE RADIO, 1958

Ever Ready made portable wireless's until 1968 when they reverted to making batteries only, this model was made in 1958. Original price £14 7s 3d (included batteries and taxes) The Sky Baronet followed the Sky Princess and has a similar lid to the case but employed a Printed circuit chassis, instead of a hand wired metal type.

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A1338

Image of EVER READY SKY PRINCESS PORTABLE RADIO, 1956

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EVER READY SKY PRINCESS PORTABLE RADIO, 1956

Ever Ready made portable wireless's until 1968 when they reverted to making batteries only, this model was made in July 1956. Cost £10-10s Batteries and Purchase Tax extra. A 2 band All Dry battery portable 4 valves, the wavebands are 192-550 Metres and 1040-1765 metres.

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A1337

Image of PHILCO TORCH RADIO MODEL 3782, 1956

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PHILCO TORCH RADIO MODEL 3782, 1956

Philco portable mains battery valve Radio of 1956, with a torch embedded in the tuning knob on the side. The sales literature states ''Powerful built in torch. 3 Bands Long Medium and Maritime. Choice of four colours. AC/DC Mains operation. Cost in 1956 18 Gns Tax Paid''. Uses four miniature valves, DK92, DF91, DAF91, DL94.

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A1334

Image of WIRELESS LICENCE, 1930

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WIRELESS LICENCE, 1930

The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on 18 October 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom and licensed by the British General Post Office.

On 31 December 1926, the company was dissolved and its assets were transferred to the non-commercial and Crown Chartered British Broadcasting Corporation.

The BBC had to be paid for by public subscription ie listeners were required an annual licence.
All manufactures were legally bound to obtain a licence from the Post Master General, before producing their Wireless Sets.

The licence shown was issued to Thomas George Morris Asquith 93 Vale of Heath Road, Port Tenarth, on the 15 of January 1930, Cost 10 Shillings.

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A0149

Image of HMV COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE, 1937

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HMV COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE, 1937

Hallmarked silver plaque given to 'The Totland Bay Garage' in 1937 to:

"Commemorate your association with "His Masters Voice" during Coronation Year".

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A1046

Image of BREADBOARD TYPE PORTABLE WIRELESS SET BCM/CWC, 1920's

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BREADBOARD TYPE PORTABLE WIRELESS SET BCM/CWC, 1920's

Portable receiver of unknown make marked BCM/CWC, built on a wooden board and hand wired known as breadboard construction, although portable it required three batteries HT, LT, and Grid Bias, with a good aerial and earth.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1182

Image of 'VULCAN' 2 VALVE BREADBOARD  WIRELESS SET, 1925

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'VULCAN' 2 VALVE BREADBOARD WIRELESS SET, 1925

Breadboard wireless with 2 valves, it requires headphones or High Impedance speaker for listening and three batteries, it would also require at least one hundred feet of aerial and a good earth.

Made by J.G.Graves,Hallamgate Works, Crookes Rd, Sheffield ,South Yorkshire, in 1925. The radio was called the 'VULCAN' and came complete
with 90volt HT battery, 2volt accumulator, Grid Bias battery, Loudspeaker, Aerial cable with insulators,rope halyard and pulley, and lead-in tube (all missing) and connecting leads, all for £7-17-6d

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1199

Image of CLYNE RADIO SUPERIOR 4  WIRELESS SET, 1966

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CLYNE RADIO SUPERIOR 4 WIRELESS SET, 1966

Supplied as a kit, complete with instruction book and original receipt.
Cost £6-9s-6d PT 2s-6d

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A0152

Image of BRANDSET 2 CANADIAN BRANDS WIRELESS, 1924

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BRANDSET 2 CANADIAN BRANDS WIRELESS, 1924

Two valve TRF receiver made by the Brandes Corporation in Canada 1924, similar sets were made in Slough England, and a later model the 3A was launched around 1929 with 3 valves.
The set requires 3 Batteries and listening is done via headphones of which the Brandes version are shown, the headband is missing.
No more is known about these sets.

Nortel Collection

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A1321

Image of KOLSTER-BRANDS 'BLACK CAT' RECEIVER, 1932

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KOLSTER-BRANDS 'BLACK CAT' RECEIVER, 1932

Only 40,000 "Black Cat" wireless sets were made and were given away free in exchange for coupons from packets of cigarettes in 1930.

The cigarettes in question were "Best Dark Virginia", and in order to qualify for a free radio, it was necessary to spend over £12 which would have purchased 500 packets of ten.

At that time the price of receivers was very high, because of a protection scheme run by a cartel of British manufacturers.
The valves that were used had to be British, and the royalties had to be paid to the Marconi Company and the BBC.

The sale of cheap foreign imports was banned but giving them away "free" wasn't, so this loophole was exploited in order to sell more cigarettes.

The receivers were made by KB but cheap imported valves were supplied by the tobacco company.

The KB shown here is one of the earliest Bakelite-cased models and is an extremely neat design using a TRF circuit around a couple of 2-volt valves. The lid which carries the loudspeaker hinges up to reveal the tuning and reaction controls.
Unfortunately although the receiver is very small, the batteries were standard and had to be employed externally to the set.
This changed the neat receiver into a bit of a messy affair with its trailing leads and collection of batteries.

Nortel Collection

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A1315

Image of KLOSTER BRANDS (TOASTER RADIO) FB10, 1950's

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KLOSTER BRANDS (TOASTER RADIO) FB10, 1950's

Kloster Brands FB10, was known as The Toaster Radio, in September 1950 it cost £8.17s.1d, it was usually kept in the kitchen and looked just like a toaster.

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A0804

Image of MARCONI 706 5 INCH TV/WIRELESS, 1939

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MARCONI 706 5 INCH TV/WIRELESS, 1939

Although appearing complete and to show how the TV would look in 1939, the tube is a later radar type and the scan coils are missing. This was one of Marconi's first Televisions.

John Ambrose collection

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A0846

Image of PYE B18T TELEVISION, 1948

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PYE B18T TELEVISION, 1948

The first AC/DC Television single band only.
In January 1949 this TV would have cost 49 Guineas.

John Ambrose collection

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A0847

Image of PYE LV30C TELEVISION, 1950

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PYE LV30C TELEVISION, 1950

The Pye LV30C single channel Television (BBC only) , first sold in June 1950 for £38.11s.8d PT extra.

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A0375

Image of BUSH TV12A TELEVISION, 1949

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BUSH TV12A TELEVISION, 1949

This was the first Television set made with a bakelite case, it has a 9 inch screen. Magnifiers could be puchased that were filled with liquid, these were strapped to the front of the TV to magnify the size of the picture. In April 1949 the TV12 cost £41.3s.1d PT extra.

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A0374

Image of SINCLAIR MICROVISION TV MODEL TV1B, 1978

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SINCLAIR MICROVISION TV MODEL TV1B, 1978

The Microvision TV1B was launched in the autumn of 1978, it was 4 inch x 6 inch and 1.5 inch high. Its predecessor the TV1A sold for around £230.00, it weighed 26 oz; this made it ounce for ounce more expensive than Silver. The picture could be viewed from a foot away. Functioning on VHF and UHF bands, it was the world’s first multi-standard receiver.

Donated by Allen Robert

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A1023

Image of TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

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TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

Small Television screen magnifier. This was filled with liquid and strapped onto the television to magnify the size of the picture, it did however create some distortion. Many visitors to the museum remember using one of these.

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A0378

Image of TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

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TELEVISION MAGNIFIER, 1940's

A small Television screen magnifier, this one is tinted pink. It was filled with liquid and strapped onto the television to magnify the size of the picture, this would cause some distortion.

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A0377

Image of BUSH DAC90, 1947

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BUSH DAC90, 1947

The DAC 90 cost £11 gns in July 1946 and was replaced by the DAC 90A in Feb 1950.

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A0148

Image of BUSH DAC90A, 1950

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BUSH DAC90A, 1950

In Feb 1950 the DAC90A Cost £12. 1s 8d purchase tax extra. It replaced the DAC90.
This was one of the most popular sets ever made, and is still in use today.
They are often seen at fairs, the Bakelite polishes up beautifully.

Donated by Ernest Richards

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A1010

Image of BUSH DAC91, 1947

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BUSH DAC91, 1947

This is the version that superceded the DAC 90,normally an expanded metal grille is fitted. Released May 1947 Price £17. 17. 03d including Purchase tax. Same as the DAC90 but without the internal frame Arial, (Required an external Arial ) and it has a cream plastic speaker grill.

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A1115

Image of BUSH VHF 90 WIRELESS, 1956

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BUSH VHF 90 WIRELESS, 1956

The Bush VHF 90 was made in 1956, This unit was given to a Mrs Allner by the British Wireless for the Blind Fund. It has only Medium Wave and VHF FM Bands, and it cost in July 1956 £16.12s.08d Purchase tax extra. The set has an internal aerial for VHF and AM,and a possible external VHF connection. These sets were AC/DC meaning, there is no transformer inside, therefore no isolation from the mains, such sets are not now made for this reason, it also has an aluminium chassis making it lighter but more expensive, most chassis for sets of this type are made of steel. For more information see trader Sheet 1293.

Donated by Mr Edward Allner

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A1403

Image of DAVENSET BATTERY CHARGER, 1930's

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DAVENSET BATTERY CHARGER, 1930's

Usually found in Garages or Cycle shops for charging Wireless Accumulators. Supplying 20 Volts, it can charge 10 X Accumulators at one time. Davenset Chargers are still made today.
All the museum trutees can remember their parents taking an Accumulator to be re-charged.

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A0115

Image of BTH CRYSTAL SET AND BBC HEADPHONES, 1920's

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BTH CRYSTAL SET AND BBC HEADPHONES, 1920's

This is the BTH Type 'C' Form 'A' twin detector crystal set manufactured by British Thomson Houston Ltd. in 1924. It bears the BBC/Post Master General stamp marked with the GPO Reg. No. 106.* The lid carries the instructions for use. The date of manufacture is printed in the lower left corner of the instruction card. This crystal set was manufactured by BTH from 1922 through to 1925.
*All manufactures were legally bound to obtain a licence from the Post Master General, before producing their Wireless Sets.

The set is housed in a walnut cabinet and features variometer tuning, twin cats whisker detectors and selectable aerial coupling.

A variometer is a rotary variable inductance typically used for aerial tuning

Nortel Collection

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A1318

Image of S G BROWN AMPLIFIER, 1924

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S G BROWN AMPLIFIER, 1924

Known as the 'Brown Microphone Amplifier' it was initially designed to amplify telephone signals,although called a microphone amplifier it is not used with a microphone, this refers to the working mechanism which is purely mechanicle. In the 1920's a license was required for valve equipment, this unit cost half the fee. A wireless set or crystal receiver could be connected to these units and enough power could be produced to enhance the sound considerably. With a six volt battery to power the unit it would consume less power than an equivelent two valve system. In 1924 this model for valve sets cost £5.5s.0d.

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A0312

Image of OSRAM MUSIC MAGNET WIRELESS, 1929

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OSRAM MUSIC MAGNET WIRELESS, 1929

Sold as a kit using the trade name GECophone in 1929, it has a metal chssis and front panel with oak end panels and lift up lid. It is a battery set and has 3 valves. There are two waveband coils six condensors, an L.F. transformer and little else. Requiring headphones aerial and earth.

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A0159

Image of BREAD BOARD 6 VALVE RECEIVER, 1930's

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BREAD BOARD 6 VALVE RECEIVER, 1930's

Many small companies sprung up in the 1920's making wireless sets for sale. These unfortunately soon suffered from the large companies going into mass production and flooding the market. This receiver has six valves four of which are RF amplifiers, Long Medium and Short wave making it ambitious, as Superhetrodynes had not yet become widely available,so much amplification must have produced a lot of unwanted noise. A label on the set says Made by J.Karslake & Son 264 High street, opposite the Post Office. Exeter 2510.
The coils inside are Wearite types, carefully matched for three stages of a TRF or "straight" receiver
The cans are copper and the coils plug into standard B4 valve sockets.
The covers were vital for a stable receiver so that there was no unwanted coupling between the amplifying stages.

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A0144

Image of FRAME AERIAL FOR LONG AND MEDIUM WAVE, 1930's

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FRAME AERIAL FOR LONG AND MEDIUM WAVE, 1930's

Many houses in built up areas did not have gardens large enough to acommodate an aerial, (flats had no gardens) so an aerial for a receiver was a problem. The frame aerial provided some help, mounted on the top of the set, it could provide some signal strength, but not as good as an outdoor aerial.

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A0145

Image of GECOPHONE BC 3050 RECEIVER, 1920's

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GECOPHONE BC 3050 RECEIVER, 1920's

The item shown is a single valve receiver made by GEC using a HE3 Valve.

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A0143

Image of IVELEK CRYSTAL SET, 1950's

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IVELEK CRYSTAL SET, 1950's

Advertized in Exchange and Mart and other periodicals, and aimed at young enthusiasts. Museum staff remember listening to radio Luxemburg on these sets in the 50's and 60'S.
Radio Luxembourg was a Long Wave commercial radio station that began broadcasting from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in 1933.

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A0142

Image of VIDOR 'MY LADY ANNE' PORTABLE, 1955

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VIDOR 'MY LADY ANNE' PORTABLE, 1955

Model CN430 Released Date Jan 1955 Cost £14.14s.2d PT Extra

The "My Lady" range of wireless sets became very popular in the 40's and 50's, they came different colours and were very much in demand by the teenagers of the day.

Donated by Kenneth Thompson

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A1034

Image of MARCONI P20B PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1948

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MARCONI P20B PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1948

In December 1948 the P20B cost £11.19s. 6d Plus Purchase Tax

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A1048

Image of HONEYTONE POCKET TRANSISTOR MICRO 7, 1960's

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HONEYTONE POCKET TRANSISTOR MICRO 7, 1960's

Seven Transistor Miniature Pocket Radio, popular in the 1960's.
This really is very small and does fit into a pocket quite easily, compared to the Selecta Portable item A0147 40 years earlier, things had come a long way.

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A0153

Image of EVER READY 'B' or MARCONI PHONE P17B, 1947

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EVER READY 'B' or MARCONI PHONE P17B, 1947

Made by the Marconiphone Company in June 1947, it cost 10 Gns. Also supplied by Ever Ready who had developed a small battery incorporating HT and LT sections specifically for sets like this . This was advertised as a handbag portable wireless.

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A0151

Image of MARCONI 382, 1936

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MARCONI 382, 1936

In September 1936 this wireless set would cost £14.3s.6d
It's big and heavy and built to last, as it has done.

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A0160

Image of SELECTA PORTABLE RECEIVER, 1920's

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SELECTA PORTABLE RECEIVER, 1920's

Large early portable receiver, made in 1929, with four valves and space for HT Battery and LT accumulator.Required a good aerial and earth, a hand written list inside the front doors gives all the control settings for various stations. Tuning was accomplished by plain amplification T.R.F. (Tuned Radio Frequency). In 1929 it cost £33.12s.0d. On the inside back panel is a meter to indicate the charge state of the accumulator. Also available as a suit case portable, and a mains version.

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A0147

Image of BROWNIE NO 2 CRYSTAL SET, 1920's

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BROWNIE NO 2 CRYSTAL SET, 1920's

The number 2 was manufactured by the Brownie Wireless Co. of Great Britain Ltd. The set was available from September 1925 and appears in the 1925/6 Catalogue of the East London Rubber Company. Described as,

"Complete with Semi-Opal Protected Detector, D.L.5 Crystal and "Pallmadium" Cats whisker".

It sold for 10/6 (10 shillings and six pre-decimal pence), or 52.5 pence in today's terms, This price was very competitive, cheap alongside other models of the time, which might have cost in the region of £1 to £5.

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A0785

Image of ASTRAD ORION MICRO POCKET WIRELESS, 1968

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ASTRAD ORION MICRO POCKET WIRELESS, 1968

Made around 1968 and costing £2-10s-00d, this is really tiny and was announced as the world smallest Radio, it has two dials and a crystal earpeice in a plastic case.

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A0943

Image of HMV HYBRID WIRELESS, 1958

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HMV HYBRID WIRELESS, 1958

During the change over to fully transistorized radio, it was easier to use transistors in the output stage,as these were expensive at the time, and still use valves in the high frequency stages, . Using transistors in the output section would have reduced power consumption on batteries.

Donated by Geoff Morgan

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A0872

Image of ETRONIC WIRELESS ETA 521, 1940's

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ETRONIC WIRELESS ETA 521, 1940's

Wood Cased Wireless with rotating needle dial, Mains only, no information has been found out about this item.

Donated by Mr Edwards

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A0924

Image of PROPAGANDA NAZI WIRELESS, 1938

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PROPAGANDA NAZI WIRELESS, 1938

Made during WW2 and tuned to German local frequencies only. Known as 'Die Goebbelsschnauze' ( The Goebbels Gob ) This is the Deutscher Kleinempfänger DKE38 made by G. Schaub in Germany around 1938. It is has 1 valve (plus rectifier) and is a mains TRF receiver housed in a brown bakelite cabinet.

Deutscher Kleinempfänger means 'German small receiver', and the DKE38 is a low cost peoples-set designed for mass production and intended to be introduced into as many German homes as possible, very much like the utility sets that were in UK homes during the Second World War. It was intended for the communication of German propaganda and was manufactured by a number of manufacturers. Like the utility sets,
its design is simple and whilst it would have been adequate for receiving strong local stations, it would have required a good aerial. Many of the parts used in this set are marked with the German eagle.

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A0086

Image of EDDYSTONE EB35  COMMUICATION RECEIVER, 1968

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EDDYSTONE EB35 COMMUICATION RECEIVER, 1968

This is a domestic receiver of 1968 receiving AM and FM with 6 bands, fully transistorised and used by wireless amateurs in the early 1970,s operating from battery or mains. It used Germanium transistors which suffer badly with age, it is unlikely that any of these sets will still work without major repair. the ranges were 88-108 FM, AM 8.5-22MHz, 3.5-8.5MHz, 1.5-3.5MHz, 550-1500Khz, 150-350Khz.

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A0110

Image of EDDYSTONE COMMUNICATION RECEIVER S640, 1947

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EDDYSTONE COMMUNICATION RECEIVER S640, 1947

Desk top Receiver in metal case. Designed as a communication set for wireless amateurs. In 1947 this would have cost £42.00 A 3 band general coverage set HF 1.7-31MHz.Using an EF39 in the RF stage.

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A0967

Image of MURPHY A122M, 1949

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MURPHY A122M, 1949

In January 1949 the Murphy A122M cost £22.00 Purchase Tax extra.
This is beautifully made, it has a slim wooden polished cabinet with linear dial above the loudspeaker fret.

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A0721

Image of BEETHOVEN A415  WIRELESS, 1946

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BEETHOVEN A415 WIRELESS, 1946

In May 1946 Cost 16 Guineas Plus £3.12s.6d Purchase Tax

Donated by Mrs Edwards

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A0923

Image of CAR MASTERADIO, 1948

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CAR MASTERADIO, 1948

This early Car Radio would be slung under the parcel shelf with an external loudspeaker mounted either in a separate box or in the back parcel shelf. The power unit (missing) was bulky and noisy, so it was either under the bonnet or in the boot of the car.

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A0173

Image of VIDOR 'MY LADY MARGARET' BATTERY PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1954

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VIDOR 'MY LADY MARGARET' BATTERY PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1954

In June 1954 this cost £9-2s-10d PT Extra. Battery only version of Accession No1034.The 'My Lady Anne' portable.

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A1131

Image of PHILIPS 660 A/U WIRELESS, 1938

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PHILIPS 660 A/U WIRELESS, 1938

Supplied by Philips Lamp Co in August 1938 . Made by Mullard as Model MAS24.
The wooden cabinet in dark wood stain is in almost perfect condition, with square dial and revolving needle tuning, also push button selection of pre tuned stations, five valves Mains only.

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A1116

Image of CLIMAX FOLDING FRAME AERIAL, 1930's

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CLIMAX FOLDING FRAME AERIAL, 1930's

Frame Aerial used with early Wireless sets when a long Aerial in the garden was not possible.

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A1044

Image of EDISWAN 'COMPACTUM'  WIRELESS WL385, 1920's

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EDISWAN 'COMPACTUM' WIRELESS WL385, 1920's

Ediswan Compactum. Supplied in the 1920's as a kit costing £4 or complete and tested for £11- 11s. Required a HT and LT batteries with a good aerial and earth. Listening was by headphones. The receiver could be worked with any triode valve of the period, dull or bright emitter type.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1181

Image of MARCONIPHONE 256 WIRELESS, 1932

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MARCONIPHONE 256 WIRELESS, 1932

The Marconiphone 256 Superhet had six valves plus rectifier, designed to operate on 200-250 V, 50-100 Cycles. Release date 1932 costing £25.4s

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1155

Image of MULLARD MA3  WIRELESS, 1935

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MULLARD MA3 WIRELESS, 1935

The Mullard MA3 was manufactured in 1935. From the mid 20's till 1938 Mullard was more or less owned by Philips. A fact which was little known by the public, Philips models were labelled and sold as Mullard products, often with different cases. This model is in beautiful condition.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1163

Image of EVER READY SKY COUNTESS PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1958

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EVER READY SKY COUNTESS PORTABLE WIRELESS, 1958

The Ever Ready Sky Countess, is one of the last of the valve portables made by Ever Ready, in 1959 the 'Sky Captain' was made, which marked the switch to non-royal named transistors. The cost in 1958 was £10 which was quite expensive.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1175

Image of MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1920's

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MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1920's

Before permanent magnets were made strong enough and cheap enough, loudspeakers used a coil moving an iron reed which was attached to the diaphragm of the speaker.
Internally a high resistance coil with a permanent magnet through it was used to move an iron reed, attached to a rod on which was placed the paper cone. An Adjustment was provided for maximum efficiency. This method did not require a strong magnet to operate, and the quality was inferior to modern loudspeakers which use the moving coil principal.

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A1136

Image of 'SUNRISE' EXTENSION LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

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'SUNRISE' EXTENSION LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

Original moving iron speaker removed and replaced with moving coil type

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A0891

Image of CELESTION MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1927

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CELESTION MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1927

Before permanent magnets were made strong enough and cheap enough, loudspeakers used a coil moving an iron reed which was attached to the diaphragm of the speaker.
Internally a high resistance coil with a permanent magnet through it, was used to move an iron reed, this was attached to a rod on which was placed the paper cone. An Adjustment was provided for maximum efficiency. This method did not require a strong magnet to operate, and the quality was inferior to modern loudspeakers which use the moving coil principal.

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A0914

Image of 'THE THINKER'  MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

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'THE THINKER' MOVING IRON LOUDSPEAKER, 1940's

Extension Loudspeaker for transferring the wireless to other rooms, with fret cut out to the shape of 'The Thinker' sculpture.

On the the rear view can be seen the adjustment control for the Moving Iron Loudspeaker, it was necessary to occasional correct the clearance of the reed or armature, to keep the unit working properly if this was not done loud volumes would cause thumping or sticking, the unit needed to be able to give good sensitivity for all volume levels.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1168

Image of 'THE STAG' LOUDSPEAKER, 1950's

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'THE STAG' LOUDSPEAKER, 1950's

Extension Loudspeaker for transferring the wireless to other rooms, with fret cut out to the shape of a Stag.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1169

Image of RADIO MAGNAVOX MH1, 1920's

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RADIO MAGNAVOX MH1, 1920's

Designed to replace Headphones on early Wireless sets, before loudspeakers had been perfected because of problems with a strong enough magnet.
The coil is a high enough impedance to connect directly to the output valve of the set. The terminals on the units would carry high voltages, and yet no insulation was thought necessary.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1164

Image of STERLING 'BABY' LOUDSPEAKER HORN, 1923

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STERLING 'BABY' LOUDSPEAKER HORN, 1923

Designed to replace Headphones on early Wireless sets, before loudspeakers had been perfected because of problems with a strong enough magnet.
The coil is a high enough impedance to connect directly to the output valve of the set. The terminals on the units would carry high voltages, and yet no insulation was thought necessary.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1204

Image of RADIO LOUDSPEAKER HORNS, 1920's

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RADIO LOUDSPEAKER HORNS, 1920's

A selection of loudspeaker horns from the 1920's and a Bakelite Philips Loudspeaker from the 1930's.

Including
A BTH Tpe C2 1925
An Amplion 'Standard Dragon' AR19 1923
A Telephones Le Las Horn 1920's
A Philips Lamps Ltd Bakelite Loudspeaker surround Model 2007 1928
The horns would replace headphones on early valve receivers before loudspeakers had been perfected, or even manufactured, and were simply connected directly to the audio amplifier valve in the receiver. They were normally high resistance and therefore very sensitive. The connection from the audio amplifier valve would carry high voltages; (not liked by today's health and safety regulations!)

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A0167 to A0170

Image of REVOPHONE CRYSTAL SET AND HEADPHONES, 1923

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REVOPHONE CRYSTAL SET AND HEADPHONES, 1923

The Revophone Crystal Set 1923 Cost £2-10s Royalty was extra at 7s-6d. Its wooden box with hinged lid is in excellent condition, inside are two knobs and the crystal holder.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1188

Image of GECOPHONE JUNIOR CRYSTAL SET, 1925

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GECOPHONE JUNIOR CRYSTAL SET, 1925

This is the GECOPHONE Junior Crystal Set BC1700. Built by GEC (UK) in 1925, this simple crystal set is in a polished mahogany case. The connection points for the aerial, earth and headphones are all provided, the controls comprise a tuning knob and a lever to adjust the detector. This set would have cost 15s 0d in 1925,the 1600m Loading Coil would cost an extra 7s 6d.

At the back of the set is the 'Entirely British Manufacture' BBC stamp.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1233

Image of HMV 441A WIRELESS, 1935

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HMV 441A WIRELESS, 1935

Made by Marconiphone Ltd in 1935 as Model 264 for HMV, and sold as Model 441A with their Logo on the top. A large polished wooden cabinet with speaker fret on the front with bakelite frame and linear dial behind glass.

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A1138

Image of DICKSEN 'MIDGET' 4 VALVE WIRELESS DM40, 1939

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DICKSEN 'MIDGET' 4 VALVE WIRELESS DM40, 1939

Midget radios became popular in America between the wars as new smaller valves were being developed, this is just one example made in 1939 it has 4 valves including the mains rectifier, and a simple TRF circuit design.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1206

Image of MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY'S RADIO, V2 MODEL, 1922

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MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY'S RADIO, V2 MODEL, 1922

2 valve reflex circuit, manufactured between 1922 and 1926. Original cost £22.8s.0d reducing to £15.16s.2d in 1925, and to £8.0s.0d in 1926.

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A0771

Image of McMICHAEL MAINS THREE RADIO, 1931

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McMICHAEL MAINS THREE RADIO, 1931

The McMichael Mains Three of 1931 was a three valve TRF receiver that was built like a Tank, with a metal back and no expense spared on its construction. In 1931 it cost 20Gns. Valves and Royalty's included.

The Mains Three is what is known as a 'landmark set', i.e. it introduced a significant or interesting feature into radio design. In this case, it was the first radio to have a dial calibrated directly in wavelength (metres) - up until then dials/knobs were 0-100 with a look-up table.

Bruce Hammond Collection

Thanks to (www.McMichael.org.uk) David Cochrane.

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A1162

Image of McMICHAEL SUPER RANGE PORTABLE FOUR, 1932

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McMICHAEL SUPER RANGE PORTABLE FOUR, 1932

The McMichael Super Range Portable Four is similar but an earlier version of the Duplex Four Type S. which in its sales literature is described as:-.

A high efficiency four valve circuit is employed, double gang tuned to indicate on the duplex scale (not fitted on this model). An automatic grid bias dispenses with a grid bias battery (grid bias required with this model) and automatically adjusts the reproducing valves to maintain unimpared tonal quality throughout the life of the high tension battery. The set is contained in a handsome case of dark furniture hide, fitted with ebonite panels and controls, with with nickelled panel fittings. For protection an aluminium valve screen is employed.

Made between 1928 and 1931 it cost around 17 Gns.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1165

Image of McMICHAEL CONSOLE RADIO MODEL135, 1935

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McMICHAEL CONSOLE RADIO MODEL135, 1935

The firm of McMichael Radio, based in Slough, was established in the early 1920s by Leslie McMichael, in collaboration with design engineer Ben Hesketh. (Until the late 30s, sets carried the initials M-H, which stood for McMichael-Hesketh.)

Their sets were very solidly engineered, and made to a high standard. The company went to a lot of trouble promoting the radios. Publicity was helped by demonstrations of their sets' abilities to receive on trains and aeroplanes. These tests were probably less severe than the public imagined, but they were good publicity stunts.

Their sets were sold mainly by accredited dealers, who were urged on by an in-house magazine called the McMichael Messenger, which featured dealers from around the country.

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A0536

Image of RADIOLA BRITISH THOMPSON HOUSTON BIJOU, CRYSTAL SET  GPO Reg. No. 861, 1923

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RADIOLA BRITISH THOMPSON HOUSTON BIJOU, CRYSTAL SET GPO Reg. No. 861, 1923

Early Crystal receiver, Form B, Cost £1.15s.0d. Also shown is a boxed set of Brown's Type F headphones

Printed on the front of the set is the PO licence number.
All manufactures were legally bound to obtain a licence from the Post Master General, before producing their Wireless Sets.

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A0138, A0150

Image of WWII UTILITY RADIOS

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WWII UTILITY RADIOS

Utility radios were made by over 40 different manufacturers, under a government directive. They were very basic to keep the cost as low as possible, enabling everybody to be kept informed of events. Both Mains and battery versions are shown.
The battery version on the left was made by, Philips Lamps Ltd. and has a manufacturers mar of U8.
The mains version on the right was made by, Kolsta Brandes. and has the manufacturers mark U23.

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A0163, A0162


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